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October 25, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1

ations

Condemn Soviet
Est H-Bomb Test

t :: .. ::.....~i.~nA..~ *4

For

Lat(

-AP Wirephoto
.CONFERENCE-Japanese, Thai and Canadian delegates to the United Nations confer before the
meeting of the Political Committee yesterday where several nations denounced the Soviet Union
for its recent test of a 30-megaton hydrogen bomb.

y

NEW RULING:
Close Off East Berlin
TO U.S. Civilan Aes
BERLIN ()- 'ihe United States Army yesterday quietly banned
private trips to East Berlin by civilian members of the United States
mission.
American soldiers wearing civilian clothes also were affected by
the ban, apparently imposed to avoid a clash with the Communists
over Western access rights to East Berlin.
Communist East Germany announced Monday that all - persons
in civilian clothes must show their identity documents to East German
People's Police, even if they are
members of the Allied garrisons
N obel WJ ner in Allied-licensed cars.
New Order
The new American order avoid-
ed an immediate challenge of the
AsTCommunist restriction, which look-
Asks oyage ed like another chip off the long
- established Western rights and
JOHANNESBURG (M - Albert privileges in Berlin.
John Luthuli, winner!of. a Nobel The ban was not publicly an-
nounced. Nor' would spokesmen
Peace Prize for his fight against formally admit that' it even exist'
South Africa's white supremacy ed. The order from headquarters
policies, said yesterday he will was quietly put into operation at
seek permission to go to jEurope the Friedrichstrasse border check-
sepesinto goceto Europerd. point at 3 p.m.
to receive the award. United States counter-intelli-
The South African government gence agent at the checkpoint dis-
has exiled him to a Negro reser- creetly advised civilians in Amer-
vation. It refused to indicate ican-licensed cars against crossing
whether'it would grant a passport into East Berlin.
and exit visa to the 62-year-old Not Allowed
former Zulu chief. Officers at the Military Police
Interior Minister Jan de Klerk border 'post said civilian members
said the question is being consid- of the United States mission
ered. would not be allowed to ignore
It was reliably reported that the agent's advice. None tried.
Prime Minister Hendrik F. Ver- The new ruling did not apply
woerd himself will make the de- to American + civilians such as
cision. newsmen who have army-licensed
The African Congress of Demo- cars but do not belong to the
crats supported Luthuli's requests. United States mission staff. Some
________________________American newsmen were stopped
.. . . . . at first, but officials said this was
a mistake.
Heretofore Allied personnel en-
tering border checkpoints have re-
fused to submit to identity checks
because the West does not rec-
ognize the East German regime.
MP's marched into the Soviet
sector Sunday to escort a State
Departzient official after he was
stopped by East German police.
COEDS:
It's Hairstyling
V ~Galore!1
No Appointment Needed
Custom-Styling
The Dascola Barbers
:. Near Michigan Theatre

T

World News
Roundup

it

By The Associated Press
SAIGON, South Viet Nam --
South Viet Nam accused Commu-
nist North Viet, Nam yesterday of
dispatching hundreds of regular
troops through eastern Laos into
this pro-Western country to wage
a war "of subversion, terror and
direct aggression."
President Ngo Dinh Diem's gov-
ernment outlined its charges in a
formal request to the internation-
al control commission for an in-
vestigation.
The South Vietnamese action
could be a move to lay a lega
basis for United States interven.
tion with American troops. Such
intervention appeared to be gain-
ing sentiment among the South
Vietnamese themselves.
* * *
UNITED NATIONS-An emer-
gency measure opposed by the
Communists sailed through th
UN Assembly Budget Committee
yesterday, assuring the life of the
military program in the Congo t
the end of the year'.
The measure permits the UN
Secretariat to spend up to $1(
million a month in November and
December to keep the force of
16,000 men depldyed throughou
the Congo until. the General As-
sembly decides what the UN Congc
program will be in 1962.
The vote on the measure, spon
sored by 11 countries, was 55-E
with 15 abstentions and 22 coun-
tries absent.
WASHINGTON-The State De
partment said yesterday the So
viet airlift of arms into the rebel
held area of Laos has been grad
ually expanding over the past si:
weeks.
Press Officer Lincoln White
said that as the monsoon seasor
in southeast Asia drew to a close
the Soviets stepped up the floc
of arms and ammunition to
point where it now exceeds the
airlift rate of last May.
LONDON-Britain has begur
building a second nuclear sub
marine called the Valiant, the Ad-
miralty announced last night.
Britain's first nuclear sub, the
Dreadnought, was launched bs
Queen Elizabeth II a year ago
Built largely with Americar
knowhow, it is expected to be
commissioned early next year.

Reaction Hits
UN, Socialist
Conference
Eight-Nation Move
On Testing Collapses
UNITED NATIONS (A) - The
Soviet Union was denounced in
the United Nations yesterday for
testing a giant H-bomb, but a
small-nation move for an urgent
appeal to Moscow to refrain from
such tests collapsed.
United Nations Day discussions
in, the UN General Assembly's
main Political Committee includ-
ed debate on an eight nation res
olution on the bomb tests, watered
down to contain only an appeal
to Moscow not to explode a 50-
megaton bomb.
Per Hakkerup of Denmark told
the committee the sponsors had
accepted an Indian amendment
that deleted any expression of
concern that it would have an
adverse effect on health and wel-
fare of mankind and were not
pressing for priority.
But elsewhere, ground swell of
anger and fear of radioactive
fallout surged around the north-
ern hemisphere and penetrated to
southern nations in the wake of
the Soviet superbomb blast Mon-
day.
The shock over the explosion,
generally estimated as having a
force of about 30 megatons, or
equal to about 30 million tons of
TNT, was heightened by fear of
an even bigger blast to come. Pre-
mier Nikita S. Khrushchev has
said Russia will test a 50-mega-
ton bomb Oct. 30 or 31.
From Norway's north cape to
the Italian boot, the reaction in
Western Europe was the same:
x "Crimes against humanity" and
" "war in peacetime upon the in-
. fants jof the world," were news-
papers cries.
- Countries in Europe closest to
a the test at Novaya Zemlya in the
Arctic showed anxiety about the
dangers of contamination of in-
- fants' milk from radioactive 10-
e dine.
e In Japan, sometimes described
e as the crossroads of radioactive
e fallout currents, two major news-
o papers gave nearly two pages each
to editorial denunciation of the
q nuclear detonation, furious read-
0 er comments and suggestions on
d how to ward off the hazard.
f The World Congress of Socialists
t at Rome, in the name of 70 mil-
- lion voters, protested that the ex-
0 plosion was a "monstrous crime
against humanity" endangering
the lives of those living and un-
9 born.
Hugh Gaitskell, British Labor
Party leader, told the Congress
"wefeel deep disgust and cold
-anger."~

. . JJ 115' L Y t . f+}L".%1' 4flflWrMaw

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MONTH-END * .
7'en'iic (alue IPeat4

WE HAVEN'T COUNTED
THEM LATELY...
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. 1 .. - L .

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