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February 17, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-02-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SEE NEW CHOICES:
Name- Department Chairmen
- - -- -

Continued from Page 1)
Prof. Haber on his "dis-
ed record as a teacher,
ator' and public servant.
tribution to the University
ni invaluable."
Orren C. Mohler of the
my department, director of
Vlath-Hulbert Observatory,
pointed chairman of that
ient and director of Uni-
observatories for five
Wide Contacts
Heyns' report to the Re-
>ted that Prof. Mohler 'hasj

an international reputation as a
solar astronomer and has wide
contacts within astronomy."
It further pointed out that the
University had been attempting
for some time to replace Prof.
Leo Goldberg, who resigned the
chairmanship in 1959 to go to
Harvard University. The post has
been vacant ever since.m
Dean Heyns reported that Prof.
'Mohler "had been, overlooked, in
his isolated spot at Lake Angeles,
as a possibility,"and for that rea-
son wasn't recommended until
now.
Successor to Katz
Prof. Stuart W. Churchill of the
engineering college was appointed
chairman of the chemical engi-
n e e r i n g department, effective
March 1, to succeed Prof. Donald
I. Katz, who asked to be relieved
of the. job.
In his communication to the
Regents, Dean S. Atwood of the
engineering college assured the
Board that "under Prof. Church-
ill's leadership, the department is
certain to retain its high stand-
ing and continue to lead in the
work of teaching and research..."
The Regents also reappointed
Prof. George W. Hay as chairman
of the mathematics department
for another five-year term.
Streamlining
Dean Heyns reported that Prof.
Hay "has been instrumental in

Niehuss Set
To Assume
New Duties
(Continued from Page 1)
of his particular administrative
skills to serve the University."
Absence of Difficulty
Regent Power also commended
Dean Heyns for his fairness. "Un-
der his leadership, I have noticed
an absence of difficulty in the lit-
erary college," he said. "It is good
that the whole faculty will benefit
by this skill."
Regent Carl Brablec of Roseville
commented that heretofore "the
by-laws have not provided the
President with a competent dep-
uty. I'm glad this has been reme-
died."
In other action, the Regents
awarded the contract for the con-
struction of the Thompson Street
Parking Garage to J. A. Fredman,
Inc. of Detroit.
Building Cost
The budget -for the structure
was set at $1.1 million. It will be
located on the corner of Thomp-
son and Jefferson Streets, just
across from the Student Activi.
ties Bldg.
Pierpont also announced that
the architects, Meathe, Kessler
and Associates have met with the
planning committee for the Wash-
tenaw Terrace Apartments, a
projected unit on Washtenaw Ave-
nue for married students.

DISCUSS STRUCTURE:
Inadequate Attendance
Hampers Council Retreat

By MARJORIE BRAHMS
Inadequate attendance and lack
of direction hampered the Stu-
dent Government Council retreat
last week, League President Bea
Nemlaha, '62, reported.
The retreat at the Fresh Air
Camp was originally planned by
Miss Nemlaha and Administrative
Vice-President Robert Ross, '63,
in an attempt to solve "confusion
and conflict" between Council
members.
The planners felt informal dis-
cussion on Council's aims and
present shortcomings would help
understanding between Council
members and speed legislation.
Restructuring of Council into a
three-part organization to be com-
Hospital Seeks
Blood Donors

PROF. STUART CHURCHILL
... new appointment
the appointment of several dis-
tinguished and established mathe-
maticians and has reorganized ad-
ministrative operations of the de-
partment to increase their effi-
ciency."
Prof. Hay was additionally cited
for effectively "increasing faculty
participation in matters of cur-
riculum and academic adminis-
tration."
Also in the mathematics depart-
ment, Prof. Bernard A. Galler was
named acting director of the Com-
puting Center for the current se-
mester, during the sabbatical
leave of Prof. R. C. F. Bartels of
the same department.

posed of faculty, students and ad-
ministration, was the main topic
of discussion. The consensus
among Council members present
at the retreat was that Council
does not have the best possible
structure, Miss Nemlaha said.
At present there is no con-
tinuity of Council membership
because the Council body is con-
stantly changing. SGC has little
contact with the faculty, admin-
istration and students; it is out-
side the power structure of the
University and thus is ineffective.
Executive Vice-President John
Martin, '62, commented that the
tripartite system would enable
SGC to function more competently
because administrators and fac-
ulty would be able to work with
students on the Council.
"The retreat was disappointing
because of attendance and direc-
tion problems, as well as difficulty
in recognizing common concerns
and a tendency toward partisan-
ship,'' Ross noted.
Miss Nemlaha thought the re-
treat was partially successful be-
cause many questions were brought
up for later consideration.

I

III

7

OF. ORREN MOHLER
astronomy head

CANT ABSENCE LEAVES:
Regents Approve Faculty Appointments

lhe Regents yesterday approved
oointments and leaves of ab-'
ce of faculty members.
rof. Bradford Perkins, cur-
tiy at the University of Cali-
nia at Los Angeles, was named
professor of history for the
2-63 academic year.
rof. Walter G. Kell of the
iness administration school re-
ed a promotion from visiting
fessor of accounting to profes-
of accounting, beginning next
Name Wheeler
,ichard S. Wheeler- was ap-
ited an assistant professor in
political science department
inning with the fall semester.
is at present a visiting pro-
or at Duke University.
ens C. Zorn, now teaching at
e University, was named an as-
ant professor of physics for
e years beginning next fall.
rof. John M. Trytten was ap-
ited a lecturer in business edu-
on for the coming summer ses-
1.
Committees
a committee appointments,
f. William J. Schlatter was
ied to the executive committee
the business administration
ool until June 30, 1963. He
complete the unexpired term
Prof. James D. Scott, of the
e school.
rof. Robert S. Fox of the edu-
on school and Prof. James N.
'gan, director of the Survey
earch Center, were reappointed
three-year terms to the execu-
committee of the Institute for
nan Adjustment.

