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September 22, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SGC HASH:
Asks Deadline for.

PSYCHOLOGICAL INSTRUCTION-The newly installed dial-selectors and monitoring system in the
language laboratory are part of a new teaching program which emphasizes conditioned behavior in
language learning. Lingual experts from a remote monitoring booth can listen to a student and
serve to reinforce him as he responds correctly.
Dial-Selector To Aid Language Learning

By CAROLYN WINTER
The first 'dial-selector and
monitoring system in the nation
for language learning will be put
to use at the University this. fall.
This system was to be installed
last fall, but technical difficulties
delayed its completion. In Feb-
ruary 1961, three test booths were
installed. ' This fall forty-five
booths are being operated with the
new dial-selector. There are 150
booths in the lab, leaving' 105
seats in which the system is not
yet installed.
The equipment for the system is
sensitive and complex. This ac-
counts for the difficulty in in-
stallation. The earphones are the
latest type used anywhere and
have high fidelity characteristics.
Only recently have they been pro-
duced in quantity.
Accounts for Difficulty
Occasional difficulties in ser-
vice of the equipment is partially
due to unfamiliarity with it on
the part of the student. Every
booth has an instruction sheet
to explain how to use the appartus
correctly and monitors are there
to help at all times. I
The dialing system is similar to
using a telephone. The student
dials numbers and by his selec-
tion of numbers chooses his pro-
gram.
There is also a new monitoring
system, which is only partially in
efect now, by which trained lin-
guists in a remote monitoring
booth can listen to each student's
circuit and carry on a two-way
conversation in order to correct
an error.
Dean of the literary college

Roger Heyns, in his annual report
to President Harlan Hatcher,,said
the dial-selector system "offers
a definite teaching advantage as
it enables each student to proceed
at his own pace, dialing a new
program only after he has master-
ed the preceding one."
Qudruples Programs
Another advantage, he men-
tioned, was that it quadruples the
number of programs that can be
played simultaneously. Students
will be able to hear any one of over
2,500 individual language tapes.
Since there is a central control
room- in which all the tapes are
played, one can be selected sim-
ultaneously by a number of stu-
dents.
In cooperation with the'labora-
tory, research is being done to-
ward native mastery of foreign
language by the new Institute for
Behavioral Research And Pro-
grammed Instruction under the
direction of Prof. F. Rand Morton
and aided by a staff of linguists,
psychologists and educators.
Their research is- being done to
discover "methods of conditioning
behavior in learning language,"
acting director of the language
laboratory, Erwin M. Hamson said.
Student Reinforcement
Applied to the language lab,
this means that the student will be
reinforced as he responds cor-
rectly. The questions are so ar-
ranged that the student will build
up knowledge, answer each ques-
tion right, and in turn be stimu-
lated. This is somewhat in prac-
tice already in the lab in the
French, German, Latin, Russian

and Spanish programs, Hamson
noted.
The researchers are seeking
practical ways of using the prin-
ciple of reinforcement to teach
the student to discriminate be-
tween sounds that are difficult
to distinguish in a foreign lan-
guage.
The research has no connection
with the use of the language lab
by University language students.
The results of this research will
eventually be used in language
teaching throughout the nation.
SGC Offers
Reading ,List
Student Government Council,
has announced the plans for its
fall Reading and Discussion Pro-
gram.
Seminars, focusing upon six
areas of cultural interest, will be
led by members of the faculty.
Under the category of Utopian
Literature, Prof. Kenneth Bould-
ing of the economics department,
Prof. James Gindin of the Eng-
lish department, and Assistant
Dean of Men John Bingley, will
lead a seminar focusing upon
George Orwell's "Nineteen-Eighty-
Four." The discussion will be held
at 7:15 p.m. Wednesday in the
Honors Lounge of the UGLI.
Other seminars planned for the
semester include: Science and
Culture, "Two Cultures and the
Scientific Revolution," by Sir C.
P. Snow; Psychology of Religion,
"The Future of an Illusion," by
Sigmund Freud; Ayn Rand's
Philosophy, "The Fountainhead,"
by Ayn Rand; E. E. Cummings,
"100 Poems," by E. E. Cummings;
Modern Marxism, "To the Finland
Station," by Edmund Wilson.
Eugenia Pann, '63, chairman of
the Reading and Discussion Com-
mittee, urges all students to at-
tend these seminars, especially if
they have read the primary books.
"It is a good opportunity to meet
some of the professors you will
encounter in the next four years
and to hear their ideas," she told
freshmen.

