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September 19, 1961 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 11

THE MICHIGAN F DAI 1 JVL Y USA, ETMER1,1

Continuing Crisis
Nest 0 1 2 3
The 6.%.&.4
and EAST MILES
Sf GERMANY
EAST
for-
lays Have,-Q Hermsdor GERMANY
The Canat EAST ~,
3er- Tege
East Fores v.BERLIN
;aes Spandau T e r "
vent Forest --
and ° \ Pankow"
ason TEPANAU _TEGEL Breir tg
S AIRPORT *IrStrp
on BRANDENBURGs
be- - rRGARTE-ERGAR GATE.-
the Jreld Friedrichf
the
ion. POTSDAMER.
ne- runewald PLA TZ
-up G /' Forest I'
GAT OI+W a
ugh AIRPORT TEMPEJHOF OHANNISTHA L ..
has c/AIRPORT AIRPORT-
an WEST A.an
Sting -% -BERLIN si~9
has
with
in a EA ST GER YA NY
ting
tac-
DIVIDED CITY-Shading marks the border between East and West Berlin. When Communist
leaders closed the border to the flood of refugees, as many as 5,000 per day were leaving the eastern
sector.

EDUCATIONAL CHALLENGE:
Copley Views Gifted Student

By CAROLINE DOW
The major problem facing
United States education today is
the instruction of the superior and
talented student, Prof. Frank 0.
Copley of the classical studies de-
partment states in his book pub-
lished last week concerning the
education of the talented student.
The need for trained intellectu-
als for the future is important
because "we haye come to realize
that without intellectual leaders
democracy cannot hope to sur-
vive," Prof. Copley says in "The
American High School and the
Talented Student" released by the
University Press.
Democracy owes the gifted child
the same opportunity it owes to
all, the opportunity to develop its
fullest potential through educa-
tion, he believes.
Strike Balance
The book studies the aspects of
striking a balance between the
cost of special programs for the
talented students and the waste
of American brainpower through
the lack of them.
Prof. Copley discusses the edu-
cational issues surrounding the
academically talented: who de-
serves it; suiting the program to
both the child and the school;
and discussion of the fallacies in
educating the gifted.
The second half of the book
centers on advice to schools and
students on the place and use of
Advanced Placement Examinations
in the high school. Throughout
the book, Prof. Copley bases his
suggestions on the premise that
intellectually talented students
tend to be equally talented soci-

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PROF. FRANK COPLEY
... gifted students

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ally and better adjusted emotion-
ally. They are better able to takeI
greater studious concentration1
than their contemporaries.1
Special Treatment
That academically talented stu-
dents should get special treatment
is never disputed by Prof. Copley,
However, the distinguishing of
these students and type of care is
carefully weighed.
In the search for creative minds,
Prof. Copley would trust human
understanding of the student as
well as tests. He would look for
future intellectual leaders "not
only among the happy, well-ad-
justed, efficient youngsters who
win all honors, but also among the
dirty and unkempt, the socially
unacceptable, the wild and ob-

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POLICE PROTECTION-East German police protect workers building the concrete block wall
which divides the East and West sections of the city along the sector line. The wall was constructed
when the barbed wire obstacle failed to prevent passage.

1! "
Thek
Serving the Community for Better Health c'
During your stay in A nn Arbor
VILLAGE .tPOTHSCARY
your Drug Store
We will .go out of our way to please you.
PRESCRIPTIONS
MEDICINALS
COSMETICSz
LIQUOR, BEER, WINE
Delivery-Charge Accounts
Open from 9 A.M. to 1 1 P.M.
1112 S. University Ave. NO 3-5533
c..m m m.m mmm".m ~ :

reperous, the one-track minds
nd even the scholastic failures.
Once the students are chosen,
chools should not just speed up
he class schedule without gear-
ig the course to minds that
an take greater depth, as well as
peed. Nor should schools stress
ritical thinking without giving
he student a respect for the basis
f thought: facts.
Knowledge First
"Knowledge must precede criti-
ism," Prof. Copley stresses. And
e fears that too often a school,
n an effort to spark up classes,
'ill go beyond the factual knowl-
dge in discussion. This may "give
he student a false impression of
he nature of the learning pro-
ess."
When instructors skip "tiresome
etails," they handicap the stu-
ent, as learning actually requires
ndless memorization and disci-
'line for "the learner will never
lave time for the final step to
nderstanding if he must forever
e running to his reference books."
Must Choose
On the choice between accelera-
ion and individuals, enrichment
or individual or class courses and,
r ability grouping of gifted stu-
lents, Prof. Copley finds that the
hoice should be made within the
ontext of the school.
Special classes or work should be
directed toward the advanced
placement program, Prof. Copley
recommends. Advanced placement
allows students to do college cali-
ber work in a high school social
environment, and perhaps even
receive credit for such in college.
Stresses Waste
The background for this book is
a series of three experiments spon-
sored by the Fund for the Ad-
vancement of Education. The first
documented the waste and dupli-
cation that occurs when strong
schools offer challenging programs
and these efforts become dupli-
cated in the first years of college.
The second experiment showed
that early admission to college was
feasible emtionally for the able
student but that better results
came when the student remained
with students of his own age. The
third study gave birth to the Ad'-
vanced Placement Program by
finding .the compromise of college
work in a high school environ-
ment.
Prof. Copley cautions adminis-
trators that students should not
be penalized for taking advanced
courses by grading them on a
curve. This will lessen his chances
for scholarships and college en-
trance by offering a chance of
lower grade than in an easier
course and discourage his Intellec-
tual zest.
Grade Preoccupation
Although "preoccupation with
grades is one of the worst features
of contemporary American educa-
tion and has fostered the growth
of the "grade-getter" . . . colleges
have done little to combat this.
phenomenon .."
Until educators find realistic
measures to demonstrate the pres-
ence of intellectual powers, "it is
worse than futile to blame either
students or teachers if they are
more preoccupied than they should
be with grading systems.
Cinema Guild
Sets Petitions'
The Student Government Coun-
cil Cinema Guild Board has
announced petitioning forspon-
sorship of movies by campus
organizations.
Petitions are available on the
first floor of the Student Activities
Building and are due completed,
together with a financial report,
by Friday.
Interviews will be held from 9-
12 a.m. and 2-4 p.m. on Saturday
and from 10-12 a.m. on Sunday.

-d

WIRE BARRIER-Barbed wire surrounds the Brandenburg Gate-once a symbol of the German
hope for reunification. The wire is viewed from the western sector looking toward East Berlin.

S--~im

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