Prof. H. Richard Crane of the
physics department was placed on
the executive board of the grad-
uate school for this semester, suc-
ceeding Prof. Robert C. F. Bartels,
who is on leave from the mathe-
matics department.
Board Appointment
The charter of the Development
Council was amended to increase
the Board of Directors by one
member. Prof. Merwin H. Water-
'man of the business administra-
tion school was appointed.
Appointed to the Board of Gov-
ernors of Religious Affairs were
the following: Prof. Gordon J. Van
Wylen, chairman of the mechani-
cal engineering department, Prof.
John W. Henderson of the Medi-
cal School and Prof. Paul G. Kau-
per of the Law School to complete

the term of Prof. George Menden-
hall of the Near Eastern Studies
department, who has become an
ex-officio member of the board.
Prof. Richard K. Beardsley of
the anthropology, department re-
ceived an appointment to the
executive committee of the Cen-
ter for Research on Economic
Development, succeeding Prof.
Robert E. Ward, who is on leave
from the political science depart-
ment.
Museum Staff
Off-campus assignments were
granted to the following Museum
of Zoology staff members: Henry
van der Shalie, curator of mol-
lusks, John Burch, research as-
sociate and Theodore Hubbell,
director.

'U' Scientists Cite Method
Of Studying Hay Fever

Three University meteorologistsv
have developed a means of pre-
dicting how bad the annual hay
fever season will be.
Through the use of weather
records and pollen counts over the
past 16 years, plus the assistance
of a probability theory and a
large computer, they have dis-
covered certain weather factors
which are fairly useful as predic-
tors, they reported at the Ameri-
can Meteorological Society's an-
nual meeting here last month.
Professors Edward Epstein and

_____________n I

DIAL
NO 8-6416

i
j.
mal p

SHOWS AT
1, 3, 5, 7,9 P.M.

A. Nelson Dingle of the engineer-
ing college, and James Harrington,
also of the engineering college,]
say that the predictions may help
hay fever sufferers to plan vaca-E
tions for escape.4
To Enable Predictions
Although hay fever victims,
some 15 per cent of the popula-
tion, are now able to tell fairly
accurately how bad a season will1
be, their means for predicting
other factors, such as the worst
day of the season, haven't yet
been perfected, they claim. E
"Our main drawback for this
and for further refinement of
prediction is the lack of good
data," they note. "As prediction
of the peak date has been poor,
it is better to assume that it
will occur at the end of August."
This date, although usually the
peak of the hay fever season,
could vary by a week either way,
the meteorologists contend.-
Ragweed Phenology
In making their predictions, the
three men used the phenology of
ragweed, one of the most powerful
producers of hay fever. (Phen-
ology is the science of relations
between climate and periodic bio-
logical events, e.g., how weather
affects the annual growth of rag-
weed.)
Their examination showed that
temperature, rainfall and soil
moisture are the key determinants
in ragweed production of pollen,
they report.
A warm rainy May and a rela-
tively dry July tend to increase
the concentration of pollen, the
meteorologists say.

Leaves of absence were granted
to Prof. Leslie R. Bassett of the
music school, Prof. Lloyd.E. Brow-
nell of the engineering school,
Prof. Charles M. Davis, chair-
man of the geography depart-
ment, Prof. Waldo E. Sweet of
the Romance Languages depart-
ment, Rep. Gilbert E. Bursley (R-
Ann Arbor), assistant director of
the Development Council and Mrs.
Lidie M. Howes, assistant editor
of the Middle English Dictionary.
Sick leave was given to Prof.
William R. Dawson of the zoo-
logy department, Prof. Maynard
Klein, director of the University
Choirs and Louis A. Schwartz of
the psychiatry department.
Sabbatical Leaves
Sabbatical leave was granted to
Prof. Donald T. Greenwood of the
engineering school.
The Regents also approved sab-
batical leaves to the following
members of the Flint college fac-
ulty: Prof. Joseph D. Firebaugh
of the English department; Prof.
Robert H. Cojeen of the business
administration department; Prof.
William R. Murchie of the zoo-
logy department; Prof. Glen R.
Rasmussen of the education de-
partment; Prof. Dorthea E. Wyatt
of the history department; Prof.
C. Paul Bradley of the political
science department; Prof. Robert
G. Schafer of the history depart-
ment.
Resignations were accepted from
Prof. Frances Greer of the music
school, resignation effective Feb.
3, 1962, and from Prof. H. Wiley
Hitchcock of the music school,
effective June 16, 1962.
DIAL NO 8-6416
'DELIGHTFUL!'
-4Post
HE'S UTTERLY
USTINOV
AND DELIGHTFULLY
DROLL
IN HIS MOST
UNIQUE AND
BITING ROLE
PETER
USTI NOV
IN
The Man Who
Wagged His Tail

a

'I.

presents;
iUfCA'J

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