At Wednesday's Student Gov-
ernment Council meeting, a letter
from the Committee on Member-
ship in Student Organizations was.
read which requested that SGC
establish a definite time limit for
organizations to submit their
constitutional membership claus-
es.
These by-laws, along with their
interpretations, are to be turned
into the office of James A. Lewis,
vice-president for student affairs.
SGC President Richard Nohl,
'62BAd, was directed to invite
Jesse McCorry, '62, acting chair-
man of the Committee on Mem-
bership, to speak to the Council
at its next meeting.
In other action, SGC passed a
motion to cancel the late-closing
hours of student-sponsored orga-
nizations on Oct. 7. However, it
extended late-closing hours to 1
a.m. on Oct. 14 and on Oct. 21,
Homecoming night, till 2 a.m.
To Serve on Council
On a motion by Per Hanson,
'62, SGC appointed Assembly As-
sociation President Sally JoSaw-
yer, '62, and Brian Glick, '62, to
serve on the Interviewing Com-
mittee for the two Council vacan-
cies available due to the resigna-
tion of Mary Wheeler, L, and Phil-
ip Power, Spec.
The students selected will fill
these posts only until the next
SGC election. The committee was
advised to proceed immediately
and report to the Council at its
next meeting.
A motion to hold the fall elec-
tion for SGC on Nov. 7-8 was
adopted. An amendment by Rog-
er Seasonwein, Grad, added that
petitioning be opened following
the next meeting.
The Council is investigating the
$1,300 debt incurred by the Wol-
verine Club due to the purchase of
new 'M' cards. It is also looking
into the possibilities of holding'
the 16th National Student Asso-
ciation Congress at the Univer-
sity in 1963.
The Michigan region of NSA
will meet at the TJniversity from
Oct. 27-29.
Housing for delegates will be
Plan Meeting
For Rushees
Fraternity rush will begin with
a mass rush meeting in the Mich-
igan Union ballroom Wednesday
evening at 7:00 p.m. Bob Peterson,
'62, Interfraternity Council Presi-
dent, said yesterday.
Actual rushing will begin Sun-
day, Oct. 1, with open house at
all the fraternities. Open house
will continue for three days after
which there will be lunches and
smokers for the rest of the week.
The second week will consist
of lunches and smokers, starting
Monday, Oct. 9 and ending Sun-
day Oct. 18.
Band To Present
Review of Tour
The Michigan Marching Band
will present a review of their tour
through the Soviet Union during
the half-time of the Michigan-
Michigan State game on Oct. 14,
conductor William D. Revelli an-
nounced:
To be viewed over coast-to-
coast television, the show will
open with an airplane formation,
showing the way the band travel-
ed to Russia.
Later in the show an old-fash-
ined train formation will demon-
strate how the group got around
within the country.
Russian music is to be featured
throughout the show. The band
will play "The Great Gate of

Kiev" from Mussorgsky's "Pictures
at an Exhibition," as well as
"Meadowland," a Russian folk
song.
Another highlight of the pres-
entation will be a Cossack dance
executed by members of the band.
Schorger To Talk
At Club Meeting
The Near East Club will hold
a meeting at 8 p.m. today in the
Rackham West Conf. Rm. Dr.
William Schorger will discuss
"Why Study the Near East?"

