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May 25, 1962 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-25

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AY 25, 1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

AY 25, 1962 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

U.S. Set To Admit
Chinese Refugees
From Hong Kong
WASHINGTON (P)-United States officials tackled a vast amount
of paper work yesterday to determine who among several thousand
Chinese refugees in Hong Kong will be admitted to the United States.
Rep. Francis E. Walter (D-Pa) yesterday submitted legislation
designed to bring an estimated 6,000 Chinese refugees from Hong
Kong into the United States.'
The proposal was described as one agreed on by the Administra-
tion and congressional immigration chiefs to implement President
< John F Kennedy's plan to ease

Indonesians
Reject Call
ByU Thant
JAKARTA (P)-Foreign Minis-
ter Subandrio said yesterday Unit-
ed Nations acting Secretary-Gen-
eral U Thant's appeal for resump-
tion of negotiations onWest New
Guinea should be directed to the
Dutch.
Meanwhile, a highcranking mili-
tary officer said he was elated at
the success of paratroop guerrillas
dropped in Western New Guinea's
lush jungles and declared "this is
just the beginning of a bigger
push."
Thant, attempting to avert a
full-scale war for the jungle ter-
ritory, Wednesday urged Presi-
dent Sukarno and Dutch Premier

SENATE BATTLE:

II

President Wins Farm Tests
WASHINGTON (P)--Advocates of stiffer government controls
over what the farmer plants and sells won two major tests in the
Senate yesterday.
In successive victories for the Kennedy Administration, the Sen-
ate wrote into a pending general farm bill two amendments calling
for strict limits on planting and marketing of wheat and of corn and
other livestock feed grains.
Both actions reversed 9-8 votes by the Senate Agriculture Com-
mittee against the Administration's recommendations, with Chairmanz

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Reds Attem t
To Stop Flow
HONG KONG (A)-Thousands
of refugees from Red China again
tried to slip by British border
guards and barbed wire barriers
into Hong Kong yesterday despite
growing efforts of Communist au-
thorities to dissuade them.
, Communist loudspeakers ap-
pealed to the fugitives to return
to their villages and help grow
food. But, border reporters said
Red guards made no attempt to
use force to stem the refugee flow,
which has become an international'
political and humanitarian prob-
lem.
Round-Up Most
Border sources said British po-
lice and army patrols rounded up
all but about 500 of 5,000 refugees
who succeeded in getting into this
crown colony before dawn. They
were sent to a detention camp for
return to Red China.
Later, a Hong Kong official said
the refugee flow was smaller be-
tween sundown and midnight
Thursday night than it has been
recently.
The official said it was not de-
termined whether Chinese Com-
munist guards were going beyond
nonforcible attempts to turn the
refugees around.
Reimpose Controls
In London, the Foreign Office
said the Chinese Communists were
remposing border controls Ii the
area by bringing in more frontier
guards and clearing the region of
refugees sent back by the train-
load.
Earlier this week, the British
formally asked the Peiping gov-
ernment to act in the difficult sit-
uation, which is fraught with em-
barrassment for the London gov-
ernment.

the refugee pressure on Hong
Kong. Secretary of State Dean
Rusk said he supports the plan.
It probably will take a couple of
days to figure out who will, be
allowed in, officials said. W. L.
Harden, an assistant United States
immigration commissioner, is on
his way to Hong Kong to super-
vise the operation.
Those allowed in under Kenne-
dy's special order will be drawn
from perhaps 5,000 in Hong Kong
who had already been cleared for
entry btit have remained on long
waiting lists, officials said. Only
105 Chinese a year are allowed into
America under the regular United
States immigration quota.
Chinese to be given the first
preference are those with special
skills who have sponsors in this
country or who have relatives in
the United States.
Kennedy invoked emergency
powers Wednesday to admit "sev-
eral thousand refugees" beyond
the normal quota. He did so on
humanitarian grounds because of
the surge of hungry escapees from
Red China into already overcrowd-
ed neighboring Hong Kong.
Similar action was taken to
bring in Hungarian refugees in
1956-57
Whether the United States will
also step up its food aid to Hong
Kong, now totaling more than $5
million a year, or will assist with
transportation in resettlement
projects apparently remains for
future decision.
Postpone Flight
Of Rocket Plane
EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE,
Calif.. (A') - An X-15 flight was
postponed yesterday because its
radar tracking system might have
interfered with equipment track-
ing astronaut Malcolm Scott Car-
penter.

