100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 26, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,. - R .L~ - n.L i~vu. qn. ina

I I " " . :,aa l1 rl t V '' D~ f '.i -

tali x

Panhellenic
Announces
Committee
The Executive Committee of
Panhellenic Association has named
the members of its committee set
up to study special Panhel prob-
lems.
Elizabeth Seibold, '62, President
of Alpha Phi, Shirley Tucker, '62,
President of Phi Sigma Sigma,
and Betsy Carroll, '62, President
of Pi Beta Phi, are the members
from the President's Council.
Ann Gomez, '63, Secretary, and
Suzanne Brockway, '63Ed., Treas-
urer, are from the Executive Coun-
cil. Two membersat. large, Car-
oltta Maize, '62, of Alpha Xi Delta
and Katherine Bennett, '62, of
Kappa Alpha Theta, were named
to the committee.-
Scholars Council
To Discuss Poll
The Interdisciplinary .Scholars
Council will hold a public meet-
ing at 7:30 p.m. today in the Mich-
igan Union. The discussion topic
will be "Re-evaluation of the Stu-
dent Opinion Poll of the Faculty."
Members Chosen
For Quadrants
The West Quadrangle Quadrants
Honor Society initiated six new
members last night. They are Tom
Rogers, '63; Robert Wall, '64; Bar-
ry Thomas, '64; Curtis Hunting-
ton, '64; William Foltz, '61, and
Warren Gilbert, '62E.

COOLEY LECTURE:
Oxford's Wade Explains
Administrative Justice

By PHILIP SUTIN
The difference between legisla-
tive and adjudicative facts is im-
portant in the carrying out of
administrative justice, Prof. H.
W. R. Wade of Oxford University
said yesterday in the last of the
1961 Thomas M. Cooley Memorial
Lectures.
"Legislative facts are used in
determining policy and adjudica-
tive ones are subject of policy,"
Prof. Wade explained.
This difference is important
when considering fairness in a
case. Adjudicative facts which are
revealed after a hearing must be
made available to the parties hear-
ing for rebuttal. Legislative facts,
on the other hand, are general
ones which gained.
"Administrative justice ought to
aid administration, not .deter it,"
he :noted.
Prof. Wade cited the furor of
the Essex Chalk Pit case as an
example of the difficulties involv-
ed when this distinction is not
understood.
In that case, a company which
had been mining sand and gravel
in Essex, England, applied in 1957
for an' extention of a permit to
mine these substances and chalk
which at that time was not found
at the pit.
However, the neighbors with a
heavy investment in farming and
grazing land threatened by the
chalk dust caused by its possible
mining, objected to this renewal.
After an inquiry had been held,
the decision was reversed and ex-

tension granted under severe re-
strictions.
"Two things made the reversal
hard to bear for the objectors;
First the department used advice
of experts rather than the report
of the inspector as a basis for
the decision.
"Second, the minister consulted
with experts in the agriculture
ministry, which was pushing the
mining, before making a decision,"
Men Chosen
By Tnriangle
From 'neath the heels of dusty
feet,
Within the vitals of the Arch,
The great bronze seal called loy-
al men
In the dead of night to march.
So came the men of Triangles.
Once more beneath the pointed
spires
New faces toiled with fear;
The seal of Triangles again
shone bright,
Cleansed with blood and fear.
So came: Jim Apple, Warren
Devine, Robert Geary, Tim
Graul, John McConnell, Da-
vid Randall, Brian Rickard,
Richard Thelwell, and John
G. Young, assistant to the
dean of the engineering col-
lege.

