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May 17, 1962 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-17

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t

FACE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 17, 1982

r4

Visits League

NSA REFERENDUM:
Young Conservatives

SInvade' Oklahoma

(Continued from Page 1)
had not warned them with a
"beeper" tone, he had acted il-
legally.
They reported the episode to the
district attorney in Oklahoma City
and the Federal Bureau of Investi-
gation. They said they had not
heard since from the YAF officers.
For two weeks before this, Stan-
ley and Cotter had addressed Ro-
tary Clubs and parent groups in
Tulsa, Oklahoma City, Muskogee
and other communities, some ex-
tremely right-wing.
Majority Opinion
According to reports, they in-
sinuated not only that the NSA
did not represent the majority of
student opinion in the country,
but also that it was a Communist
front, subversive group.
As a result a number of parents
called or wrote students and the
university administration to pro-
test against the NSA.
On the day of the referendum,

according to the student senate
president and others who were ob-
servers at the polls, "the pledges
were marching down in blocs say-
ing 'NSA is the organization that's
communitic, isn't it?'"
Students who attempted to find
the reasons for this attitude were
usually told:
"Well, everybody said it was
communitsic. You can't vote 'yes'
for NSA."
The vote was the largest cast in
the history of the unversity.
NSA Loses
The NSA lost, 3 to 1.
This is one university and the
case is etxreme. But around the
country, many moderate and
young conservatives are troubled
about YAF tactics.
The strongest criticisms come
from conservatives who have seen
the group operate locally, or mid-
dle-roaders and liberals who have
witnessed YAF actions at student
conventions.

IN THE GARDEN-Actor George Montgomery, currently appear-
ing in the Drama Season production of "Toys in the Attic,"
admires a statue in the League's newly-opened Garden Cafe.
Montgomery's production will continue through Saturday at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.

ARTS AND LETTERS:
Hines Notes Need for Operas in English.

Many of the 1,000 students who
attended the NSA congress at
Madison, Wis., last year were dis-
mayed by YAF members.
"They didn't convince, they
alienated," said Nancy Walrath, a
moderate who was editor this year
of The Oklahoma Daily. "They'd
jump , p and make inflammatory
speeches. You could feel the whole
congress move to the left."
Left-Wing Tactics
Adult observers suggested the
techniques of YAF resemble the
left-wing student tactics of the
Thirties.
Conservative students at last
year's congress called the YAF'ers
"noisy," '"disruptive," and "un-
derhanded." They said some "be-
lieved the end justified the means"
and mentioned a front group that
the YAF had set up at the con-
gress.
This was the Committee for a
Responsible National Students Or-
thousands of mimeographed sheets
ganization. Letterheads on the
turned out by the committee bore
th YAF national address.
On some campuses a single
YAP personality has become the
center of controversy. Such is the
case at Harvard. Howard Phillips,
New England director of the group,
was president of the small inef-
fective Student Council last year.
According to students and mem-
bers of the administration, Phil-
lips used his office to tell the
world that Harvard had "gone
conservative" by electing a mem-
ber of YAF as president of the
student body.
Spurred Campaign
"The students' wrath was so
great that, in a referendum last
fall, they abolished the group
he represented and the office he
held," said Frederic Ballard Jr., a
liberal who is editor of The Har-
vard Crimson. That newspaper
spurred the campaign against
Phillips. -
Elsewhere, criticism has come
from within Jim Dannenbaum, a
Littlewood Plans
'Mathematics Talky

gentle boy who heads the group
at the University of Texas said he
wants:i to ask its national chair-
man at Yale:
"Send us more speakers, more
materials, rather than arouse.
Give us less noise. Very little good
ever comes from rallies or rabble-
rousing on the left, right, or
middle."
Conservative Journal
Insight and Outlook, the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin's conserva-
tive journal, criticized YAP re-
cently as "mimeocracy-bureau-
cracy byr mimeograph." It said:
Picketing may be fun, marching
may be fun, torchlight rallies may
be fun, but if the battle is one of
ideas, what is the idea of all this?"
The journal maintained:
"Those colleges where there are
active conservative groups have
not, by and large, gained -them
from YAF. The conservatives have
gathered around separate and lo-
cal traditions, separate and local
colleges.
"What the YAF promises, is the
adoption of the liberal methods of
the Thirties and before to destroy
what those methods brought
about."
Voice To Hear
Peace Plans
Prof. Seymour Melman of Co-
lumbia University will speak at
the . third Voice Political Party
Symposium on the Arms Race at
7:30 p.m. today in the Multi-
purpose Room of the UGLI. His
talk will be about his plan for
United States initiatives for peace
in the cold war.,
Prof. Melman is from the in-
dustrial engineering department at
Columbia and has worked with
the Institute of War and Peace
Studies.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

