100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 21, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1961

.......

SATURDA'Y', OCTOBER 21,1961
OMMONNAM

-i

rein Sees No Final Solution
sing International Politics

EXCHANGE WEEKEND:
McCracken Notes Payments Deficit

1(1

By MUDITH BLEIER

olitics can't provide a lasting
tion for international prob-
s, Prof. Harold Stein of the
tical science department at
iceton University said here
lnesday.
t a Challenge seminar on "Po-
al Problems in National Se-
ty," Prof. Stein noted that the
we can hope for is "a series
solutions, and if we can live
i the situation maybe the pres-
s will decrease."
he political context in which
said we must work is one of
rgaining over the countries in
Asian periphery and Berlin.
Russians are very conscious
>oundaries. Neither side wants
o to war, but neither wants to
anything away for free."
The problem of the politicians
hat we will have to give a half
I and they will have to give
alf inch, and we'll have to live
1 it," Prof. Stein asserted.
Cites Berlin
e suggested the possibility of
Testern corridor to Berlin for
ing the "crisis" in Germany.
e Russians, on the other hand,
settle for a partial recogni-
of the East German regime."
he United States has taken the
tion that there is no solution
pt the re-unification of Ger-
iy, Prof. Stein added. "We've
our ally West Germany that
won't settle for anything ex-

PROF. HAROLD STEIN
. decries politics
cept unification, but this doesn't
seem possible."
Prof. Stein does not feel that
the emerging African nations will
effect the balance of power in
the world. "They're very primitive
countries," he .said. "They have
local power. but no power in the
military sense."
Margery Michelmore, who raised
a Nigerian storm for the Peace
Corps, "was telling the simple
truth," Prof. Stein said. "But that
isn't something Nigerians like to
hear."

By PHILIP SUTIN
"The United States is going to
have to take basic steps to close
the balance of payments deficit,"
Prof. Paul W. McCracken of the
business administration school
said yesterday.
Speaking to a luncheon in the
business administration student
council's exchange weekend pro-
gram with the University of Tor-
onto's commerce school, Prof. Mc-
Cracken explained that the Unit-
ed States has lost an average of
$2 billion a year since 1950.
He ascribed this loss to military
and foreign aid spending abroad,
and private capital remittances
to other countries. "In 1960 ex-
ports exceeded imports by $7 bil-
lion. However, spending at mili-
tary installations abroad added $3
billion, government grants and
foreign aid, $3 billion, and private
capital remittances, $4.7 billion.
This leaves the United States with
a net loss of $3.7 billion," he not-
ed.
1961 Situation
The 1961 situation looks super-
ficially better, Prof. McCracken
reported. The United States ac-
crued a $1 billion annual ,rate
gain in the balance of payments
in the second quarter, but he said
this was due to the non-recurring
payment of debt by West Ger-
many.
"If this debt payment were tak-
en out, there would be a debt of
$2 billion. The situation could de-
teriorate if imports rise more than
exports," he warned.
Weber, Sell, Kasle
Receive Awards
The Board of Directors of the
Alumni Association announced
awards to three past Association
directors at their semi-annual
meeting here yesterday.
The awards were presented to
Mrs. Earl J. Weber, Mrs. Rudolph
Sell, and Shirrel Kasle by Uni-
versity president emeritus Alex-
ander G. Ruthven.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Congreg. Disc. E & R Stud. Guild, Ci-
der Hour, Oct. 21, After Game; Scruti-
nizing Christian Faith, Pat Pickett, Oct.
22, 9:30 a.m.; 802 Monroe.
* * *
Eta Kappa Nu, Election Meeting, Oct.
23, 7:30 p.m., union.
Grad. Outing Club, Hike, Birch Lake
to Silver Lake, Oct. 22, 2 p.m., Meet
Rackham Bldg., Huron St. Entrance.
La Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia, Oct.
23, 3-5 p.m., 3050 FB.
Newman Club, Purdue Dunkers Hour
-Cider'n Donuts, After Game; Dinner,
6 p.m.; Oct. 21, Newman Center.
Voice Political Party, Oct. 22, 4:30
p.m., A. A. Congreg. Church, State &
Williams. Speaker: Curtis Hayes, stu-
dent protest leader in McComb, Miss.

I

The stor that had
to be
to ! ;.

No wonder it was read by
millions as a best-seller and
Reader's Digest special feature,
She gave up her way of life for
his-an American girl defying
danger in war-ravaged Tokyo
knowing a love so great
that made it all worthwhile.