ACWR Set
To Discuss
New Plans,
Americans Committed to World
Responsibility will hold 'an orga-
nizational meeting at 7:30 p.m. to-
day in Rm. 3529 of the SAB.
The, meeting will be concerned
with organization of the depart-
ment of studies on the United
Nations, a project undertaken by
ACWR which involves the foun-
dation of the United Nations uni-
versity.
Chairmen and vice-chairmen of
ACWR committees, will be ap-
pointed and a seminar concern-
ing the UN University will be plan-
ned. A report on the university,
prepared by ACWR members, will
be available for all persons.
Meeting Continues
On WilsoniNovel
A discussion of Edmund Wil-
son's book, To the Finland Sta-
tion" will be held at 7:15 tonight
in the Undergraduate Library
Honors Lounge. A continuation of
a previous seminar, the meeting
will include Prof. Frank Grace,
Prof. Stephen J. Tonsor, and
Prof. Arnold Kaufman.
DIAL 2-6264
ENDING FRIDAY *
the diabolical classic.!

The Honors Council of the lit-
erary college with the coopera-
tion of the University Extension
Service offers a summer reading
program for honors students who
wish to continue their academic
studies independently over the
summer.
Students may elect any course
suitable to directed reading and
for which a department will au-
thorize credit and will . provide
proper supervision.
Students Enroll
This past summer 40 students
enrolled in 41 different courses in
13 departments including anthro-
pology, college honors, English, Far
Eastern studies, German, great
books, history, math, philosophy,
political science, psychology, so-
ciology, and zoology.
Prof. Robert Haugh of the
English department, who super-
vised the English courses taken'
last summer, said that he felt the

LSA Honors Council Offers
Summer Reading Program
By CAROLYN WINTER I

program was very successful, al-
though more successful with some
students than others. "I favor any
scheme making the student more
responsible," he added.
Quite Workable
In political science, Prof. Roy
Pierce of the political science de-
partment supervised one course
with one student enrolled. He said
that the program seemed quite
workable but would not make any
broad generalization about it un-
til he had worked with more stu-
dents.
The basi structure of the pro-
gram is the same, but the details
vary from department to depart-
ment. The student meets with the
instructor who will supervise his
studies before he leaves campus in
June. He is at this time giyen his
reading list and any paper assign-
ments he may be required to do.
Students may enroll for the
course through the University
correspondence study division.

Discount Records" Inc.
Only branch in Ann Arbor of a coast-to-coach chain of record shops
FANTASTIC SAVINGS!

-THIS WEEK ONLY
COLUMBI1A
FOLKW'AYS
ELEKTRA
CLASSICAL, POPS, JAZZ, FOLK
HI-FI and STEREO

.... .. . .i :.. , .

achine Aids Studies on Heat Resistance of Cells

13

OFF.
mfg; list price

/'

The machine, called a high pres-
sure cell, is able to break off frag-
ments of cell walls of these spores'
by subjecting them to 50,000,
pounds of pressure per square
inch, Black said. This use of such
extremely high pressure is very
unusual in biological research be-
cause of its destructive nature on
living matter.
The bacterial spores presently

being studied at the University
are non-disease-producing organ-
isms, Black said. The cell frag-
ments are analyzed chemically to
determine their composition.
These isolated fragments may
then be used in preparing vaccines
for diseases caused by related bac-
terial spores. One spore presently
being studied is very similar to an
anthrax-producing spore, Black
explained.
Work is also being done else-
where to use isolated cell walls to
make vaccines against tuberculo-
sis, he noted.
As the bacterial cells leave the
pressure chamber the sudden
change in pressure causes the out-
er wall to be stripped off. These
fragments are then collected for
analysis, he explained.
The spores are approximately,
1.5 microns (1 micron equals one
25-thousandths of an inch) and
the isolated fragments are consid-
erably smaller.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Baha'i Student Group, Weekly Discus-
sion, Oct. 27, 8:00 p.m., 418 Lawrence.
Open to all interested. For informa-
tion and transportation call NO 3-2904.
Christian Science organization, Reg-
ular Testimony meeting, Oct. 26, 7:30
p.m., 3545 Student Activities Bldg.
Congregational Disciples E and R Stu-
dent Guild, Worship Service, Oct. 26,
12:10-12:40 p.m., Douglas Chapel, First
Congregational Church.
International Students Assoc., Hal-.
lowe'en Party, Saturday, Oct.. 28, 8:30
p.m., International Center. Costumes"
desirable but not obligatory.
* *
Newman Club, Hallowe'en Dance,
"Goblins' Gig," Fri., Oct. 27, 8:30-11:30
p.m., Newman Center.
Sailing Club, Regular Meeting, Thurs-
day, Oct. 26, 7:45 p.m., 311 W. Engineer-
ing.
Sigma Delta Chi, Professional Jour-
nalistic Society, Mon., Oct. 30, 4:00-5:30
p.m., Journalism Dept. Conference
Room, second floor Mason Hall.
Voice Political Party, Thurs., Oct. 26,
7:30 p.m., 3511 Student Activities Bldg.
General meeting; discussion of SGC
elections: subcommittees.
Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Oct. 27, noon, Guild House,
802 Monroe, Cost luncheon, discussion
-The Voice Party.