R-71

Leadership
Experience

Qx Hard Working
Fx -Yakisikli

A4

momollliin

VOTE
FAZIL.
A. AYDINMAKINE
for ISA President

fop
Y oui'en

J

By MARJORIE BRAHMS
"When I sing well, it is God
singing, and when I am singing
poorly, it is because I am suppres-
sing Him," Jerome Hines, baritone
with the Metropolitan Opera and

soloist at the recent May Festival,
said.
Hines, who sang excerpts from
Moussorsky's opera "Boris God-
unov," is presently revising an
opera of his own. The opera, now
performed as a unit, but actually

The Arab Club Presents
THE PALESTINE QUESTION

FRIDAY, May

18,

1962

Multipurpose Room.
UGLI

three operas, is called "The Life
of Christ."
It depicts the three sections of
His life: "I am the Way," from
the baptism to the Sermon onrthe
Mount, "I am the Truth," from
the Sermon to the ressurection of
Lazarus, and "I am the Life,"
from Palm Sunday through the
ressurection of Christ.
Simple Structure
The opera requires a company
of 60 to 80 people and accompani-
ment of seven instruments. Be-
cause of its simple structure, the
opera is easy to rewrite and per-
fect, Hines noted.
Among its 38 performances seen
by 5000 people, "The Life of
Christ" has been to Atlanta, Ga.
"They integrated the balcony
there so more people could see it,"
Hines said.
Discussing what makes an ar-
tistic genius, Hines said that
"much latent genuis has been
brought into being through nero-
ticism, being close to insanity
and out of step with humanity."
Musical Genius
The great musical genius of our
time in America is yet to come,
Hinesasaid. He explained the di-
lemma by citing the mediocrity of
all things in America and the
idea Americans have of conform-
ing.
Hines sees the direction of
American music to be towards
singing operas in English. "If this
is not done, opera will continue to
be a white elephant. It should not,
be a mystery nor an inner sanc-
tumn," he said.
There should be a standard
translation for all opera com-
panies, Hines noted. He suggested
the United States begin an In-

ternational opera showcase which
would performoperas in the ori-
ginal language while the rest of
the country would use translated
versions.
West Germany
Hines cited West Germany as
a country in which opera flour-
ishes. They operate eleven months
a year with 65 companies. This is
possible because they perform in
their own language.
However, West Germany still
needs subsidy, Hines commented.
He favors having subsidy in the
United States because "art is edu-
cational. The state pays for the
education of our children and
higher art forms should come
under the same category.
"Europe is much more prolific
than we are in the arts and their
art is mainly under subsidy," he
noted.
Search for Originality
Hines sees much modern music
as a "great search for originality,"
essentially purposeless except for
seeking originality.

ILEAG UE
IGARIDEN CAFIE
Refreshments available
FRESH FRUIT
POTATO CHIPS
COOKIES
CANDY

COKE MACHINE
ICE CREAM
*At the main desk
1.

::'

DIAL
5-6290

SHOWS AT
2:00 - 5:10- 8:30
s Np (Continuous)

Prof. J. E. Littlewood of Cam-
bridge University will speak on
mathematics at Cambridge from
1860-1960 at 4 p.m. today in Aud
C. The lecture is sponsored by the
mathematics department.

Baha'i Student
Baha'i Scriptures,
Lawrence.

Group, Discussion:
May 18, 8 p.m., 418

Cercie Francais, Don't miss the last
meeting of Baratin this afternoon, May
17, 3-5 p.m., 3050 FB. Soyez les bien-
venue. Refreshments.