This situationhas a number of
immediate implications. Prof. Mc-j
Cracken initially urged that the
required federal reserve minimum
of 25 per cent gold backing for
U.S. currency be abolished. Underj
this rule $11 billion of the $17 bil-
lion gold supply is frozen. "This
requirement is irrelevant to the
claims on the gold," he added.
However, this is politically im-
possible at present, Prof. McCrack-
en said.
Payments Balance
Secondly, he noted that domes-
tic economic policy can no longer
be planned without considering
American balance of payments.
This is nothing new for most
Tanaka Cites
Lag in Japan,
The study of journalism is 10
years more advanced in the Unit-
ed States than in Japan, Junichi
Tanaka, Spec, a Japanese jour-
nalist studying here under a Uni-
versity Press Club of Michigan
fellowship, said.
Tanaka, a news analyst on To-
kyo's fourth largest daily, Sankei
Shimbum, noted that the younger
journalists in Japan like to write
stories sensationally and that their
editors agree with them.
"There are some journalists who
would prefer a more scholarly at-
titude in covering the news, but
there is not much opportunity for
them," he added.
Covered Riots
Tanaka, who covered the riots
last year which eventually led to
the cancelling of former Presi-
dent Dwight D. Eisenhower's visit
to Japan, called the demonstration
against James Hagerty, former
White House press secretary, "the
most vicious attack." He said that
the rioters represented a minority
of Japanese opinion.
Although student political in-
terest is keener in Japan than in
the United States, the academic
side of college life is better here,
he said.
"The student-teacher relation-
ship is quite free in the United
States. The teaching method is
better."
Tanaka will stay at the Univer-
sity until June, a d then will
spend nine months working for
Michigan newspapers. Under the
fellowship program he will intern
at three state papers for a period
of three months each.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Building
before 2 p.m., two days preceding
publication..
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21
General Notices
Students are reminded that the first
installment of tuition fees was due
on October 2. All delinquent accounts
not paid by October 23 will result
in cancellation of enrollment. Students
who have elected the deferred tuition
payment plan are reminded that the
second payment is due November 29.
Concert. The Boston Symphony Or-
chestra, Charles Munch, Conductor, will
be presented in a special Homecoming
concert in Hill Aud. tonight at 8:30.
Mr. Munch will present the following
program: Howard Hanson's "Elegy";
Concerto for Violoncello No. 1 in A min-
or (Saint-Saens); with Samuel Mayes,
soloist; and the Brahms Symphony No.
1 in C minor.
Tickets are available until 11:45 a..
at the offices of the University Musi-
cal Society; and at the Hill Aud. box
office from 5:00 p.m. to concert time.

The Boston Symphony will also be
heard Sunday at 2:30 p.m. The Hill
Aud. box office will be open at 1:00
p.m. preceding the concert.
Box Office Opens Monday: For tickets
to Franz Kafka's tale of a man trap-
ped by forces beyond his control, "The
Trial," presented by the University
Players of the Department of Speech.
Performances at 8:00 p.m. Wed, through
Sat. at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Tickets $1.00 or 1.50 for Wed. or Thurs.
(Continued on Page 5)

countries, but the United States
is now facing it for the first time.
The United States should not
consider increased exports as a
permanent solution for this prob-
lem. "This solution only has lim-
ited mileage," Prof. McCracken
warned.
Four more basic issues should
be considered, he declared. The
United States should study wheth-
er it can afford foreign aid and
military spending abroad. It may
have to face the fact that it can-
not talk of full employment and
a favorable balance of payment,
since this condition tends to re-
duce exports.
The United States might be
forced to contemplate devaluating
the dollar as it would be too ex-
pensive in the world market. "It
would be a travesty to devaluate
the dollar as it would be a serious
blow to the carefully built finan-
cial order," he said.
Lastly, the United States might
have to consider joining the Eu-
ropean Common Market, he add-
ed.

Committee
Announces
New Posts
Seventeen newly filled positions
in the Women's League have been
announced.
They are Women's Judiciary
Council: Edith Bassichif,'64; Pub-
lic Relations Committee: Judy
Giefel, '64, Judy Beam, '64, Bar-
bara Postel, '63, and Sharon Logs-
den, '63; University Services Com-
mittee: Terry Boodner, '64, Gret-
chen Groth, '64, Pat Lutes, '64,
Joan Baginsky, '64, Joan Grobe,
'63, Jane Offenhauer, '63, and Sue
Hykes, '64; Student Services Com-
mittee: LeMoyne Wycoff, '63,
Alice Rickel, '64, and Sue Beck,
'64; Special Projects: Linda Beck,
'64; Social Committee: Joan Gus-
ten, '64; House Committee: Mar-
cia Kempf, '63.

