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September 19, 1961 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Gl

rr"v+. MICR V-AN IMALIiXI

. Zr. m D a, nURE t i t 1A D jIYTUES

MY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1961

A ~ <~ Ai'Union of 6'oie6- 6ocil4E R~ep zz ks
k. SAPAI 12 d'u.t r"KUi
4' is 71 >,s T
SOVIET POWER-Above is a map of what is known about Soviet Union's missile deployment. Unted States sources have learned loca-
tions of launch sites for intercontinental and intermediate range ballistic missiles, as well as those of some production and training
centers
EXperts Etimate Soviet Nuclear Power

e

By CHARLES STAFFORD
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
The Soviet missile arsenal,
poised to throw a nuclear punch
at the United States and its allies
in the event of war, is formidable.
Though most of the missile
launching pads, and the missile
production, development and
training center are in western
Russia, still they form a protective
ring around . the rim of that
sprawling nation of 81/2 million
square miles. One launching site
is just across the Bering Sea from
Alaska.
United States military leaders
have information on the location
of about 35 long-range missile
launching pads, according to a
recent issue of "Military Review,"
a magazine published by the
United State Army Command and
It' s Teri
It's FRE
It's the bes
you HAVE
at the QUA[

General Staff College at Ft.
Leavenworth, Kansas. At least 10
of these are said to be homes of
the 8,000-mile T3, an interconti-
nental ballistics missile (ICBM)
that carries a thermonuclear war-
head.
Estimates Capacity
The magazine estimates that
the Russians have about 50 ICBMs
and intermediate range missiles
(IRBMs), with a capacity for plac-
ing 200 on the launching pads by
the end of winter.
The magazine said the informa-
tion had been compiled from un-
classified sources, adding: "Be-
cause of a tight Soviet control
over military information, this
data is derived from sources which
are not necessarily accurate or
complete."

In the Soviet army, the maga-
zine said, the strategic missilesI
forces are on a separate but equal
footing with the ground forces, air
forces and air defense forces. The
missiles command is under the
control and direction of Marshall
Kirill Moshalenko.
In addition to the fixed missile
launching sites, the magazine said,,
"there is some evidence that the
USSR is prepared to fire strategic
missiles from mobile launchers
mounted on rail cars."
Rail-Mounted
The rail-mounted missile is be-
lieved to be the T4A, capable of
carrying a payload of 3,100 poundsI
and presumably with a range of at
least 1,500 miles.
In addition to the T4A and the
T3, the. arsenal includes two other

intermediate range missiles, the
T2 and T4.
The launching sites are widely-
dispersed and located strategically
to threaten all the western na-
tions. In western Russia a concen-
tration of them faces Europe. An-
other concentration in northern
Russia is pointed across the polar
region toward the United States.
A heavy concentration is situated
on the Sakhalin Islands, due north
of Japan. There are even sites on
the southern border of Russia.
Most of the production and de-
velopment centers are in western
Russia.
By comparison to the estimate
that the Russians have about 50
missiles on the launching pads,
the United States is reported to
haveabout 60 missiles ready to
shoot.
'U' Playerse

