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October 18, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAIIY

Peace Seminar Views
International Systems

ORA LECTURE:
Pelikan Relates, Religion, National, Unity

By RONALD WILTON
At the second meeting of the
Student Peace Research Seminar
yesterday Prof. J. David Singer
presented the rudiments of five
models of international relations
systems for discussion.
The first of these was a model
used by the United States. "This
American model is essentially one
of harmony, where an invisible
hand allegedly operates in rela-
tions between nations. Nation X
will pursue its national interests,
which sometimes come in conflict
with nation Y. According to the
model, by resorting to professional
diplomacy, X and Y will be able
to settle the differences," Singer
said.
For the second model the in-
ternational system can be any-
where on the harmony conflict
continuom depending on the pe-
culiarities of the individual na-
tions on the scene at the moment.
American View
"This is also an American view,"
Singer declared. It is based on the
idea. that the world would be
harmonious if it were not for
totalitarian nations. This idea is
based upon our experiences with
Fascist Germany, Italy and Japan
and Communist Russia and
China."
The last of the three American
models holds that it is the devient
individual who comes along from
time to time, who is responsible
for leading nations out of har-
mony.
Considering the Marxian model
Singer noted that they see three
levels of conflict. These are be-
tween the Proletariat and the
Bourgoisie, between the bourgois
nations themselves; and between
the bourgois states and the so-
cialist states."
Natural
"With this orientation it is na-
tural for the Communists to see
the world in conflictory terms,"
Singer explained. They see the
trouble in the international sys-
tem as being caused by the bour-
gois capitalist nations. When the
proletariat take over there will be
peace."
Singer said that he found the
fifth model the most useful and
accurate.
This states that there will al-
ways be incompatabilities between
the national actors in the inter-
national system. Most problems
are quite minor and can be taken
care of diplomatically. However,
when something strikes close to
the heart of a nation's interest
neither diplomacy nor interna-
tional law work very well.
Top Country
"The top country, in this case
the U. S., is engaged in prevent-
Board Adopts
County Budget
A $3,549,713 record budget for
Washtenaw County for 1962 was
approved by a 31 to 2 vote of the
Board of Supervisors, Monday.
The amount of $50 thousand
will be used for clearing trees af-
flicted with the Dutch elm dis-
ease. Other appropriations were
made for the addition of six dep-
uties to the Sheriff's department,
the Huron Valley Child Guidance
Clinic and the Michigan Chil-
dren's Aid.
The budget, which is about $323
thousand higher than last year,
has also set aside funds for the
Southeastern Michigan Tourist
Association, the Supervisors Inter-
County Committee, direct relief to
welfare clients and more proba-
tion officers.
Funds for the budget will come
mainly from the general property
tax, non-tax revenues and a $607,-
000 balance from this year. Four
mills per $1,000 in equalized val-

uation will be assessed property
owners in order to meet the budget
requirements.
The funds appropriated for
clearance of diseased tiees were
half of what the County Road
Commission requested. However,
the board has set up a system to
channel the granted funds to ci-
ties, villages and the rest of the
county. Ann Arbor should receive
about $9,000 to cut down the af-
flicted elms.