r

NEWMAN CLUB
HOMECOMING
ALUMNI

Dinner

6 P.M.
$1.00

ONE OF THE WORLD'S GREAT
PICTURES!GO NOW!"
A ..ASTERWORKI"- Mga
AKIRA
.KUROSA WA'S Q
MASTERPIECE
("TI 4 0 VEM0)
Ilpnio iramwok t , s an ri

x 0=>0o0<04=>a=>0<==>0 0<=;>o=.>0 c c =;
O AID FOR HONG KONG
o REFUGEES COMMITTEE CLUB
Q CHINESE DINNERS
Prepared by Chinese Students
For the benefit of Hong Kong Refugees
Free Recipes F iRST METHODIST CHURCH Slides of Hong Kong
Couple: $3.50 Social Hall Single: $2.00
(Huron and State)
Saturday, October 28 6:00 P.M.
Tickets available at the INTERNATIONAL CENTER
a 0 t t a~oe-_ e

I

CAMPUS

DIAL
8-6426

4

FINAL PERFORMANCE

11

D.~b.AMES SHIGETA

dIaLa 56290ree a. ek e
DIAL 5-6290

li

rte!

-a.

Read and Use Michigan Daily Classifieds

Dial
2-6264

u'u~f H uUiiSiki i t' Wi I
'i' a1 "~111 iW

STARTING
TODAY

SHOWS START AT 1:00,
2:50, 4:50, 6:55, and 9:00
FEATURE STARTS
25 MINUTES LATER

PROF. PAUL W. McCRACKEN
balance of payments
Alfoldi Says
Early Rome
Rule a Myth
in the second of his series of
lectures on acient Rome, Andrew
Alfoldi, professor of Roman his-
tory at Princeton University's' In-
stitute for Advanced Study, de-
nied yesterday the long-popular
theory that Rome was a great
ruling power between 700 and 600
B.C.
Having established in his first
lecture that the last' decade of
the sixth century B.C. is a fixed
voint from which all Roman his-
tory can be traced, Prof. Alfoldi
explained how the myth of Rome's
earlier power arose.
During the Second Punic War,
Hannibal's historians were revil-
ing the Romans as near-barbar-
ians, Prof. Alfoldi said. In response
to the propaganda, a Roman his-
torian, Fabius Pictor, attempted
to prove the opposite. In doing
so, he forged an exaggerated pic-
ture of Roman greatness that is
still widely accepted, Prof. Al-
foldi asserted.
Prof. Alfoldi argued against the
traditional belief that Rome ruled
over the Latin league, a loose
confederation of city-states
created for their common defense.
He explained that the members
of the confederation had more
freedom than the Pictor tradition
suggests, and that they actually
sometimes fought each oher.
The rise of Rome,; Prof. Alfoldi
concluded, belongs not to the tra-
ditional period set by Fabius Pic-
tor, but only to the fifth and
fourth centuries B.C.
Prof. Alfoldi's talk was one of
six lectures that he is presenting
on early Rome and the Latins.
These talks constitute the ninth in
a series of annual lecture pro-
grams endowed by Thomas Spen-
cer Jerome, a former American
ambassador to Rome.

GE

ER

It will be directed by DONALD LOVELL. It will play at LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
only one more night, Saturday, Oct. 21. Curtain time is at eight o'clock.
TICKETS are $1.75 for Saturday night. They can be obtained at the Lydia Mendelssohn box
office. Box office open daily from 10:00 A.M. Phone NO 8-6300.

FINAL PERFORMANCE

rl

THE ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
CORDIALLY INVITES YOU to join in opening the new season with a wonderful and hilarious
evening of theatre as we bring you one of Broadway's greatest all-time comedy hits; Thomas
Heggen's and Joshua Logan's

"MISTER ROBERTS"

SUBSCRIBE TO

4

TIO

University Inter-Arts Magazine
ONE YEAR (4 lssuaes)W-$1
To subscribe mail the form below to

l

Generation... 420 Maynard.

. Ann Arbor

l ww r w rwwwwww rw- www------ww-w-- wweirw rya I

Enclosed is $1 in payment for a
1 year subscription (4 issues) to GENERATION

Name

Address

A4

I -
I " -""" " -"""""""""'"" -- -"""-""""-""""- -"-""- --""-'

STARRING -
E PRICE -JOHN K.RR.'.SI[LE[ A AND[ES RICHARD MATHESON ROGER CORMAN ES BAXTER

I

I.Q.C. ASSEMBLY

THE

;.°$

Presents the

STUDE

T

D RECTORY

11

11

I?

r

J

II

October 28

8:30 P.M.

Hill Aud.

.. i r r

I

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan