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May 16, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

)utch Move

To Repel

Indonesian Troopers
In South New Guinea
nN

THEY STAND PURSUED-The government is after Billie Sol
Estes (right) for alleged defrauding of the Agriculture Depart-
ment; but the Republicans are after Agriculture Secretary Orville
Freeman (left) for his actions in the Estes controversy.
ESTES INVESTIGATION:
Aide Dumped as GOP
Asks, Freeman Ouster
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Secretary of Agriculture Orville L. Freeman yes-
terday fired Assistant Secretary James T. Ralph in connection with
gift-giving by indicted Billie Sol Estes, indicted Texas financier-
Meanwhile congressional Republicans were demanding Freeman's
own resignation .over charges that his department had an. employe
committed to a mental institution because she "knew too much about
the Estes case.
Admits Contribution
And Sen. Ralph Yarborough (D-Tex) admitted that Estes had
contributed some $1,700 toward his expenses in taping programs

Aerial Attack
At Fak-Fak
Dispatch Naval Force
To Seal Off Coastline
By The Associated Press
HOLLANDIA-More than 100
Indonesian paratroopers w e r e
dropped on the southern coast of
New Guinea yesterday, and Dutch
forces were rushed to the scene to
repel them.
Rear Adm. Leenert Reeser, com-
mander of the Dutch Forces in
New Guinea, reported the landings
and his counter-action to the De-
fense Ministry in the Hague, where
the government made an an-
nouncement about the latest de-
velopment in the Dutch-Indones-
ian struggle over the future of
New Guinea.
"Indonesian paratroopers were
dropped in two attack waves in the
neighborhood of Fak-Fak," Rees-
er reported.,
A Defense Ministry spokesman
said at least four Dakotas (C-47's)
carrying about 20 paratroopers
each took part in the first of two
saves.
Besides infantry and marines,
naval units have been dispatch-
ed to close off the coastline should
the Indonesians want to withdraw
by boat, the spokesman said.
The Dutch have reported killing
two members of the first Indones-
ian contingent and capturing one.
In Jakarta, Indonesia's army
chief of staff, Gen. Abdul Haris
Nasution, declared yesterday that
armed Indonesian "volunteers"
have been dropped in several parts
of West New Guinea and that in-
filtration of the Dutch-held terri-
tory by Indonesian "youth" would
not be stopped.

Firm Policy
Demanded
By Kennedy
WASHINGTON (-) - President
John F. Kennedy was authorita-
tively reported yesterday to feel
the United States, having should-
ered the major burden of the cold
war, is entitled to pursue force-
fully honorable solutions to world
problems without serious disrup-
tion by differences among its al-
lies.
This includes speaking out vig-
orously in behalf of its own inter-
ests, too, high administration
sources said, and having its posi-
tion recognized diplomatically and
politically.
Reflection of Distress
His position, as outlined here,
seemed to be a reflection of dis-
tress and irritation over open dis-
putes within the western camp
over - approaches by the United
States as leader of =the non-Com-
munist world to solve highly ex-
plosive issues in many parts of
the globe.
If so, his views would be aimed
particularly at France and West
Germany, who have remained'
openly critical of talks with the
Soviet Union on the Berlin crisis.
They also would strike at the
government of Prince Boun Oum
in Laos, tottering under the -im-
pact of a Communist offensive
which the administration feels his
military strongman, Phoumi No-1
savan, helped precipitate. ,
Other Countries;
"We do not propose," a high
official said, "to be taken into ac-
tion which may involve the de-1
struction of the United States and
other countries" without exploring
all other alternatives.
At his news conference last weeks
the President spoke of West Ger-
many's public differences with the1
United States in the Berlin nego-#
tiations. He said the United States
had done more than any nation' to,
guarantee West Berlin's freedom
and would bear the brunt of any
Soviet attack.
"We have some rights to at least
explore" peaceful solutions under
such circumstances, he said.
The official who reported Ken-e
nedy's views yesterday pointed outI
that the United States had strong-I
ly reinforced its troops protectingc
West Europe during the Berlin s
crisis, but France had not.t

TENSE ELEMENTS:
De Gaulle Says France
To Stay 'Aloof' In Berlin
PARIS (A)--President Charles de Gaulle made it clear yesterday
France will stay aloof from United States-British contacts with the
Soviet Union over Berlin and disarmament.
The Big Four occupation statute on Berlin should remain in-
violate, he told 500 newsmen at his first news conference since last
September.
"We think that in today's international situation-whose ele-
ments are tension, threats and cold war--it is vain to seek to settle
the German problem in a satisfying way," he said. "That would be
like trying to square the circle."
Calling the current balance between East and West precarious, de
Gaulle said this is the time to try to change established facts. Soviet

ISRAELI INDEPENDENCE DAY
CELEBRATION ..
THURSDAY, MAY 17, 8 p.m., RACKHAM AMPHITHEATER
GREETINGS FROM THE UNIVERSITY AND INTERNATIONAL
CENTER
ADDRESS BY EPHRAIM DAVROTH, COUNSEL OF ISRAEL,
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
ISRAEL IN SONG: THE BLUESTEINS
MOVIE-"THE WILDERNESS, ZIN"
REFRESHMENTS

policy, he claimed, aims at getting<
the West to agree in the end to
starting a withdrawal.
"After that," he said, "the So-
viets will pass to the next stage
which would be easier than the
first,
He showed opposition to the
American proposal to put West
Berlin's access routes under an
international control commission,
saying:
"France is not ready to accept
measures which would place West-
ern forces (in West Berlin) under
any other controls than those
agreed upon by the victorious pow-
ers (in World War II)."
Salan Silent
As Trial Starts
PARIS (gp)-Raoul Salan, the
cold and colorless general who
turned to armed revolt against
France in his stubborn battle to
ward off Algerian independence,
sat. mute yesterday at the opening
of his treason trial. The head of
the dreaded Secret Army in Al-
giers looked on impassively 'from
the prisoner's dock as his attor-
neys consumed most of the day
attacking the competence and
makeup of the special high mili-
tary court that may condemn him
to die.

a

Establishes
Death Zone
In Viet Nam
BEN TUONG ()-Within the
next two weeks the South Viet
Nam government plans to create a
"death zone" 30 miles north of
Saigon in which anyone found will
be assumed to be a Communist
guerrilla and will be shot on sight.
The 40-square mile enclave is
within a region known as "D
Zone," a heavily forested area al-
most completely under the, con-
trol of the Viet Cong. It Is consid-
ered a haven for Red supply bases,
ammunition dumps, arms factories
and training centers.,
The government is warning peo-
ple to move out of the no man's
land by dropping thousands of
leaflets and by asking relatives of
the families living there to write
personal letters. Those who don't
move will be assumed to be Viet
Cong sympathizers.
Residents of "D Zone" are to be
moved into cleared areas in which
safe hamlets are being built.

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I

!I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

4'
I

Red Chinese
Refugees Pour,
TO Hong Ikong
HONG KONG M-)-Border area
sources said. yesterday more than
10,000 refugees -crossed the fron-'
tier of this -British crown colony
in the last four nights in futile
mass -attempts to escape hunger-
ridden Red China.
All but, a handful were round-
ed up by Hog Kong police and
British army troops and returned
to the Communist - dominated
mainland. British authorities re-
gard the colony as too crowded
now with Chinese refugees to let
them stay.
Informants on the frontier said
thousands were waiting in the
brush on the China side to make
their attempt under cover of dark-
ness.
Where border fences existed,
some groups have pushed them
flat and then marched across in-
to the hills. Other groups have up-
rooted or cut the 8-foot-high wov-
en wire fences

