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October 25, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIG~AN (DAILY

REIGN PANEL:
Students View Berlin Crisis

By GERALD STORCH
>anel of foreign students yes-
y discussed countervailing
egies and possible solutions to
'Crisis in Berlin." .
s. Rosa Erlichman, Spec, of
l, thought that the crisis
s mainly from Russia being
:d of the contrast in prod-
standards of living and free-
between the two Berlins.
student from West Germany,
n Gliss, Grad, added that
iain problem was the constant
of refugees from East to West

However, Vishvambher Pai-Pan-
ndiker, Grad, from India, viewed,
tie Russian actions as resulting
rom the pressures from Eastern
uropean countries. "The Soviet
7nion is attempting to stabilize
his region and in order to retain
;s prestige, it must force United
itates' recognition of East Ger-
nany," he explained.
Recognition Necessary
Pai-Panandiker said he could
ee no way how the West could
void this recognition.
The fourth member of the sem-
nax', sponsored by the Interna-
onal Affairs Committee of the
7nion, said that the main Russian
im is the complete control of all
f Germany.
KaJ Zaar, Spec, from Sweden,
ommented that, to alleviate the
COMING FRIDAY I

-Daily-Ed Langs
BERLIN CRISIS--Foreign students analyze the causes of tensions
in Berlin and pose various solutions during a panel discussion.

Studies Win
Nobel Prize
In Medicine
By FREDERICK ULEMAN
The Nobel Prize in Medicine to
Dr. George Von Bekesy last week
was not awarded for anything
specific, but for an "accumulation
of work done," Prof. Merle Law-
rence of the Medical School said.
The prize was awarded to Von
Bekesy for his model ear and re-
search showing how the dynamics
of the ear operate, added Martin
C. Schultz, head of the hearing
division of the Speech Clinic.
While it is important that he
was able to duplicate the func-
tions of the ear, it is even more
important that he was able to
understand what those functions
are and which of them are most
important. "The actual model is
sort of an aside," Schultz said.
Formulated Theory
Von Bekesy not only dffferen-
tiated the many existing theories
of the ear; he built his own
theory. This is why he was award-
ed the prize: for his "very fun-
damental and beautiful work upon
the function of the human ear,"
Schultz explained.
"Sound is simply vibrations in
the atmosphere which become
neural energy upon striking the
ear and are converted by the brain
into meaning. What kind of vi-
brations these are, how the trans-
fer is effected, and how much in-
formation is lost in the process are
the basic problems facing hear-
ing research," Schultz commented.
Kresge Foundation
Further work on these problems
will be done at the new Kresge
Hearing Research Institute when
the building is completed. The'In-
stitute will deal with the "basic
aspects of hearing and the causes
of deafness," said Prof. Lawrence.
The new laboratory, expected to
be in operation by Jan. 1, 1963,
will also deal with the other "com-
muication disorders," Lawrence
added. These include the throat
and various speech mechanisms,
he explained.
At present such work is done
at our physical accoustics labora-
tory and the new building will
use.many of, the same biophysics,
biochemistry and pathology ex-
perts, Lawrence noted.

-Daily-Larry vanice
THE TRIAL-The characters will perform with limited props on
a stark stage in the "U" Players opening presentation tonight.

crisis, "both sides must make some
concessions."
Best Solution
He felt that the best solution
would be to demilitarize both
countries, and move the United
Nations headquarters into Berlin.
However, he admitted this was
"impossible" considering the ten-
sion at present.
Gliss, however, thought that
with this move the pressure would
nevertheless remain and would in-
volve "too much" for both the
United States and Russia to give
up.
Pat - Panandiker added that
Western nations were not willing
to relinquish this much power to
DIAL 5-6290

the UN. "The people who made
the mess can't solve. the mess.
Russians Don't Care
The Russians "ddn't care"
about the East Germans, he said,
and the neutral nations, such as
India; do not particularly sym-
pathize with the Western -coun-
tries because of their attitudes on
colonialism.
Gliss remarked that other West-
ern countries, namely Britain and
France, are also somewhat satis-
fied with the situation as it is,
The moderator of the panel;
Prof.' Gerhard Weinberg of the
history department, said that, sim-
ilarly, the United States policy
toward Berlin in the past two
months has been to "sit tight-
and make sure the Russians know
we will continue to sit tight."
No Guarantee
Mrs. Erlichman then said that
"our. side will keep its word but
will the Russians. Who is going to
guarantee that this situation is go-
ing to be stable and permanent?"
The crisis is universal, she said,
and Brazil wholeheartedly sup-'
ports the United States on the
matter because "we think so much
alike."

