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September 23, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDA

Assembly Plans To Broaden Interests

Task Force Available
For Con-Con Delegates'

REED, FELHEIM, SEDER:
OSA Motion Brings Comment

to find out what the women think
but it is difficult," she added.
Outdoor Pep Rally
Further plans include a new
idea in campus dances: Assembly
in cooperation with the Wolverine
Club, will sponsor an outdoor pep
rally and dance at Palmer Field,
from 7:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. Fri-
day.
"The all-campus dance seemed
to be dying, and this is an effort
to reach more people on campus
at one time," Miss Sawyer said.
She added that this dance is a
possible replacement of Assembly's
traditional I-Hop dance. "If this
is a success, we certainly would
consider doing it again," Miss Saw-
yer explained.
To Start Season
The dance will be free and
open to everyone. The pep rally
will highlight the cheerleaders,
the band and the football team. It
will start the football season, as
the first game against UCLA will
take place the next day.
Plans for expansion and intro-
duction of programs within the
residence hall system include lar-1
ger library services, Miss Sawyer
said.
"We are going to expand and
extend our educational programs
with regard to the residence hall
libraries," she said. Women's dor-
mitories on the Hill now each
have a hall library.
Encourage Teas
Assembly also hopes to en-
courage more faculty teas, faculty
dinners and many programs tend-
ing more toward the academic
sphere of the University, she said.
"We feel that there is a trend;
toward the academic in all of the
student's activities on campus to-
day and we are trying to fulfill
this need," she continued.

SALLY JO SAWYER
.. . Assembly head
Another program under con-
sideration is in the field of safety.
"Now that we have developed fire
programs we are going to expand
into the area of safety facilities
for natural disasters," Miss Saw-
yer stated.
Plan Civil Defense
As for civil defense, this will be
the next step in the program, but
much has to be planned before
this will become a reality.
"Of course, our greatest prob-
lem, as' is true with most stu-
dent organizations, is that of com-
munication," she stressed.
The needs and desires of the
women represented must be con-
veyed first to the representatives
and then to the organization, she
explained. "Many girls don't
realize that the major part of the
job is getting and bringing the
ideas to Assembly."

By HARRY PERLSTADT
An 11-man task force has been
quietly gathering information and
contacting resource persons for the
constitutional convention for the
past several months.
The task force, established by
the University during the summer
under the leadership of Prof.
Charles Joiner of the law school,
will be ready to give aid to the
con-con delegates if they request
it.
"If any person from the Univer-
sity is desired by the convent'ion,
we will see when he is available
and make the necessary arrange-
ments," Prof. Joiner said.
Checks Resource Areas
He explained that the task force
is checking into the resource areas
which the con-con might be in-
terested in. "If they come to the
University, we will be ready to
help them," he said.
Earlier ,in the summer Prof.
Joiner had made it clear that the
task force did not intend to in-
trude on the prerogatives of the
convention.
The task force is also co-operat-
ing with the preparatory commis-
sion established by the Legislature
to prepare literature on the various
facets of the issues facing the
convention.
Lihert Asks
New Criteria
For Managers
Managers should be held ac-
countable for developing the hu-
man as well as the economic as-
sets of their organizations, Prof.
Rensis Likert of the psychology
and sociology departments, direc-
tor of the Institute of Social Re-
search, stated in his recently pub-
lished book, "New Patterns of
Management."
A manager's behavior, he noted,
is substantially influenced by the
measurements used by top man-
agement to evaluate the perform-
=ance of individual managers.
Data on production, sales, prof-
its, and the percentage of net
earning to sales, obtained by top
management, is frequently tied to
performance evaluations.
The treatment of human assets
is often ignored, Prof. Likert not-
ed, but these assets, unlike physi-
cal property, can be seriously de-
pleted by poor supervision.
Faced with these absolute stand-
ards of performance, the man-
ager tries to pressure his subordi-
nates rather than build an orga-
nization with minimal turnover.
To correct the wasting of hu-
man assets, Prof. Likert recom-
mends periodic measurement of
the character and quality of the
manager's organization.

i
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PROF. CHARLES JOINER
... aids Con-con

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2

Law Students To View'
Televised Court Sessions
Television cameras will be in-
stalled in Washtenaw County Cir- the door of each of the two Cir-
cuit Court rooms to provide law cuit Court rooms on the second
school students with a view of floor of the county building with
actual courtroom procedure, the cables going across the cor-
The programs will be on closed ridor to a nearby room where
circuit television and will be transmitting equipment will be in-
available only to students of the stalled in an unused phone booth.
school. The circuit will operate from
The project is believed to be the the opening of court until it re-'
first attempted in the country. cesses for the night.
Closed Circuit The judge will have a switch
T Cseds irnit at the bench with which he can
The cameras will transmit pro- turn off the equipment whenever
ceedings on the closed circuit tele- he deems it necessary.
vision "network to a receiver in \T ls qimn
the law choTorClose Equipment
one of the law school buildings. Judge Breakey noted that the
Students, under the guidance of equipment is most likely to be
the law school professors, will get turned off when he clears the
a full view of courtroom activity.curndoff whentators
The project will provide an ed- courtroom of spectators.t
ucational supplement to the train- Tle borne by the isty.
ing of lawyers, Circuit Judge will be borne by the University.
James R. Breakey commented.
He noted that he hasvmet law
graduates who have never beens De i i
in a courtroom before they ap-
peared for admission to the bar. Not Serious'
A camera will be installed over
A R_______ _______ +A r