arranged through Interquadrangle
Council and Assembly Associa-
tion. Meals will be served at the
Union, and the meetings will be
held in the SAB.
The Council approved the In-
dia Student Association dance
program to be held Oct. 11 at Ann
Arbor High School.
It also approved the appoint-
ment of Barbara Postle, '63, as of-
fice manager.
The full text of the motion pass-
ed by Student Government Coun-
cil Wednesday concerning student,
participation on the Study Com-
mittee on the Structure of the
Office of Student Affairs is as
follows:
"Student Government Council
desires to appoint four students
as full voting members of the
Study Committee on- Structure of
the Office of Student Affairs and
notes having received recom-
mendations as to appointing stu-
dents to that end from Vice-Pres-
ident James A. Lewis.
Membership Requirements
"All members shall be from the
Student Government Council, two
coming from the Committee on
the University and two from the
Council at large. - At least one
member of each sex shall be in-
cluded in the group.'
"Student Government Council
will instruct the delegates to re-
port back to the Council in pub-
lic session at regular intervals on
the progress of the study.
"Student Government Council.
does not by this action imply en-
dorsement of the present arrange-
ment in which the study commit-
tee functions outside the normal

By-Laws
advisory channels of the Univer-
sity. SGC. in fact, questions the
advisability of this arrangement.
,By appointing members to serve
on the committee the Council does
not commit itself to support the
committee's final recommenda-
tions.
"SGC recognizes and shall ful-
fill its own responsibility to de-
bate fully all relevant issues, to
initiate proposals, and to review,
evaluate and comment upon the
recommendations submitted by
the study committee.
SGC Recommendation
"In view of the fact that the
study committee has been pre-
sented with the report from the
Student Relations Committee and
has been appraised of all facts
regarding the initiation of the
study, SGC recommends that one
member of the original study
group serve as an ex-officio mem-
ber without vote. That original
study group included the 1961
Daily senior staff and the 1961
SGC Human Relations Board.
"Recognizing that the educa-
tional responsibility of the Uni-
versity rests, ultimately with the
faculty, SGC recommends strong-
ly that the findings of the study
committee be reviewed by the
University Senate sub-committee
on student relations.
"SGC mandates its Committee
on the University to ,compile in-
formation relating to the Office
of Student Affairs and to trans-
mit it to the Council in order that
members may be better informed.
To this same end SGC requests
that Vice-President Lewis make
available to Council members' the
full report of the Student Rela --_
tions Committee on the Office of
Student Affairs.
"SGC further requests that the
minutes of the study committee
be transmitted in confidence to
the SGC Committee on the Uni-
versity."
Washtenaw
Young Republican Club
presents
DIXIELAND
JAZZ
' with the
BOLL WEEVIL
JASS BAN D
TONIGHT - rain or shine

7:30

Sunday, Septerber 24
Union Ballroom
* Michigan Union Show Ko-Eds Too!

We cordially invite everyowze to
WHEN: ' Fri., Sept. 22 at
WHERE: 802 Monroe
Congregational, Disciples, E

SOPH SHOW
MASS MEETING'
7:30

MUSKET'
Mass Meeting

4

Sept. 27

League Ballroom

Expand Class
In Chemistr y
Provisions have been made to
accommodate most of the students
desiring to take organic chemis-
try this fall, Prof. Leigh Ander-
son, chairman of the chemistry
department, said yesterday.
More than 290 students signed
up at registration last week, and
there were only places for 150,
Prof. Anderson explained. This
mis-estimate was due to a larger
number of students choosing to
take this course than was antici-
pated.
Since the course is a require-
ment of all pre-medical, pharma-
cy and other science students, ac-
commodations were made imme-
diately. New laboratories were
opened, new equipment ordered,
and additional faculty was trans-
ferred to the organic chemistry
classes. The lecture section was
moved to a larger room so that
the 290 students could meet in
the same lecture, he said.
The large number of students
enrolling in organic chemistry oc-
curred even though it is now a
two-semester course instead of
the previous one-semester course,
Prof. Anderson said.

r
>I
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7 mi. N.E. of
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Bring your ID
Come early, open 8:00

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HOT MUSIC
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Sept. 22

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Sept. 23
3rd Floor, SAB

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