ing the number two nation from
taking over. Due to this the USSRI
will try to increase its relative
power hoping to increase its abil-
ity to influence the U. S.
The U. S. will respond by seek-3
ing to boost its relative power<
over the new Russian peak andI
thus the nations are caught in
a rising spiral known as the Arms
Race. If nations would strive for
parity with each other instead of
trying to get ahead the system
would be better off. However they
cannot be expected to do this,"
Singer said.
Gives Plans
For Theatre
By MARTHA MacNEAL
Prof. Robert C. Schnitzer of1
the speech department, assuming
the newly-created post of Execu-
tive Director of University Thea-
tre; announced plans for establish-;
ment of a professional resident
theatre company at a luncheon
given by the Ann Arbor Theatre,
Council at the Michigan Union
yesterday.-
"We intend to make Ann Arbor
one of the top theatrical citiesi
of the United States, and to set
an example for the whole coun-
try," he said.
The Theatre Council was con-
vened by Chairman Jerrold Sand-'
ler, to present Schnitzer's plans'
to Mayor Cecil O. Creal and a1
representative group of faculty
and community leaders.
Outlines Objectives
Outlining his objectives, Schnit-
zer said, "The success of this pilot
project can serve as a signal to
many other universities. Broad-
way commercial theatre managers
are deeply alarmed at the declin-
ing state of New York theatre."
A network of, university-spon-
sored professional theatre:seasons
would. be a dynamic aid in the
decentralization of theatre in the
United States and could bring
about the rise of a national thea-
tre of professional stature." Such
a circult of university theatres
could possibly come into existence
within five years.
Schnitzer has administered the
President's Program for Inter-
national Cultural Exchange since
its inception in 1954, and recently
returned from launching the
Theatre Guild-Helen/ Hayes tour
of Latin America for the State
Department. He has been General
Manager for several broadway
producers.
Early Date
Schnitzer emphasized that plans
for the new program cannot be
stated in detail at this early date.
However, "it is no longer a ques-
tion of if, but when," he assured
the group. The first goal will be
the creation of a company of
"top-notch professional actors, not
necessarily stars, but of high qual-
ity. The brilliant young people
gravitate to broadway, and this
is one of the patterns we are try-
ing to break," he said.
Citing the narrowing circle of
commercial broadway theatre,
Schnitzer noted that legitimate
theatre productions of classics and
modern experimental works need
special support, and that talented
scripts are the basis of such thea-
tre. It is hoped that graduate
students of the department of
speech and new playwrites will be-
come associated with the effort.
The theatre program will be
designed "to serve the campus,
the community, and the entire
state," Schnitzer said. Its objective
will be cooperation, not competi-
tion, with other University and

local theatre groups, and seasons
will be arranged to avoid conflict.

By HELENE SCHIFF
"America today must be One
Nation Under God, not make a
God of the Nation," Prof. Jaro-
slav Pelikan of the Divinity School
at the University of Chicago, said
yesterday.
Speaking at the Fall Lecture
Series sponsored by the Office of
Religious Affairs on the topic,
"One Nation Under God-Reli-
gious Resources for National
Unity," Prof. Pelikan said the only
way of relating national unity and
religious particularities is through
"confessional dialogue." This
means that each religious tradi-
tion must deepen its commitment
and loyalty to itself and in this
way possess Americanism, he
added.
"The way to be an American
is not to be less Jewish, but more
Jewish, not less Christian, but
more Christian," Prof. Pelikan
said.
Presidential Campaign
The 1960 presidential campaign,
Prof. Pelikan said, raised many
questions about religions and their
relation to national unity. The
election disclosed that the United'
States regards itself as Protestant
but not Christian. "Despite the
first amendment and its inter-
pretation today, an established.
religion is a characteristic way of
being religious," he said.
Today religious particularity is
on an increase because more men
are asking themselves why they
are what they are, Prof. Pelikan
noted.
Americans are either on their
way to being split up or finding a
way to relate this particularity to
their national unity, he said.
One possible solution to the
problem is to use the Method of
American "Shinto." In Japan
Betts To" Discuss
Foreign Service
Ernest C. Betts Jr., of the State
Department wil speak on the pre-
paration and requirements for
joining the foreign service at 4
p.m. today in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
The talk is sponsored by the
political science department acid
the Bureau of Appointments.

size for instead or being more
than it is, it will be less than it
is, he explained.
Another suggestion is to adopt
religious relativism in which all
religions are equal and are all
devoted ultimately to the same
principles. "This method of re-
duction and equalization betrays
the very thing it seeks to culti-
vate," Prof. Pelikan said, and
therefore should also be rejected.
National Rererendum
The third proposal is a na-
tional referendum by which a
single religion is established as
the religion of the state, he said.
"This would only result in the
destruction of all that America
stands for, and in order to keep
religions religious we must resist
this solution."
The viable solution is through
a dialogue of confession where
Americans can find resources for
the nation for the next 30 years,
he said. As soon as the three
major religious traditions can rec-
ognize their debts and affinities
to each other and the depths of
convictions that divide them they
will each in turn be strengthened.
"Where this loyalty speaks, men
may find resources for a creative
citizenship and the meaning and
promise of life," Prof. Pelikan said.

PROF. JAROSLAV PELIKAN
... religion, national unity
there is but one religion in whose
temple any other religion may
have a shrine. "In our country
America would become the religion
of Americans and each particular
religion would be asked to dull
its part so as to fit itself into the
one synchronistic religion," he
said.
This is not the answer. Amerl-
canism must be cut down to its

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