for broadcast over Texas ra-
dio stations.
Ralph, who has been undergoing
training for a post as agriculture
attache to the Philippines, is the
third department official either to'
be fired or to resign in connection'
with the Estes case.
Deputy Administrator j
The others were Emery E. Jac-
obs, deputy administrator of the
Agricultural Stablizition and Con-
servation Service, who resigned,
and William E. Morris, who was an
assistant to Ralph.
FBI Reports
In announcing the action against
Ralph, Freeman said in a state-
ment that he acted on the basis
of reports of the Federal Bureau
of Investigation, which investi-
gated Ralph's connection with the
case.
All three Agriculture Depart-
ment employes had been named in
testimony before a Texas court
of inquiry cgnducted by Texas
Atty. Gen. Will Wilson. The testi-
mony told of clothing gifts to the
officials. Wilson said. Estes court-
ed department favors in connec-
tion with grain storage and cot-
ton-production operations under
the department.

World News Roundup
By The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS-The Security Council will meet tomorrow
morning in another effort to settle the fourteen-year dispute between
India and Pakistan over Kashmir, despite India's objections.
.* * * .
ALGIERS-Secret Army killers launched a net' wave of terror
through this tortured city yesterday in bloody reprisals against Mos-
lems. Authorities said more than 50 persons were killed and 22
" wounded. Most of the victims were

'I

Spanish Police'
Seize Women
.Demonstrators
MADRID (W) -- Spanish police
darted into the crowded Puerta
del Sol Plaza yesterday and seized
about 50 women gathering to dem-
onstrate in support of the striking
workers of Spain.
In the strike-bound coal fields
of northern Spain a cabinet min-
ister announced the government's
intention to settle the work stop-
page there.
The women were whisked off to
the nearby security headquarters
before they could utter a single
shout of sympathy for the 70,000
workers defying the country's laws
against walkouts. The strikes are
the most serious labor trouble in
Gen. Francisco Franco's 23 years
of rule. But the government has
taken to drastic action in the cris-
is.
Word of the planned demon-
stration had circulated widely in
this capital and security police
were waiting when the women ar-
rived.

JERUSALEM, Israeli Sector-A
joint motion by four parties ex-
pressing non-confidence in the Is-
rael government was defeated in
Parliament yesterday. The motion,
rejected 54-47, was sponsored by
the right-wing Herut party, the
liberals, the leftwing Mapam party
and the Communists.
* * *
LONDON-The House of Lords
last night voted down, 41-21, a bill
by Laborite Lord Walston to out-
law discrimination on grounds of
race, color or religion. Many peers
said they approved the aims but
suggested such a law would not
work and that such, ideals would
not be attained by legislation.
* * *
NEW YORK-The Stock Mar-
ket posted its best one-day ad-
vance in more than four years.
yesterday, continuing the rally
that snapped a protracted decline
at mid-day yesterday. This was
based on the Associated Press aver-
age of 60 stocks, 'which spurted
4.00 to 241.50, a rise not equalled
since it jumped the same amount
Nov. 15, 1957.

Moslems, including four women,
four Europeans also died in the
blast of Secret Army guns.