The University Players will pre-
sent Franz Kafka's "The Trial"
at 8:00 p.m. tonight in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
This performance will mark the
opening of the 1961-1962 playbill
season. The play will run Wednes-
day through Saturday night.
The basic theme of "The Trial"
concerns a man caught in a web
of circumstances that he cannot
understand.
Under Arrest
He finds himself under arrest
one morning and is unaware of
the crime he has committed or
who has -had him arrested. Grad-
ually he finds his whole world of
reality has crumbled.
Kafka stresses the extreme sense
of guilt which arises not from re-
ligious reasons, but from the fact
that man is born into this com-
plex world and is under influences
beyond his control.
Director Andrew Doe and the
scene designer Ralph Duckwall use
a stage setting which has plat-
forms suspended at different

it

ENDING THURSDAY

JOAN BAEZ
"An achingly pure soprano voice."
High Fidelity
"A major new folk singing .talent."
Saturday Review
"I was enthralled i"
Nat Hentoff, The Reporter
"Sends one scurrying for superla-
tives." N. Y. Times
ANN ARBOR HIGH;
Tickets $2.75-2.25-1 .75
On Sale At
THE DISC 'SHOP
1210 S. University
HI FI & TV CENTER
304 . Thayer

it actually happened!
THE STORY THA THRlED MIOM NSI
M-G-M presents
Carrll Balk
{ t
AESun
-"" JAMES SHIGETA

11

1l

v

A,

11

Praises Idea of Grievance Investigator

F

I

FRIDAY
"BACK STREET

.t
,

Dial
2-6264

° All mmn
Ira

-ENDING
FRIDAY

By PHIIJP SUTIN
An ombudsman, an official who
investigates citizen's complaints,
against bureaucracy, would be a,
useful addition to the Council on
Tribunals in the realization of
administrative justice in England,'
Prof. H. W. R. Wade of Oxford
said yesterday.
This official in Scandinavian
countries has no legal power, he
said in the fourth of the Thomas
M. Cooley Lectures, but has great
influence through publicity.
"This office has strong appeal
in Britain. It is a symptom of the
public mind yearning for -more
redress against government. This
is, no doubt, an inevitable by-
product of the welfare state and
the perpetual growth of power,"
Prof. Wade explained.
British Criticism
A British criticism is that the
ombudsman is inconsistent with
parliamentary control. Private
Novick To Speak
On 'Fountainhead'
Ayn Rand's "The Fountainhead"
will be the subject of a Student
Government Council Reading and
Discussion Program, led by Prof.
M. E. Novick of the English de-
partment, at 7:15 p.m. today in
the Honors Lounge of the Under-
graduate Library.

grievances against ministries are
eligible for the parliamentary
questions which are an important'
control on the British executive,
"The question's drawback is that
it operates in a too political
arena," he noted. "This makes it
difficult for a minister to admit
he made a mistake. It also fails
to provide as judicial-like pro-
cedure."
The ombudsman provides a ma-
chinery for settling disputes be-
tween the government and the
citizen outside of politics. With a
small staff, such an official could
work below the ministerial level
and only use his powerful weapon
of public pressure when he feels
it necessary to issue a report.
Simple To Transplant
"Another attraction is that it is
simple to transplant. Any coun-
try with a free parliament and
free press can adapt this institu-
tion," Prof. Wade said.
He noted that much of the type
of work. the Scandinavian om-
budsman, handles is now being
undertaken in Britain by the
Council on Tribunals, created by
the Tribunal and Inquiry Act of
1958.
The Council, an advisory body
and "public watchdog" on tribun-
als and inquiries, consists of 14
niembers and a small secretariat.j
The group meets formally once a
month, but holds informal sub-

committees and visits various tri-
bunals to check on their work.
Force Standards
The Council as a permanent
body forces tribunals to adhere to
standards of fair play. "Superin-
tendence is needed. It is not
enough to leave a tribunal to a
government department," he de-
clared.
Prof. Wade will deliver the fifth
and final lecture of his series at
4:15 p.m. today in 100 Hutchins
Hall. He will speak on "On the
Record or Off the Record?"

SATURDAY
NATALIE WOOD f WARREN BEATTY
"SPLENDOR IN THE GRASS"

"ONE OF THE WORLD'S GREAT
PICTURES!. GO NOW" "Zr
MA MASTRW0RK"- nNmMug .
AICIRA
.KUROSA WA'S
MASTEPIECE
("TO LIVE'")
Ieasao SSirWU m a O NG ti ?cluke t i

ENDS THURSDAY
CAMPUS

FRIDAY
"TWO WOMEN"

"SUMMONS
In the name of the U-M Players you are commanded
that, laying aside all and singular your business and
excuses you be and appear as witness to
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seass se essasa sesesx ,.x
22 issiia ss at stk2 Sii:" o: :>;r:!>: ;:;<
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.. . . .. . .
"9
l FILTER

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