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May 26, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PA

'd Chinese Officials

et To Stop

Refugees'

fights into Hong Kong

HIT WAR DOCTRINE:
U.S., Russia Adopt
Propaganda Pact
GENEVA M)--The Soviet Union joined the United States yes-
terday in a proposal against war propaganda which condemns the
doctrine that war is inevitable.
The draft proposal was the first significant East-West agreement
reached at the 10-week World Disarmament Conference.
It was submitted to the conference Jointly by United States Am-
bassador Arthur H. Dean and Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister Valer-
ian A. Zorin..
Express Approval
All 17 delegations expressed their approval. Adoption of the
draft by a plenary session of the conference-probably next week-is,

itish Cite
emigration
ow Drop

Declare Situation
Returned to 'Normal'
HONG KONG (A) - The mass
flight of refugees across the Chi-
nese Communist border into Hong
Kong was abruptly choked off yes-
erday, after three weeks.
Communist Chinese authorities
apparently had taken positive ac-
ign to stem the tide that had
oerwhelmed British facilities in
:he colony and created a many-
sided international problem.
British ' authorities announced
hat "the flow of illegal immi-
grants across the colony's land
:rontier has markedly diminished.
The situation on the border is now
rapidly reverting to normal."
No Indication /
'There was no immediate indi-
cation 'what Communist authori-
ies on the other side of the bor-
der had done to halt an exodus
which had poured 60,000 refugees
nto Hong Kong since May 1. But
here was speculation that Com-
nunist guards were using force in
he hills beyond the border.
Communist loudspeakers were
ilent after a full day of broad-
asting exhortations to would-be
efugees to return to their villages
o help grow food.
Hong Kong officials declined to
dlscuss how they could be certain
he exodus was ended.
British Ask Action
Earlier this week, the British
formally asked the Peiping gov-
rnment to take action to halt the
nass flight which had embarrass-
d the London government. Brit-
ish authorities had strung barbed
wire barriers along the -border,
voking comparisons with the wall
rected in' Berlin by the Commu-
nists to keep refugees from flee-
ng to the West.
The British said Hong Kong, al-
'eady overcrowded, just could not
handle any more refugees. Fear of
ncreased food shortages was cited
>y the Chinese refugees as a ma-
or reason for the exodus."
With the flow now dwindled tol
trickle, the British announced
hey had withdrawn army units
rom patrol duty. They also said
hey closed the detention camp
n which the refugees had been
ield until they could be shipped
>ack across the border.

CHINA Lungkgngs
CANTON P'ingsbonhsu
Hsihsiang
PAOAN Towe ong
PKOWLOON L
r VICTORIA '
HONG KONG
AISLANDt
%mn ...winm....-. - ----- .--- U
HONG ,KONG
CROWNCOLONY ,e0 5 0ies
REFUGE-The Chinese Communists closed the escape routes to
Hong Kong, the refuge from Red China's hunger and authoritar-
ian regime. The small'colony on the Chinese border has been
overcrowded with refugees and the British gvernment has forced
a number of-them to return to Communist China.
Border Incidents Show
Peiping Policy Blunders

Rusk Urges
International
Space Effort
SEATIE(P} )-rSecretary of
State Dean Rusk urged yesterday
that space activities be brought
under international regulation at
once, to insure that the 'space
race' will not become a military
arena.
Rusk took a "somber look at
what could happen" in- a speech
prepared' for a Seattle World's
Fair audience the day after Unit-
ed States Astronaut Malcolm Scott
Carpenter's successful orbiting of
the earth.
Possibilities Cited
Without international space su-
pervision and peaceful coopera-
tion, which the United States has
proposed, and which has yet to
win Communist acceptance, Rusk
said:
"The frontiers of space might
be pierced by huge nuclear-pro-
pelled dreadnaughts, armed with.
thermonuclear weapons.

a mere formality. It is almost cer-
tain to be approved by the United
Nations General Assembly later
this year.
The declaration solemnly con-
demned "appeals for war and for
the settlement of disputes between
states by the use of force, and al-
so statements to the effect that
war is necessary or inevitable."
But it did not require signatory
states to make war propaganda
a criminal offense, as Zorin had
proposed.
Modify Draft
Zorin's initial draft, suggested
as a side measure to create a fav-
orable atmosphere for a world dis-
armament treaty, was substantial-
ly modified in several weeks of
private talks between the United
States and Soviet delegates, co-
chairmen of the conference.
Dean objected that the United
States government had no power
to impose penal limitations on the
freedom of speech and freedom of
the press.
He insisted that free access to
information for all people was the
best antidote to war propaganda.
The agreed draft was a compro-
mise.
Zorin's willingness to join the
West in formally condemning the
doctrine of inevitable war looked
like a new Moscow ;slap at the
Chinese Communists.
The Chinese Reds are not rep-
resented at the Disarmament Con-
ference and have made little effort
to conceal their irritation at being
excluded.
Senate Approves
Farm Control Bill
WASHINGTON (M-The Senate
passed yesterday a complex and
controversial farm bill carrying
many .of the stiff production con-
trols and penalties asked by Pres-
ident John F. Kennedy. Passage
came after a week of sharp debate.

.

NIKITA S. KHRUSHCHEV
...-war in Laos

By ROY ESSOYAN
Associated Press News Analyst
WASHINGTON -- The-Chinese
Communists appear to have blund-
ered badly in permitting thou-
sands of refugees{ to flee food-
short Communist China.
That seems to be the only rea-
sonable explanation for the har-
rowing scenes enacted the last
three weeks on Communist China's
borders with Hong Kong-scenes
that could have added up to a'
major propaganda blow to the
Peiping regime.
60,000 Refugees Flee
An estimated 60,000 fugitives
from Communist China sought
asylum in overcrowded Hong Kong
during the last three weeks. This
is about 20 times the "normal"
flow, legal and illegal, across the
border.
When the norgnal trickle across
the border swelled into a flood
practically overnight the British
were forced to start turning them
back. There were no facilities to
handle such a deluge:
Only Recent Effort
The Chinese Communists made
no apparent effort to stop the

INVESTIGATING GROUP:
Charge Police Brutality
In 'Civil Rights' Cases
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-A committee headed by Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt
heard a group of Negroes relate yesterday accounts of harassment and
brutality, arrests under little-used statutes and solitary confinement
when they sought to promote civil rights in Louisiana and Mississippi.
It plans a further session today, and the" Congress of Racial
Equality (CORE), which has helped its staff in the, past said in a
statement that the reports to be received in the two days will indicate
"an attempt to intimidate the civ- ,"

mass exodus until a day or two
ago. Western observers tendered
several possible explanations for
this about-face in basic Commu-
nist tactics.
One, that the Communists were
only too happy to have that many
fewer mouths to feed. Another is
that they were trying to embar-
rass the British authorities in
Hong Kong.
None of these explanations,
however, took into account the
major loss of face the Peiping re-
gime was suffering,

Says USSR
Will Attempt
To Stave War
MOSCOW OP)-Premier Nikita
S. Khrushchev told a nationwide
radio and television audience yes-
terday the Soviet governmentt
"will strive to prevent a military
conflagration in Laos."'
He declared the United States
decision to land American troops
in Thailand had "seriously hinder-
ed" a settlement, but he made no
belligerent threats as a result of
President John F. Kennedy's ac-
tion.
Pledges Support
Khrushchev, addressing h is
countrymen after a trip to Bul-
garia, pledged to keep his prom-
ise to support efforts to establish
a neutral coalition government in
Laos.
At the same time, however, he
denounced pro-Western Premier
Prince Boun Oum for allegedly
frustrating the plan.
Cites Nam Tha
The Soviet Premier called the
Red military successes at Nam Tha
"a reply to the provocation of the
reactionaries," who were aided and
abetted by the United States, he
said.
Ri

"The moon might be turned
into a military base, and ways
might be found to cascade radio-
active waves upon an enemy.
Weather Control
"It is also possible that weather
control might become a military
weapon," Rusk asserted.
He said man can put outer space
to uses which might imperil civili-
zation and even life on earth - or
he can use it to benefit the human
race.
"The right time to subject acti-
vities in space to international law
and supervision is now, before
possibly untoward developments
occur," he said.
The Secretary of State recalled
that when the United States first
developed the atomic weapon, late
in World War IT, it followed up
with a plan for international con-
trol.
Orders Georgia
Reapportionment
ATLANTA (M -- Reapportion-
ment of at least one house of the
Georgia Legisiature on a popula-
tion basis before January, 1963,
was ordered yesterday by a three-
justice Federal court.

THE NEXT TIME YOU NEED
MEDICINE
Remember..

il rights movement ... and to de-
ter the liberal-minded public in
these cities from supporting civil
rights."
Two of those heard yesterday
were Ronnie Moore, a Southern
University sophomore and chair-
man of the Baton Rouge CORE,
and Weldon Rougeau, of Lake
Charles, La., also a sophomore at
the university and vice-chairman
of the Baton Rouge CORE group.
They said 23 students were ar-
rested after a minute and a half
of picketing downtown stores with
"don't buy" leaflets in an effort
'to end lunch counter -and employ-
ment discrimination..
Moore and Rougeau said they
were put under a variety of charg-
es and were placed together in an
isolated cell seven feet square
where they remained for 57 days
until bond was raised.
Moore said he is due to stand
trial Monday on a charge of "crim-
inal anarchy," under a statute he
said has never before been used
since it was put on the books in
1934.
Moore said he was slapped and
choked in the jail and that al-
though the FBI sent in agents to
investigate they reported they
found no violation of civil rights

Protests Quiz
About Sok
WASHINGTON (P)-The presi-
dent of the New York Stock Ex-
change portested vigorously yes-
terday against being quizzed pub-
licly about an inquiry the exchange
is conducting into promotion of a
stock that skyrocketed up and
down.
The Exchange head, G. Keith
Funston, said this "may result in
trial by press" and prejudice the
investigation.
Testifying as the final witness
at a Securities and Exchange Com-
mission public hearing into the
training and techniques of securi-
ties selling, Funston said "we
don't think this is a proper case
to come before a hearing of this
sort."
Funston amiably answered ques-
tions about the inquiry until he
was asked how many New York
Stock Exchange, brokerage firms
are involved. Twice he balked,
saying "I don't believe this is the
time to spread this on the open
record."

SUMMER STORAGE

including
free lubrication

The
VILLAGE APOTHECARY
OPEN 9 A.M.'til 11 P.M.
1112 S. University Ave. - Phone NO 3-5533

World News Roundup
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-A nuclear test in the Pacific Ocean and another
at the Nevada testing ground were exploded yesterday, the Atomic
Energy Commission announced. Both were of low yield, having the
blast equivalent of less than 20,000 tons of TNT.
* * * 4.
WASHINGTON--A trio of Soviet ships, rigged with elaborate
recording equipment, is on station at the edge of the United States
nuclear test area in the Pacific,
the Defense Department reported
yesterday.j

Beaver's Bike Shop
605 Church
We will cuddle your bikes

Delivery Service - Charge Accounts

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TWENTIETH CENTURY
RECREATION

BOWLING

COCKTAIL LOUNGE

MUSIC

Mon., Wed., Fri. and Sat. Evenings

214 W. Huron

NO 8-7470

ALGIERS-French riot troops
sealed off the Algiers airport yes-
terday to control a rush of thou-
sands of Europeans fleeing current
terrorism and the chaos they fear
will come with independence.
PARIS-Thp Supreme Court or-
dered yesterday a stay of execu-
tion for ex-Gen. Edmond Jouhaud
until it reviews his conviction as a
traitor. Presumably, the appeal
was made on the basis of the fact
that the Military Court had spared
ex-Gen. Raoul Salan's life.
BONN-Communist East Ger-
many is trying to obtain credit
from West Germany for addition-
al deliveries of steel, coal, machin-
ery, food and drugs, the West Ger-
man economics ministry said yes-
terday.
BANGKOK - The military
buildup launched by the United
States in Thailand turned 'into an
allied effort yesterday with the ar-
rival of armed forces units from
Britain and New Zealand.
* * *
NEW YORK-Torrents of sell-
ing battered the Stock Market,
causing the worst loss in more
than three years. An estimated
$7.4 billion was sliced from the
quoted value of stocks listed on the
New York Stuck Exchange.

a.' il plarnd trip

ou1d land

YOU

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w~s r- -.

ASIAWAY MULTI-PLY
For Regular Play
Approx. Stringing Cost
Tennis...........$S
Badminton ......$4

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4047
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning Prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month.)
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer.
TUESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury Hbuse
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion followed by
lunch at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 P.M. Daily Evening Prayer..
THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061
Church School 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 1 1:00 A.M.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor

!l

I

aI3AB BAT

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Toppon Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
7:30 p.m. Open House, 802 Monroe.
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenow Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. .Wednesday Services.
9:30ao.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.);
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Reading Room hours are Monday
thru Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5 p.m. except
Sundays and Holidays. Monday evening
7:00 to 9:00.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Washtenow at Forest
The Reverend Leonard Verduin, Pastor
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan
10:00 A.M. Worship Services
11:15 A.M. Coffee Hour
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
1420 Hill Street
Herbert Nichols, Clerk
Anthony and June Bing, House Directors
NO 2-9890
SUNDAY MORNING
10:00 A.M. Sunday School, Adult Discussion,
Worship, Fellowship.
11:00 A.M. Meeting for Worship.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION,
State and Huron Streets, Tel. 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert Minister
Rev. Eugene A. Ransom, Campus Minister?
Rev. Jean Robe, Associate Campus Minister
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. - Morning Worship,
"The Call to Discipleship,", Dr. Rupert
preaching.
Cars leaving the Foundation at 3 and 5 p.m.
for a picnic.
FRIDAY
5:45 p.m., Wesley Grads, dinner in Pine Room
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Aven~ue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Thomas Park, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Services, with ser-
mon by the pastor, "Constancy in Prayer"
(Holy Communion in both services)
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Study Groups
Sunday at 2:30 and 5:00: Groups leave for
Gamma Delta Outing.
Thursday at 730: Ascension Day Vespers, "A
Whole Panel of Witnesses"
(The Ascension Day Service will include
Holy Communion)
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.
For Transportation doll NO 2-2756.
i SiiLJFEC A U c~inEewrT rEkITFR

"i' s. Y.

1

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