House Sets
Aid Ceiling
WASHINGTON (P-The House
Foreign Affairs Committee voted
yesterday to fix a $4.6 billion ceil-
ing on the foreign aid program for
the coming year.
The figure represents a cut of
$210 million from the amount
President John F. Kennedy asked.
It is $6.5 million more than was
approved by the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee in acting on
a companion authorization bill
earlier this week.
Chairman Thomas E. Morgan
(D-Pa) listed the major reduc-
tions as $35 million for economic
development grants, $41.5 million
for support of allies' military
forces and $125 million from the
President's emergency contingent
fund.
Morgan said committee action
was complete except for the draft-
ing of a "good strong" amendment
aimed at countries receiving Unit-
ed States aid which seize private
American investments.
The chairman also told report-
ers he expects an attempt will be
made on the House floor to effect
an even deeper slash in the Presi-
dent's contingency fund.
The Senate committee version
contained the same reduction for
development grants, an $81.5 mil-
lion cut in support assistance -
or $40 million above the House
reduction - and $100 million be-
low the contingency fund request.
Morgan said his committee's ver-
sion contains no limitation on aid
to India.

Allen J. Ellender (D-La) leading
the floor battle for the Adminis-
tration.
First Vote
The first test produced a 53-36
margin for knocking out a com-
mittee proposal to continue the
current Federal wheat program.
Instead only a new allotment and
certificate program would be of-
fered wheat growers.
The second vote was 46 to 37,
substituted a rigid allotment and
marketing system for corn, grain
sorghums and most barley, the
chief livestock feed grains.
In both tests the heavy Demo-
cratic majority in the Senate pro-
vided the necessary votes. Repub-
licans, joined by a few Democrats,
lost in both tests.
Two-Thirds Vote
Both the wheat and feed grains
programs would have to be adopt-
ed by votes of two-thirds of the
growers in referenda to become
effective.
On wheat, the Senate struck out
a provision of the committee's bill
authorizing growers to vote for a
two-year extension of the tempor-
ary program now in effect. This
calls for a 10 per cent acreage
reduction.
The approved amendment, back-
ed by President John F. Kennedy
and Secretary of Agriculture Or-
ville L. Freeman, calls for a per-
manent, tight wheat marketing
quota program expected to result
in a 20 per cent acreage cut.
Similarly, the feed grains provi-
sion written into the bill calls for
a permanent marketing quota pro-
gram covering corn, barley and
sorghums. A minimum national
quota of 110 million tons would be
fixed for these grains-slightly be-
low last year's yield.

SEN. ALLEN J. ELLENDER
.. leads victories

7

I

U THANT
... appeal answered

Jan E. De Quay to return to the
conference table on the basis of
the proposals of retired United
States diplomat Ellsworth Bunker.
The proposals are reported to
call for United Nations supervision
of the territory for two years while
the Indonesians gradually take
over administration
The Indonesians and the Dutch
have accepted the proposals in
principle. But Sukarno has ob-
jected to the two-year provision-
it would disrupt his timetable to
get New Guinea this year.
Subandrio told newsmen he
welcomed Thant's efforts to get
negotiations back on the track, but
he ruled out resuming talks until
the Dutch "accept the Bunker pro-
posal as Indonesia has done."
The Dutch have estimated about
400 Indonesian paratroopers, de-
scribed here as volunteers and not
regulars, have been dropped in sev-
eral parts of Western New Guinea
in the last few weeks.
Republicans Quit
Lobbying Session
LANSING (,P)-One Republican
senator walked out on the attorney
general and some others were irate
yesterday at being called to tes-
tify in a probe of lobby activities
in the Senate. The five Republi-
cans had insisted newsmen be al-
lowed in the attorney general's of-
fice to report their remarks.

U 1

Sorld News Roundup
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-President John F. Kennedy met for an hour
yesterday with Secretary of State Dean Rusk and key advisers on
Far Eastern problems. The White House described it as strictly a rou-
tine session.
CHICO, Calif.-A smoke-billowing explosion destroyed a Titan
missel and wrecked its launching silo yesterday during a fueling test
at the newly constructed Chico missile complex.
NEW ORLEANS-Archbishop Joseph Francis Rummel yesterday
turned over the administration of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of
New Orleans to Co-adjutor Archbishop John Patrick Cody. It was
Rummel who ordered the desegregation of Catholic schools in the
archdiocese.
LOS ANGELES-The United States has nothing to fear from
trade competition with other countries, David J. McDonald, United
Steelworkers president, said yesterday.

I I

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