The machine, located in the East
Medical. Building, is one of several
in the country. It was built by
engineers on the North campus,.
Black said.
ITOMORROWI

3.98 list 4.98 list 5.98 list
2o.65.,* 3.332 * O3.99
EXTRA-SPECIAL.
EVEREST RECORDS
HI-FI and STEREO
ALL RECORDS are mastered on 35 mm. film '
for the best fidelity on records.
CLASSICAL ONLY

STARTS SATURDAY *
Academy Award
talk has begun for
NATALIE WOOD

SAMUEL H. BLACK
... bacterial spores

JOAN BAEZ,
"An achingly pure soprano voice."
High Fidelity
"A major new folk singing talent."
Saturday Review
"I was enthralled!"
Nat Hentoff, The Reporter
"Sends one scurrying for superla-
tives." N. Y. Times,
ANN ARBOR HIGH
Tickets $2.75-2.25-1.75.
ON SALE AT
THE DISC SHOP
1210S. University
HI FI & TV CENTER
304 S. Thayer'

Highlighted by:
LEOPOLD STOKOWS K -SIR EUGENE GOOSENS
6030-Brahms: 3rd Symphony 3047-Stravinsky: Rite
3011-Tchaikovsky: Francesca 603--Stravinsky: Pet
do Rimini . 60:35-Tchaikovsky: M
3016-Villa Lobos: Uiropuru 6037-Berlioz: Symph
3023-Strauss: Till Eulenspiegel Fantastique
6043-Prokofiev: Peter and the 6041-Villa Lobos: Lii
Wolf SPIVAKOVSKY-
SIR MALCOLM SARGENT-- 3045-Sibelias: Violin+
6039-Tchaikovsky: 3049-Tchikovsky:'V
5th Symphony Cnet
3034.-Prokofiev: 5th Symphony Concerto
OTHERS TO CHOOSE FROM
4.98-5.98 list price
ALL 19

DIAL 5-6290

I-
e of Spring
rouchko
Manfred
onie
ttle Train
Concerto
'iolin

fr her sensational per-
formance in Elia Kazan's
production of William
Inge's first play especially
written for the screen.
THN GRASS
'tCHNCOLOR rWARNER BROS.

i
1

discount, records, h
Free Parking 337 S. Main NO 5-4460
Open Mon. through Fri. 10 A.M. to 9 P.M.; Sat. until 6

10

ENDING TONIGHT
it actualy happened!
W SOR? THAT THRLED MILIJISI
b!-6M presas,
B e
toth
SuIn
w*1JAMES SHIGETA

I

u blie

lESs

FRIDAY
"BACK STREET"

~1

N.\

FE--

A

ETA

~1~

tonite-
tomorrow
nendelssohn
theatre
8:00 p. m.

to interview candidates for
Student Government Council

T
H
E

4j

I

Conducted by

b I

TL. ~m .iTLU E kA fl t^U !'!A KI M All 'V

® I

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan