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May 15, 1962 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-15

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TUESDAY, MAY 15, 1962

'TU. M YRUZi.Efi1T ItXE.

TUESDAY, MAY 15, 1962 t3 U TAX nEiKUTaA 'iTE"ALLYX Ui

PAGE

NO OLYMPICS:
McRae Picks Gridiron Career

Five-Team Battle Shapes Up for Golf Title

T

By DAVE GOOD
Two summers from now in Tok-
yo, hurdlers representing every
part of the world will set them-
selves in their starting blocks,
anticipating the gunshot that wil
signal the start of the 110-meter
high hurdle finals of the 1964
Olympic Games.
But the best hurdler in the
world in 1964 will not win that
race. He won't even be in it. At
best, he will be watching from the
stands, a professional for a Na-
tional Football League team in the
United States.
* *-*
Bennie McRae is a wiry, 6', 175-
lb senior from Newport News, Va.,
who made his last appearance as
a Michigan football halfback last
November when he separated a
shoulder and had to leave the
Iowa game.
Yet McRae, small even as col-
lege gridders go, has decided to
accept a bid from the Chicago
Bears of the NFL to play pro ball
next year. It was a decision which
McRae made after much soul-
searching, for McRae is not the
best football players in the world.
But those who should know in-
sist that he is potentially the best
hurdler in the world.
Right now, however, McRae still
Fht
Sailing Club,
Fight Way'
g a
To Nationals
(Continued frorm Page 1)
A total of nine schools partici-
pated. They were Wayne State
University, Wisconsin, Marquette,
Wooster and Ohio Wesleyan.
Michigan qualified for the Mid-
west Championship several weeks
ago in area competition by defeat-
ing State and Wayne.
The regatta was hosted by Ohio
State University at Leatherlips
Yacht Club..
Newport Harbor
The nationals will be held at
Newport Harbor, near Los An-
geles, June 18-22. Sailing the Leh-
man Dinghies and Lido 14's for
Michigan will be Miss Schneider,
Goldsmith, Rabe, White, Lee Jef-
feries, Mike Carr and Travis Ran-
dolph.
Eight schools annually compete
for the national honors-two from
the west, midwest, New England
and middle Atlantic. Last year
Michigan placed fourth..
The Michigan Sailing Club sails
out at Baseline Lake where the
club owns nine Jet 14's and one
Tech Dinghy.

has to prove he is the best in the
Big Ten when he meets Wiscon-
sin's Larry Howard this Saturday
in the. conference outdoor meet.
Howard, McRae remembers only
too well, is the one who divested
him of his two indoor hurdle titles
last March.
Makes Impression
And this is a curious business--
this having to prove himself-be-
cause whenever McRae runs, he
never fails to impress. those who
see him.
Not the least of these is Hayes
Jones, the Olympic bronze medal-
ist and American indoor record-
holder from Pontiac and Eastern
Michigan, whom McRae has never
defeated in some half-dozen meet-
ings around the country.,
"Bennie's got the speed and the
strength to be the best hurdler
in the world." Jones marveled at-
ter watching McRae top Olympic
runner-up Willie May in a tri-
angular meet in Ann Arbor two
weeks ago.
"Why, he's stronger than I am,
although I don't think he's as fast.
I believe he could run a :13.2, any-
way (tieing the world record), and
he could certainly make the Olym-
pic team in two years," Jones
added.
Work Together
This is no small praise coming
from a man who is now superior to
McRae and in fact thinks of him
as his protege when they work
out together in the summer.
But there are others who are
even more enthusiastic. Don Can-
ham, McRae's coach at Michigan,
has been calling him the second-
best hurdler (to Jones) in the
country for the last two years.
Just last fall, after Canham had
seen his star finish fourth in both
the NCAA and AAU meet hurdles
(after being able to work out for
only two days before the NCAA
and not at all before the AAU),
Canham exclaimed, "I think he
can break the world record right
now and be the best in the U. S.
for the next ten years.
"Guys like Harrison Dillard,
Hayes Jones and Bennie come
along very seldom."
Friends in N.C.
But that's not the half of it.
There are, at Winston-Salem
Teachers College in N. C., one
track coach named Ross and one
pupil of his named Elias Gilbert,
himself a world record-breaker in
the low hurdles.
"They told me that if I really1
work hard and get in shape-
something I haven't been able to1
do in college yet- I can run a
:12.8 in the highs," McRae ex-
plained.
A :12.8 is a mark which is really
beyond comprehension, at this
time. Lee Calhoun and Germany's
Martin Lauer have both done :13.2
for the world record, Richard At-
tlesey and Jerry Tarr (who is still

running for Oregon) have both
done :13.5 for the NCAA record,
and McRae has done a wind-aided
:13.7 for his best mark.
Why, then, hasn't McRae shown
world class already, except in brief
flashes?
Football Is Villain
"Football is Bennie's downfall,'
Jones pointed out. "You simply
cannot play that game and still
be a top-notch hurdler. I think
if I were offered a pro football
contract I would turn it down.
Bennie's not a dedicated tracK-
man like me. He likes football
too much.

There is one simple reason, how-
ever, why McRae is choosing pro
football rather than keeping on"
running track after he graduates:
"My family comes first," put in
McRae, now a father. "I'd love
to run track and make the Olym-
pics," he said, but
Boo, Boo, AAU
The present situation for ost-
graduate trackmen in this coun-
try is not a happy one, according
to Jones and the amateurs he
knows.
"You have to take a pay dock
every time you take off to go to
a meet." explained Jones, a physi-
cal education teacher in Detroit.
"I think I've lost 500 dollars that
way in two years."
A man endowed with the talent
McRae has will turn naturally to
the sport which offers him the
most, and he feels that he just
cannot afford to pass up the op-
portunity to play pro football.
McRae, an all-conference left
halfback last season, is aiming
for a spot at flanker back with the
pros, so that he will be able to
put his speed to use as a pass-
catcher.
Not on Trees
About his main problem, his
size, he seems to feel the same
way as Michigan backfield coach
Hank Fonde does. "I think any
time you've got enough speed,
you've got enough weight," Fonde
commented after the football
season ended. "After all, you don't
find players with that much speed
and quickness every day (every-
body says McRae would be a :09.5
man in the 100-yd. dash) ."
And McRae thinks he can get up'
to 187 lbs. with weight-lifting to
move into the same range as
Baltimore's 190-lb. flanker, Lennie
Moore.
So for Bennie McRae, who has
been a football player built like
a trackman ever since ie came to
Michigan four years ago as the
leading high school ground-gainer
in Virginia, there are still some
goals he would like to reach before
he becomes a football player built
like a football player:
1) Beat Howard this Saturday
in defense of his Big Ten high
hurdle championship;
2) Beat Tarr next month to
come up with his first NCAA title;
3) Maybe even beat Jones, Tarr
and everybody else who has ever
whipped him when he was sub-
par physically to win his first
AAU championship next month.
And, oh yes, he would like to
get at least a share of that col-
legiate record in the process.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
first in a series of two stories deal-
ing with Michigan's chances in the
forthcoming Big Ten golf meet.
This article deals with the other
nine teams in the conference.)
By JIM BERGER
Five closely-matched teams and
a new rule will highlight the 1962
version of the Western Confer-
ence golf meet this weekend at
Champaign.
Minnesota, Purdue, Indiana,
Michigan State and Wisconsin all
will bring teams into the meet
that might walk away with the
crown. However, a new rule ini-
tiated this year could make this
conference meet anybody's.
In Single Round
The new rule will have each
team count the five low men in
each single round. The old rule
had it that a team would take
the five low men for the entire
72 holes.
Michigan golf Coach Bert Kat-
zenmeyer explains the significance
of this new rule. "In previous years
under the old rule, a player on
one team who shot his first two
rounds on the opening day in the
80's would usually be worth noth-
ing for the team," said Katzen-
meyer, "he would just go through
the motions on that last day,
Palmer "Takes
Open Tourney
FORT WORTH (P) - Pressure-
proof Arnold Palmer unleashed
another dazzling windup yester-
day to trip Johnny -Pott by four
strokes in an 18-hole playoff for
the $40,000 Colonial National In-
vitation Golf Championship.
Palmer, leading by one stroke
after nine holes, trimmed three
shots from par on the back nine
of the sprawling par 70 course
to capture his first title here and
pick up a fat $7,000 paycheck.
He had a 37 going out and, in
typical Palmer fashion, a red hot
32 coming in for a one-under-par
69.
Pott, who never led the power-
ful Latrobe, Pa.,belter, tacked to-
gether a 38-35-73 for second-
place money of $3,500.
The victory was the third
straight for Palmer, his sixth cur-
rent triumph and his 32nd major
championship. It boosted his 1962,
earnings to a fantastic total of
$59,308.
Pott's dismal finish was no doubt
particularly disappointing after
coming from seven shots behind
Saturday to tie Palmer with 72-
hole totals of 281, one over par.

knowing that his score wouldn't
be counted.
"Under the new rule, that same
player will be able to help his
team," he continued, "and even
the poorest golfer will have at
least one good round in four."
In last year's meet at Bloom-
ington, Ohio State took the crown.
Sparked by their number-one and
number-two men, Jack Nicklaus
and Mike Podolski, respectively,
the Buckeyes swept to victory.
Nicklaus, now a very successful
touring professional, took the in-
dividual medal with a one under
par 283 while Podolski notched a
299 for third place in the individ-
ual total.
Not This Year
This season there will be no
one dominating player such as
Nicklaus, and no team with the
one-two punch that the Buckeyes
had last season.
Taylor Cops
Golf Title
Bruce Taylor fired a blistering
tJniversity course record of a 10-
under par 62 to capture the First
Annual Michigan Daily Sports
Staff Golf Tournament Sunday.
A pay check for $3,500 was
awarded to the winner.
Taylor virtually ran away from
the field with a whopping eight-
stroke lead. Runner-up Dave Good
posted a two-under 70 to collect
second-place money of .$2,000
Dave (The Escanaba Flash) An-
drews and Gary (Player) Winer
dueled to a third place tie with
72's. They each picked up a check
for $1,200.
The tournament was sponsored
by The Michigan Daily sports staff
and the total purse was $16,000
(play money).
Taylor and Good played in the1
last threesome of the day and
there was some doubt as to who
had won the tournament. (All
scores were calculated according
to the Calloway system, which
subtracts poor holes from the
gross score.)
For Men and Women-
IT'S "CONTINENTAL"
HAIRSTYLES GALORE!!
"Tonsorial Querie invited"
-Completely air conditioned-
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigan Theater

Katzenmeyer rates Minnesota as
the prime contender with Pur-
due close behind. "I thought Min-
nesota had one of the best chances
to take it last year, and just about
everyone returns again this year,"
said Katzenmeyer.
The Gophers will be relying on
Rolf Demming, a senior this sea-
son who took second in the indi-
vidual crown last year with a 297.
Other top players for Minnesota
are junior Harry Newby and sen-
ior Jim Pfleider.
Well Balanced Team
Purdue, also a young team, will
be relying . on a well balanced
team. Junior Steve Wilkinson and
seniors Mark barnell and Jerry
Jackson are three big men for the
Boilermakers.
MichiganState with number-
one man Buddy Badger along with

seniors Gary Barrett and Gene
Hunt will also be right there in
the running. Indiana, also with
another well-balanced team, has
an equally good chance.
Wisconsin, which finished ninth
last year, has only one "claim to
fame" this season. They defeated
Minnesota, 36-0, in a triangular
meet.
Same Position
Of the other teams in the con-
ference, Iowa, Northwestern and
Michigan will be in about the same
position, all battling for a spot
in the first position. Ohio State
and Illinois appear to have real
troubles, and have little chance in
the upcoming meet.
The new rule will be significant
and with five teams battling for
the crown it will probably be as
Katzenmeyer predicts "anbody's
meet."

j

Ii,

Thesauri Veteris
FELIX A. PAPPALARDI, JR., Conductor
SUNDAY, MAY 2Q 8:30 P.m.
HILL AUDITORIUM

Admission Free

PROGRAM ..
Gabrieli
Telemann
Purcell
Pachelbel
Dencke
Mozart

SOLOISTS.3. .
Louis Stout
Willis Patterson
Gary Glaze
Walker Wyatt
Lavetta Loyd
Noel Papsdorf

Full Chamber Orchestra, Chorus
Brass Ensemble

BEN McRAE
... defends title

"Bennie might come around
every day and work for two hours.
When I work I might get out only
once a week, but it's a hard work-
out and I know exactly what part
of my form I'm working on.
"And there's another thing, too.
He has a tendency in the big
races to run the man and not the
hurdles, and you've got to run the
hurdles. I've noticed he shortens
up on his stride when he looks at
his man, and then he hits a flur-
dle," Junes commented.

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