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October 27, 1961 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-27

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_7 18 THE MICHIGAN DAILY
x "r. : 11~ i

PATI'1 rcu r ~il

5-Lh."LI FA I V1ALS: ,
18th en.tury EliteSet, ArtitcTed

By LAURA WOLFGANG
"Trndsin 18th century Eng-
lishi architecture and decorative
arts wvere primarily determined by
,:artistically aware, travelled intel-
lectuals of the time," John Steeg-
,man of the Fine Arts Advisory of
the British Council said, yester-
day. i
Speaking on "The Rule of Taste
in, 18thi Century England," he ex-
plained men such as Lord Burl-
iigton, Edmund Burke and- Sir
Joshua Reynolds developed an
esthetic code which gradually be-
came accepted as the standards of
good taste of th~e time.
The primary type of 18th cen-
tury architecture was classical,
modified by Renaissance art, This
sort of structure was primarily do-
-mxestic,. as in the great country es-
tates of the dray.
Beautiful, Uncomfortable
.These were symm~'etrical and
austere," eteegilan said, "4as well
as beautiful and incredibly un-
comfortable."

In .time, there was. a .revolt
Gagainst. the extreme formalityr of
the classical, which then develop-
;ed, into the English baroque; lack-
ing the strong contrasts of light
and {shadow, ,the exuberant move-
ment "and fiterplay of recession
and projection of the*' building.
surfaces of continental architec-
ture.
James Thornhill was. the, only;
truly baroque artist in England
during this period, as the major'-
ty of baroque decoration wars
done by ' Italian.. and French art-
fists, he said..
Second Breakthrough
A second manifestation of the
breakIng away from the rigidity
of classical. architectulre was
shown in the enthusiasm for any-
thing Chinese.
Pavilions. arid pagodas ,sprung
up throughout. Europe while in
England the enthusiasm was' con-
fined mostly to "fanciful, charm-

B" gy PLP rSUTINv
.Alth~ugh requests for college
teachers and administrators Jump-
ed ten per cent within the last
year, .the education school grad-
uated only one maore student Ito
meet this need.
Various educational institutions
registered 4,520 requests for such
personnel in .1960-1961, compared
to 4,119 in 1959-1960, Elbert W.
Van Aken of ,the Bureau of Ap-
pointments reported recently,
The education school produced
642 graduates with masters and
doctors degrees to' fill these posi-
tionls.
This is one more than the pre-
vious year, Dean -Willard C. Ol-
son of the education: school:-said.
Difficult to .Increase
"It would be pretty difficult to
increase-substantially the number
of graduates. Thie school does: not
have the money, the. staff, or the
space to do this,"' he added.
Olson expects that there will be
a "modest increase" in the num-{
ber of gradu~ates. However, this
increase will be "too little, too
late."
"I am hopeful that the school
will continue this increase in the

'hat
rent
for
ere
sy-
lan
fart'
aer-
ecl,
re-
2f0
sci-
es,
lan'
part
ay.
tnit
wrn
the
for

t 'JOHN STEEGMAN
. .. artistic .elite a
ing and very rococco" indoor- dec-
orations.
This mnovement was superceded
by a Gothic revilal in architec-
ture :which eventually parallel the
classical in popularity.x
A, very 'important part of the
18th century domestic art were
the gardens whose purpose was to
set off. the estates they' surround-
ed. These were carefully planned
out although they often. gave the1
impression of spontanlety.