This information, Prof. Joiner
explained, would be distributed to
the delegates without any partisan
position taken. The material will
be similar to working papers which
examine the issues from all points
of view. ,
Prof. Joiner said the task force
itself would have no interest in
"lobbying" for the University on
such questions as constitutional
status of state-supported colleges.
It would try to find materials on
these problems 'for the delegates
who desired them.
The information which the task
force has varies from the ques-
tion "should the state constitu-
tion be a bare framework for
legislation or a safeguard with
much legislation written into it?"
to why the Michigan constitution
has stateaboundaries included as
the first article.
Boundary Disputed
On the latter, Prof. Joiner ex-
plained that when the Constitu-
tion was written in 1907, Michi-
gan was having a dispute with
Wisconsin over the northwest
boundary. To strengthen its claim,
the Michigan constitutional con-
vention of 1907 wrote into the
document the boundary as Michi-
gan saw it.
Unfortunately Michigan lost the
dispute despite this effort. Prof.
Joiner added that many states do
have the boundaries included, al-
though for differing reasons.
'U' Plans To Hold
Bicycle Auction
The University will hold a bi-
cycle auction from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. today at the bicycle storage
garage located on East Washington
St. just off Forest.
Approximately 200 bicycles that
were impounded before June 18
and unclaimed by Sept. 18 will
be sold.
These bicycles may be examined
from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. today.

(continued from Page 1)
Felheim said his subcommittee
had no objections to having a
member of the original student
group on the study committee or
to having student members re-
port back to the Council.
"As far as we are concerned,
there is no reason our report
should not be made public," he
said. "We were always willing to
have it made public, but since
our original report was to Vice-
President Lewis and the Senate
Advisory Committee, it was not
our report to release."
The subcommittee also support-
ed SGC's statement questioning
the establishment of the study
committee.
"We too question the nature and
function of a committee which
has no responsibility to the fac-I
ulty and students but reports only
to Vice-President Lewis," Prof.'
Felheim said.
Will Review
He stressed that the findings
of the study committee will in
any case be reviewed by his sub-
committee, since it was the orig-
inal advisory committee to Lewis.
SGC's motion has included a
request for such a review.
James Seder, '64L, a member of
the original student group which
compiled information on OSA
DIAL NO 5-6290
e) +ection n modern coolin-
'Not
missed'
HARPERS BAZAAR
'ELICIOUS' N..TImES
POI'le cIkpr

stressed the importance of hav-
ing one of that group serve on
the study committee.
Background
Seder said, "For a number of
years, many students holding re-
sponsible positions in student
government have been concern-
ed with several aspects of OSA.
"Part of this concern was foc-
used upon the policies and mode
of operation of one individual.
Over the years,.stories and rumors,
had been circulated which dealt
with the actions of this individ-
ual.
"Vice-President Lewis took the
position that he would disapprove
strongly of these actions and poli-
cies if they were true. But he
Trial Postponed
In Robbery Case
The appearance of David A.
Nash in Ann Arbor Circuit Court,
on charges of having robbed the
Alpha Chi Sigma fraternity house,
has been delayed until Sept. 29. '

said he could not act-and should
not act-on rumors.
"Encouraged by a number of
faculty members, we believed we
had a responsibility to the stu-
dent body and the entire Univer-
sity community to attempt to de-
termine whether these stories were
true or unfounded.
"The facts we collected were
turned over to Lewis and the stu-
dent relations subcommittee for
their consideration.
Report Helpful
"Our report has, as we hoped,
sparked some interest in the wid-
er problem of the general direc-
tion in which OSA is heading.
"Since the object of the com-
mittee is to be oriented toward a
thorough analysis of the entire
area of student affairs, rather
than just a consideration of our
report, we see no reason why it
would be inappropriate for any
of us to serve on the study comn-
mittee,
"In fact, we believe we might
make several valuable contribu-
tions to the study.",

S. G. C.
TONIGHT and Sunday
at7 and 9
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'I The Se" (______________
GILBERT & V
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SUN DAY, SEPT.24 7:00 P.M.
Room 3c Union
Work On: Publicity, Costumes, Programs, Crew, Cast
EVERYONE WELCOME

a u o wam overnment Coun-
cil-Wolverine Club debt of "ap-
proximately $1,100" .for the pur-
chase of new capes, cards and
poster boards for Block M was
described as "not too serious" by
Judith Caplan, '61, SGC-Wolver-
ine Club president.
During the summer the club was
faced with a choice of either
"folding up" or purchasing the
essential and new equipment,
Block 'M' chairman Danny Stone,
'63, said. The club was unable to
obtain either University or local
sponsorship at that time.
"Wolverine Club has every in-
tention of attempting to pay its
own debts," Miss Caplan said.
The debt, for which SGC is ul-
timately responsible, came up for
discussion at the Wednesday night
meeting of the Council..

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