Academy A ward Winner !

BEST ACTOR! STANLEY KRAMER'S
Maximlian Schel ,UDGMENT
BEST A'
SCREENPLAY! NUREMBERG

I
mol-

J

.

MATINEE
$1.00
Eves and
Sun.
$1.25

Exclusive Special Engagement I
NO RESERVED SEATS! 3 PERFORMANCES DAILY!

....

"

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mmmwm

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I

PAID ADVERTISEMENT
PRESENTS
TONIGHT and Friday at 7 and 9
Josef Von Sternberg's
THE BLUE ANGEL
Marlene Dietrich, Emil Jannings
Short: THE PAWNSHOP (Chaplin)
Saturday and Sunday
Robert Louis Stevenson's
THE BODY SNATCHER
Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi, Henry Daniell
PLUS: COMEDY PROGRAM-
Cuckoo Waltz, Pow Wow, Buster Keaton short

I

Meet,
InPerson
Warner Brothers Recording Artists

"ONE OF BERGMAN'S
MOST POWERFUL
FILMS!
Harriet Anderson
is spellbinding!"
-Life Magazine
ACADEMY AWARD
BEST FOREIGN FILM
OF THE YEAR

I

Tennessee w iltams, the autror oy uac on a tioot, t& o
Richard Brooks, the writer-director of "Elmer Gantry"
PETR ,Pandro S. Berman, the producer of "Butterfield 8"
Metro
Goldwyn PAUL NEWMAN
Mayer
GPrsents ERALDINE PAGE
and Based on thePlay 5
byTENNESSEE WILLIAMS
MARY
He
After their performancel
most
on the Diag use
mneys
at the r
0.. Irv WI

Few films have had such a4
stunning critical and popular
success as the original Blue
Angel. The story of a repressed
high school teacher who tries
to protect his pupils from the
enticeipents of a night-club
singer, only to fall a victim to
her flinty charms, became, in
Josef von Stenberg's director-
ial hands, an unforgettable
story of personal degradation.
Even in the less consequential
films he has directed, -von
Sternberg has always been
noted for his pictorial talent,
his ab ility to frame a film
image that meets demanding
esthetic standards. In The Blue
Angel, this talent is at its peak:
the brutality of stage and back-
stage life in routines catering to
the grossness of the lower
middle class is rendered with
the most refined .precision. It
is like a German ToUlouse-
Lautrec come to life. Emil Jan-
nings is characteristically pow-
erful as the middle-aged Pur-
itan whose rebellion against his
barren life leads to public
cuckoldry and humiliation.
Marlene Dietrich, singing her
sultry numbers seated back-
wards in a chair, is an in-
effaceable image of the sex-
machine, not at all wicked,
just as indifferent as a stone.
Those of the public who were
subjected to the awkward,
mawkish, and incredible re-
make of The Blue Angel two
-1-{~ib ® tari" n~nrc

edies: Cuckoo Waltz-a short
comis satire shown last year
(and of all our shorts the one
which has been most request-
ed); Pow Wow-a candid cam-
era expose of the comic foibles
of a university band preparing
its marching program for the
week-end game; and a Buster
Keaton short. This is one of
the very few Keaton shorts
available for public showing.
In the years before television
finally killed it, the Hollywood
"B" picture was a valuable
training ground for young cin-
ematic talents. Made on a low
budget, intended merely to fill
the bottom half of a double
featrre, the unheralded, un-
pretentious "B" picture often
revealed greater vitality, and
imagination than the major
productions to which it dcted as
a curtain raiser.
Of the Cirectors who served
their apprenticeships making
"B" pi~tures, one of the most
eminent is Robert Wise, winner
of thi's years Academy Award
for West Side Story. In the
middle forties Wise directed a
series of outstanding horror
films for Val Lewton, one of the
:1ost inventive of "B" picture
producers.
The Body Snatchers is one of
the most successful products of
the Lewton-Wise colaboration.
Based on ~ a story by Robert
Lots Stevenson, the film deals
with the relationship between
an upright nineteenth century
doctor (Henry Daniell) and the
"resurrectionist" or grave rob-
ber (Boris Karloff) on whom

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11

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