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October 14, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-10-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i.

Sells 135

Jet
Air

To-'

Yugoslav

P)lanes
Eisenhower
Decision Set
In January
Pilots To Train
At Texas Base
WASHINGTON (P)-The Unit-
ed States disclosed yesterday the
sale of 135 Saber jet fighter air-
craft to Yugoslavia early this year,
in, line with a policy of assisting
the 'Communist government at
Belgrade to maintain Yugoslavia's
"national independence."
- The State and Defense Depart-
ments said that as part of the
deal eight Yugoslav air force men
are being trained at Perrin Air
Force Base, Texas, in the opera-
tion and maintenance of the F86D
all-weather jet interceptors.
The State Department said the
decision to sell the planes was
made in mid-January, about five
days before the end of the Dwight
D. Eisenhower administration.
Announcement Unusual
The Washington announcement'
was' unusual in two respects :
1. It ignored the troubled 'his-
tory of -United States-Yugoslav
relations in the field of aid and
military cooperation. Criticisms
in Congress, at one point several
years ago, caused President Mar-
shal Tito's government to an-
nounce it did not want United
States arms.
2. It also ignored the fact that
there was disappointment in the
government here in recent weeks
over the critical tone of Yugo-
slavia's position in the conference
of 25 non-aligned countries at Bel-
grade during the summer.
Officials Annoyed'
United States officials have, in
fact, been annoyed by what ap-
peared to be a broadly pro-Soviet
policy being followed by Tito, de-
spite his independent ;Communist
position.'
Press Officer Lincoln White told
,a news conference at the State
Department that the decision to
sell the surplus saber jets - no
longer used in regular United
States Air Force combat upits-
was made before the end of the
Eisenhower administration and
the contract was signed Jan. 15.
He emphasized this was a sale of
aircraft and not a gift.

Lloyd Asks
New Policy
On Salary
BRIGHTON, England (I)-Sel-
wyn Lloyd yesterday proposed a
voluntary planning system for'
Britain's economy with all work-
ers' pay tied to the level of pro-
duction maintained by the nation.
Under the system, payrolls
would only become fatter when
business conditions justified in-
creases, he told the Conservative
party conference. He conceded
this would involve "a good deal
of departure from precedent."
lIe said he intended to begin at
once setting up planning machin-
ery for Britain's limping economy.
At the top will be- a National
Economic Development Council of
about 20 members government
ministers, employers and trade
union leaders.
The council and a body of ex-
perts working under it will seek
long-range methods of protecting
the pound and combating Brit-
ain's inflation by stimulating ex-
ports.
The system will operate on a
basis of voluntary cooperation,
Lloyd said, emphasizing that he
was not asking for massive gov-
ernment powers to control labor or
capitaY-
Nevertheless, many of the 5,000
delegates to the conference were
startled and received his planning
proposals cooly. To them, the idea
of economic planning smacks of
Socialism or even Communism.

-WASHINGTON (P)-The Civil
Rights Commission called yester-
day for a full scale attack by the
Federal government on racial dis-
crimination that keeps the Negro
trapped in unskilled, low paying
jobs.
It urged the government, by use
of its federal authority and in
Hoffa Denies
Communist
Associations
WASHINGTON (P) -James R.
Hoffa challenged yesterday the
Communist-dominated tag which
Senate investigators attached to.
some of his labor union allies.
Hoff a, president of the Team-t
sters Union, defended the mutual
assistance pacts his organization
has made with Harry Bridges' west
coast Longshoremeri's Union and
with the Mine, Mill and Smelter
Workers' Union.
"I don't know whether they are
Communist-dominated or not,"
Hoffa told the Senate Internal
Security Subcommittee. He added:
"There will be no pact between
the Teamsters Union and any or-
ganization so convicted."
Chairman James O. Eastland
(D-Miss) called Bridges' union "a
Communist organization" and J.
G. Sourwine, subcommittee coun-
sel, referred to the mine workers
as "Communist-dominated."

its role as the nation's largest em-I
ployer, to help Negroes breakI
away from the "vicious circle of
discrimination in employment op-
portunities."
Lack of opportunity over a long
period, the commission said, even-
tually destroys the desire of many
Negroes to improve their educa-
tional and occupational status.
Describe Status
In a report on employment, the
commission described the situa-
tion this way:
"The Negro is denied, or fails
to apply for, training for jobs . ..
which . . . have traditionally been
denied him; when jobs do become
available, there are consequently
few, if any, qualified Negroes
available to fill them; and often,
because of lack of knowledge of
such newly opened opportunities,
even the few who are qualified
fail to apply."
The commission said the pat-
tern of job discrimination is na-
Air Defenses
To Be Tested
WASHINGTON () - Military
jets will zoom through the skies
in vast numbers today in the big-
gest test yet of North America's
defenses.
During the 12 hours of the test
civilian aircraft are ordered to
stay on the ground.

tionwide, not merely centered in
the South.
Staff director Berl I. Bernhard
said the federal government spends
billions of dollars each year and
creates "innumerable employment
opportunities."
Subsidizes Agencies
He added in a news conference
that the. Federal government sub-
sidizes state employment agencies,
vocational education and other
training programs, sponsors and
advises apprentice training pro-
grams and regulates certain ac-
tivities of labor unions.
It is through these activities
that the commission, in unani-
mous recommendations, urged the
government to act.,.
"Since 1946," Bernhard said,
"such efforts have been confined,
in large measure, to actual federal
employment including membership
in the armed forces, and to em-
ployment by governing contrac-
tors."
The commission urged that
these efforts be expanded to re-
quire equality of opportunity in
all employment supported by gov-
ernment contracts and by grant-
in-aid funds, and also in all vo-
cational education and training
programs so supported.
The Commission said that whlie
the authority of former President
Dwight D. Eisenhower's commit-
tee on Government Contracts was
limited, its efforts had resulted
in Negroes being offered some-jobs
they normally might not be given.

JOB DISCRIMINATION:
Group Asks Government Aid

--AP Wirephoto
BARBED WIRE CURTAIN-West Berliners gaze across into the new forbidden Communist zone where
moments later West Berlin police actively exchanged gunfire with the East Berlin patrols.
U.S. Protests Berlin Gunfire'

f.

ukr'

BERLIN (P-In a sharp protest
to Soviet officials, the United
States yesterday warned "against
the consequences of the reckless
and illegal conduct" of East Ger-
man border guards, a spokesman
said. /
The guards earlier in the day
poured round after round of ma-

chinegun and rifle fire into' Ber-
lin's American sector when nine
truck - borne refugees .b r o k e
through the Communist fence:.
None of the United.States mili-
tary and West Berlin police who
rushed to the wooded scene was
reported hurt in the hour-long

WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP:
Lou wBurn in Effigy
By The Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG-Eric Louw, South Africa's foreign minister,
was burned in effigy yesterday on the steis of Johannesburg ,City
Hall by a crowd of blacks,, Indians and mulattoes who proclaimed on
posters "we support the United Nations censure."
* * * *
ADEN-Imam Ahmed of Yemen announced yesterday he was
abdicating and turning over the throne to his eldest son, Crown
Prince Saif Al Islam Al Badr Mohamed.
NEW YORK-Trading on the New York Stock Exchange was un-
easy yesterday as Standard and Poor's 500 Index closed off .12, with
425 industrials off .14, 25 rails off .15, and 50 utilities up .06.

shooting in early morning half-
light. They did not return the fire.
Gen. Albert Watson II, the Unit-
ed States commandant in Berlin,
drove to Soviet headquarters at
Karlshorst in East Berlin to de-
liver the protest to the Soviet
commandant,. Col. A. I. Solovyev.
The American spokesman said.
Watson "warned against the con-
sequences of the reckless and ille-
gal conduct of the Vopos (East
German People's Police). Gen.
Watson also. protested to the So-
viets about other flagrant inci-
dents which recently affected the,
peace and security of the Ameri-
can sector," the spokesman said.
He added that the protest led
to a back-and-forth discussion
between Watson and Solovyev,
but he gave no indication of the
Russian's reaction..
The Western allies do not rec-
ognize East Germany's Communist
regime and' de.al only with the
Russians in matters involving the
East German police. Soviet offi-
cials usually refer such protests
to the East Germans and take no
other action.

CO MEA

To" I

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Divisionf
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11:00 a.m. Morning prayer and sermon
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month.)
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer
TUESDAY-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRI DAY-
12:10 p.m. Holy Communion followed by
lunch at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 p.m. Daily evening prayer.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John J. Fauser, Assistant
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE:
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M., 12:00
Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon, 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses: 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help,
Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.

r bl Ei

C., r r IcH
S 'Ai Br 3AT i-

r
F

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister,
Rev. Gene Ransorm, Campus Minister
OCTOBER 15, 1961
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. Morning Worship.
"Called of God," Sermon by Dr. Rupert.
The Service is broadcast at 11:15 a.m.
over station WOIA.
10:15 a.m. SEMINAR ON WORLD UNDER-
STANDING: Japan Leader Haruko Tsu-
chiya. Pine Room'
5:30 Fellowship Supper.
7:00 Worship and Program. "What IS the
mission of the Church."-Philip Wilson,
former short term missionary to Malaya.
WEDNESDAYS
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in the, Pine Room.
(Over in time for 8 a.m. classes.)
FRIDAYS
x:30 Wesley Graduate Student Fellowship
dinner followed by program. Philip Wilson
will speak on Malaya. Please phone
8-6881 for reservations by Thursday.
SATURDAY, Oct. 21, 1961
After the Game-Barbeque Supper in Wesley
Lounge for students and Alumni. 50c
THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR
Worship Services:
9:00 Dr. Henry Kuizenga
10:30 Dr. Henry Kuizenga
11:50 Rev. David Van Winkle
Campus Center 1432 Washtenaw:
SUNDAY
9:30-10:20 a.m. Seminar "Scrutinizing the
Christian Faith"
Guild House, 802 Monroe Street
10:30-11:30 a.m. Bible Study "The Book of
Revelation" Presbyterian Campus Center
11:30 a.m. Coffee Hour, Presbyterian Campus
Center
7:00 p.m. "The Remnant" Lutheran Student
Center, NLC, Hill and Forest
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow at Berkshire
Rev. Erwin Goede
Church School 10:30 a.m.
Church Service 11:00 a.m. Sermon Topic: "The
Pearl of Great Price."
7:00 p.m. Student Group, Kalamazoo Room,
League. "The Relevance of Religion on
Campus."
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL.
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
- Rev. Ernest Kaudt, Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 Morning Worship;
7:30 p.m. Slide-talk: Sharon Jeffrey in Guinea
at Guild House, 802 Monroe
NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHAPEL
2250 Fuller Road (Opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmandy 3-2969
William S. Baker, Minister
Morning Worship 10:45 a.m.
Church School and Child Care.

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill Street at S. Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, ,Pastor
Miss Anna Lee, Counselor
Phone: NO 8-7622
SUNDAY-
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Bible Study
11:00 a.m. Worship Service and Communion
7:00 p.m. "The Remnant"-The Rev. Jack
Borckardt; Presbyterian Student Pastor
TUESDAY-
7:15 p.m. Discussion Series on "The Church-
Institution or Movement," Prof. Gerhard
Lenski, Leader
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron - NO 3-9376
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul Light, Campus Minister
Mr. George Pickering, Intern Minister
Sunday:
9:45 a.m. Campus Discussion Class-Golo-
tions j
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship. Sermon: "No
Man to Help," Rev. James Middleton
6:00 P.M. Student Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M. vening Worship, and discussion"
of our Chrition beliefs and how they change.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alyfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Thomas C. Park, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Worship Services,
Sermon by ,the Pastor, "Avoiding Life's
Dead-End Streets"
(Communion in Both Services)
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Study Groups
Sunday at'2:00: Meet at chapel to go to E.
Lansing for joint meeting with MSU Gam-
ma Deltans
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.
For Transportation call NO 2-2756.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Hours are Monday through Sat-
and holidays. Monday evening 7:00 to 9:00
urday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Sundays
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister
Guild House at 524 Thompson
Services 9:30, 10:20, 11:00 a.m.
"BE GLAD YOU ARE YOU," Dr. Fred E. Luchs
preaching
Bible Lecture, 10:20-10:40 Mrs. Luchs
CHURCH SCHOOL: 9:30-10:30, Nursery-High
School
11:00-12:00, Nursery-Kindergarten
STUDENT GUILD: 802 Monroe, telephone
I 2-5 189
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church
Rev. Alvin Hoksbergen, pastor.

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor

10:00 Sunday School
11:00 Morning Worship. "Cure
Habit"
5:30 Student Guild
5:45 Youth Group
7:00TEvening Service. "Thing
Takes"
Wednesday 7 :30 Prayer Meeting

for the Worry

gs that Jesus

Iii

Every Sunday Nursery Provided.
Two Morning Services: 8:45 A.M.
A.M.
Evening 7:00 PM.
Sunday School 10:00 A.M.

and 11:00

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship
7:30 nm. Slide-talk: Sharon Jeffrey in Guinea

UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
YM-YWCA Building 5th Ave.
and East Williams
10:30 a.m. "Help for the Distressed"
6:00 p.m. "Fellowship with God: How is it
Possible?" Keith Hunt, Inter-Varsity
Christian Fellowship Regional Secretary.
7:30 p.m. "Christian Students on Campuses
Around the World" Mr. Hunt, soeaking.

1:11 I

a1

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