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(Continued from Page 2)
didates will be administered on Wed.,
May 16, from 7 to 9 p.m. in Aud. C,
Angell Hall.
This will be the last administration
of the screening examinations for this
semester. Any person wishing to take
the written tests in French or German
must first pass the screening exam.
Events Thursday
Faculty Recital: Ava Case, Prof. of
Piano, School of Music, will present the
music of Johann Sebastian Bach in a
recital Thurs., May 17, 8:30 p.m., in
Aud. A, Angeli Hall, She will play Fan-
tasie in S minor, Fifteen Two-part In-
ventions, Chromatic Fantasie and Fu-
gue, and Partita No. 6.in E minor. Open
to the general public.
Physical Therapy Meeting: All stu-
dents planning to concentrate in Phys-
ical Therapy or interested in learning
more about Physical Therapy, Thurs.,
May ,17 at 7:15 p.m., 1603, first floor,
tniVersity Hospital Movie followed by
discussion and demonstrations in the
Physical Therapy Clinic.
Lecture: Dr. Edward T. Hall, Prof. of
Anthropology, Columbia University, will
speak on "Human Needs in Micro-Spa-
tial Settings" on Thurs., May 17 at 4
p.m, in the Architecture Aud.
Mathematics Lecture: Prof. J. E. Lit-
tlewood of Cambridge, England, will
speak on "Mathematics in Cambridge
from 1860-1960" Thurs., May 17, at 4:00
p.m. 'in Aud. C, Angell Hall.
Refreshments in 3212 Angell Hall at
3:30 p.m.
Doctoral Examihation for Philip Rich-
ard Pluta, Nuclear Engineering; thesis:
"An Analysis of Nuclear Reactor Fluc-
tuations by Methods of Stochastic Proc-
esses," Thurs., May 17, 315 (Conference
Room) Auto. Lab. Chairman, William
'err.
Doctoral Examination for Harold
John Vanderzwaag, Education; thesis:
'Delineation. of an Essentialistic Philos-
ophy of Physical Education," Thurs.,
May 17, 111 PEM Bldg., at 3:00 p.m.
Chairman, E. F. Zeigler.
Doctoral Examination for Stephen Al-
len Hunter, Education; thesis: "Erik-
sonian Correlates of Late-Adolescent
Male Ego Identity," Thurs., May 17, 3002

UHS, at 9:00 a.m. Chairman, E. C.
Roeber.
Doctoral Examination for Samuel Jo-
seph Marino, Library Science; thesis:
"The French-Refugee Newspapers and
Periodicals in the United States, 1789-
1825," Thurs., May 17. . Council Room,
Rackham Bldg., at 1:00 p.m. Chairman,
R. L. Kilgour.
Doctoral Examination for Rondeau
Garvin Laffitte, Jr~ Education & Psy-
chology: thesis: "Analysis of Increased
Rate of Reading of Col1ege Students,"
Thurs., May 17, 2532 U.E.S., at 8:00 a.m.
Chairman, W. A. Ketcham.
Doctoral Examination for Anthony
John Gregory, Instrumentation Engi-
neering; thesis: "Time Domain Method
of Design for a Class of Nonlinear
Systems," Thurs., May 17, 1300 E. Engin.
Bldg., at 3:00 p.m. Co-Chairmen, L. L.
Rauch and Wilfred Kaplan.
Doctoral Examination for Paul Ken-
neth Morse, Education & Psychology;
thesis: "The Strong Vocational Inter-
est Bland and Minnesota Multiphase
Personality Inventory as Measures of
Persistence Toward the Ministry as a
Vocational Goal," Thurs., May 17, 4023
ErRS,, at 10:00 a.m. Chairman, J. E. Mil-
holland.
Doctoral Examination for Arthur Cary
Markendorf, Education; thesis: "In-
creased Responsibility of the Public
Schools for Mentally Retarded Children
(1893-1959)," Thurs., May 17, 2532 Uni-
versity Elementary School, at 10:00 a.m.
Co-Chairmen, C. A. Egertsen and W.
A. Ketcham.
Doctoral Examination for Robert
Hamilton Twiss, Jr., Conservation; thes-
is: "An Approach to the Study of Nat-
ural Resources Policy: The Porcupine
Mountains Controversy," Thurs., May
17, 2032 Natural Resources Bldg., at 2:00
p.m. Chairman, L. E. Craine.
Doctoral Examination for Robert
Earl Vincent, Conservation: thesis: "Bio-
graphical and Ecological Factors Con-
tributing to the Decline of Arctic Gray-
ling, Thymallus arcticus Pallas, in
Michigan and Montana," Thurs., May
17, 1032 Natural Resources Bldg., at
8:00 a.m. Chairman, S. A. Cain.
Seminar on the Structure and Sim-
metry of Crystals: Prof. W. C. Kelly and
R. W. Vian will discuss "Structure and
(Continued on Page 4)

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