Emphasized The newest edition
of a college tradition \
By FacultyT
LOOMED FROM NATURE'S COLORS
By ELLEN SILVERMAN
At the University a student is
only Miss Smith or Mr. Jones to
the faculty and consequently will
be treated that way, Prof. Marvin
Felheim, of the English depart-
ment, told incoming freshmen last
week.
The faculty, he stressed, is not
interested in family background
sorority or fraternity affiliation or
any other background of any stu-
dent.
"The faculty is only interested
ini a student's mind and what he
will do with it while he is here,
he said.
Prof. Felheim said that the in-
coming student is faced with the
problem of four courses, each of $ 9
which is considered most impo"HIALEAH"
tant by the professor teaching it.
"The most important single fac CAMPUS TESTEDI CAMPUS APPROVED
tor about University life is the
mind of the student. This is the
last time he will be able to be
challenged to his highest capacity REGIMENTED STRIPES in a color parade of deep to light, that spotlight the season's newest
and the faculty is interested -in
seeing that this is accomplished," fashion hues.-Rates straight A's for smart good looks, rugged wear, real value. Gives a dorm
he said. nook a bright look in no time . .. Rich twill texture adds depth and dimension . . . gives you
Prof. Felheim said that he felt the fun of carefree daily use. It's mussproof, washable, needs no ironing, and keeps color-
that the University's prime funs-
tion was dealing with the mind fresh through years of laundering.
and not, as some believe, also COLORS: BROWN, GREEN, and RED.
molding men and women.
"If you are not now a man or a
woman or have not been brought See our selection of other BATES BEDSPREADS in smart color combinations in plaids, solid
up to be one, get out," he said.colors, and novelty designs . . .from $5.98 up.
versity are selected most carefully
and represent the highest in schol-
arship from American high schools.
But when a student comes to Other Student-Room Furnishings in a wide range of prices: BLANKETS, COMFORTERS,
this University, the faculty does BED and SOFA PILLOWS, SCATTER RUGS, LAUNDRY-SHOE and GARMENT-BAGS,
not carehwhat ;he did in high SHEETS and PILLOW CASES, BATH TOWELS, CURTAINS and DRAPES, ready-made
school, they want only to know :
what he does in his classes now or by the yard.
To the faculty, Prof. Felheim
said, what goes on outside of class
means little. It is only what goes
on within the academic commu-
nity that means anything, since
this is the main purpose of the INC.
ti ist e m i pup s of te"fraternity of scholarship."
1265 S. Main St. Ph. NO 2-3184
Washtenaw County's largest DRY GOODS store
Store Hours: MONDAYS and FRIDAYS 9 to 8:30
Sets Auditions Tues., Wed., Thurs., to 5:30
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The University Men's Glee Club
will hold try-outs and the frst
meeinzof t-,inshtnihdi

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To VISIT the cosmetic counter
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For the FIRST 500 smart gals that bring in
this ad the Quarry has a purse size "L'Air
du Temps" PERFUME, bottled and imported
by Nina Ricci.

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The University Players will open
their season at 8:00 p.m. Oct. 25
in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theater
with a production of Franz Kaf-
ka's "The Trial."
An adaptation of the novel, "The
Trial" takes place in a world where
a man is assumed guilty until he
can prove his innocence. It is a
man's trial for a nameless crime
before an invisible but all-power-
ful judge who examines the con-
cepts of guilt and punishment.
Following Kafka's play, which
closes Oct. 28, the Players will
present George Bernard Shaw's
"Arms and the Man." Running
from Nov. 8-11, "Arms and the
Man" poi'trays barbarians striv-
ing to be civilized and argues that
the brave soldier is merely fool-
hardyand the good soldier is a
coward trying only to save his
own neck.
Another view of war will appear
in Shakespeare's "Henry IV, Part
I," Dec. 6-9 and 11 and 12. This
play, as well as "Part II," to be
given as the closing production of
this season May 7-12, will be pre-
sented in Trueblood Aud., which
will be specially remodeled with
an extended Elizabethan - style
stage.
Also to be produced in Trueblood
Aud. is the premiere production of
Barton Wimble's "Faces of Malte"
Jan. 10-13. Suggested by Rainer
Marie Rilke's "Malte Laurids
Brigge," the play witnesses the
torment of a dying Danish boy in
search of salvation.

second season at 7:30 tonight in
Rm. 3-R of the Michigan Union.
Auditions will be under the su-
pervision of glee club director Prof.
Philip A. Duey and are open to any
male student of the University.

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But, you'll like many, many of the things you
see at the Quarry.
the wIturinc.
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Open Daily 8:30 a.m. 'il 9:30 p.m.
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SUNDAY HOURS 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Phones: Rx NO 3-4121-Photo NO 3-1991-Surgical Supply NO 5-6127
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Vertical Bookcase
Consists of 7-20"PaelS,
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Bases, Assembled Size
601f Hx20 L
Television and
noner Unit/Bofcat
Consists of 6.30"M-
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6.20"1 Panels, 8*aas&
Assem~bled Size
Horizontal Bookcase
Consists of 11-3011P Me%~
6 Wood Bases. Assemled@
Size 30"1 H x 63" L

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Tragedy follows a love affair be-I
tween a young girl and an olderi
married man in Graham Greene's
'The Living Room"''to be given by
the Players March 21-24.
All performances will be given at
8:00 p.m. in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater except for the three plays
scheduled for Trueblood Aud. Sea-
son tickets may be purchased at
the Lydia Mendelssohn box office.
Tickets for individual productions
will go on sale Oct. 23.

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By combining just 4 panel sizes in satin black
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the number of arrangements you can design to fit
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Consists of 1124# Pe
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size SONH250f.
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Complete explanation of opportunities in SGC Com-
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interesting assignments from which to choose.

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