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D iY FFCIA"BLLTI
(Cniudfo ae4:hE, E e.M-h:E u etrs ieb o.6fr1ttojb
FiCsontinfre om Rub e 4} ChAllD,-MEcs&Mcen. Feb.sgaD: s.Both-rchorsleb Corp, Hihladfark, Mioh.ob
Nolevllmd;Men & Women. Des.. R. & 13., Installa- -Accountant for 18 month develop-
visions--Akron, Ohio; tolsilId ion Engrg, etlporm he ietasg.
Wyandotte, Mich.; Pottstown, Penna.- etlporm hndrc sin
ESi-MS: ChE & IE. ES: EE, E Physics &Z OCT. 31 (a.m.)- ment. Degree in Accounting with i"2
ME. Feb., June grads. Will not inter- Stauffer Chemical Co., Victor Chem- yes, exper. in general accounting.
view NROTC. Des.,, R, & D.,? Sales, ical Works, Chicago, fll.-BS-MB ChE. Alco Products, Iac -Product Service
Prod., Glen"1, Methods & Standards. Feb. & June grads. R. & D,, Prod. Engineers-fors foreign assignments.
Modine Manufarcturing Co., Racine, OCT. 31-" Speaking of French, Spanish or CGer-
Wis.-BS: lE & ME. Feb. gradis. Des., Sundstrand Carp., Rockfprd, Ill.- man essential. Engrg, degree. with some
R, & D., Sales & Prod. 88-MS: EE & ME. MS: EM. BS: E exper.; Renewal, .Parts Sales Promo-
OCT. 30-. Physics & IL. Feb. grads. Des., R. & tion Supervisor-to plan new product
D~, Prod., Testing, Tech. Writing, sales programs. Degree with some exper.
Northrop Corp., N'! orair Div., Saw- OCT. 31- in renewal pis. operation; Accountants
thorne, Calif.; Nortronics Div,, Haw- Surface Comibustion, Div. Midland- --ES with accounting. mayor.
thorne & Palo Verdes, Calif.--AiI De- RssCorp., Toledo, Olhio-EBS: ChE, CE, Thiokol Chem. Corp., Bristol, Pa-
grees: AE & Astro., CE, EE, Miet. & Nu- " ME & Met. Feb. & June grads. Des,, Position in Market Research for grad
clear. ES: E Math & E Physics. Feb.. R. .& D., Sales, Prod, Field Erection- with degree in Chem:, Chem. Engrg.,. or
grads. Both Men & Women-No ROTC. (June grads only for Des,).comparable field, Exper. of 3-5 yrs. with
Des~, R. & D., Prod., Analytical & Test, medium or °large chemi. company.
OCT. 34-31-"OCCT. 31-NOV. 1- U.S. Dept. of Agrculture, Research
- The Procter & Gxamble Co., Mfg., R, Tennessee Gas Transmission Co,, Servie-Two fellowships in New Or-
&:D., Engrg., & Ind. Engrg-Ail De- Hlouston, Texas--B.MB: ChE. , leans" Lab. One for Senior Scientist
grees; ChE. BS-MS: CE, EE, EM, XE OCT. 31- With training & exper, in Organic Chem.
MB: md. Admxin. .& Instru, ESl E The Toledo Edison Co., Toledo, Ohio & Eliochem. Second for individual with.
'Physics. Des., Ft. & D., Prod. -ES: EE, XE & ME1. Des., R. & D~.,$S in Chem~. or Biochem. Fellowships
;OCT. 3- Sales & Prod. renewable on yearly basis,
Sinclair Research, Inc,, Harvey, Ill,- Universal Electric Co., Owasso, Michi. Wisconsin Civil Service--Public Health
BS-MS: ChE. Des., R. & D, -BS-MB:ER.F'eb. &t June grads. Both Sanitarians-various lcations in .Wis.
(a.m)- Men & .Women. Des., Sales & Prod. Major in BE~eteriolagy, Biology, or Chem,
Union Carbide, Consumer Products & one yr. exper. in environmental san-
Co. Plants & Dev. Labs --BS-MiB: ChE, POSITION OPENiNGS: itation or closely related field, File by
EE, XE & M1E. Also Summer Employment Michigan Civil Service-Openings as Nov. 25".
for '63 Grads. R, & D, & prod. follows: Construction Estimator, In- Please call Burneau of Appts., Gleneral
United Aircraft, Pratt & Whitney Air- surance Examiner, Medical Lab. Super- Div., 3200 SAS, Ext. 3544 for further in-
craft. E. Hartford, Conn,; W; Palm visors, Landscape Architects, &; Psy- formnation.
Beach, Fla.-All Degrees: AR ,& Astro., chiatric Social Work. Supervisor &i Di- Par t-Ti"ne
the following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
, / ''' ] " fi~can be made ini the Part-time Place-
- ; t; 1vl ment Offi ce, 2200 SAS, Monday thi
'' Friday 8 am. til 12 noon and 1:30 til
S5 p.m.
" ] Employers desirous of hiring stu-
si elecion of dents for part-time or full-time tem-
j porary Work, shoulid contact Jack Lain-
~ die, NO 3-1511, ext. 3553,
S1 ""'""'"'"""'" Students desiring miscellaneous odd
] jobs should consult the bulletin board
Perro",,sl i;' , ii! in Room 2200, dal.
u L----------- I 1-Busboy, 11:00-2:00, five days per
week, also Sat. & Bun.
2--Salesmen to sell college sportswear
3-Salesmen, sell china & silverware,
/ .- commission basis.
frm u u usa-~~-Several salesmen to sell magazines.
,a yaJrs least a junior, background in ra-
dio-isotope.
4-Mieal jobs,
i FEMALE
2-Pull-time salesladies for women's.
f'" ( ' ( f" Jf- '' * "( apparel shop, experienced.
t V t,.4 V JPr fitrs, Inc.4+ 3-Wtrrses, 12-2:0p.m., MondayS
1}!"-Waitress, Friday & ,Saturday eve-
£ 9 S!3: 'I i I 5 ',£' S.Lx3 flings, 12 noon-8 :40 p.m. Sunday,

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