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May 11, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1962

DISCOUNTING SYSTEM:
Notes Record Industry Chaos

BAR LEADERSHIP:
Mott Asks Lawyers' Aid
In Fighting Communism

.... .
.....

B'Nai Brith Hillel Foundation

By RUTH HETMANSKI
"Discounting practices in the
record industry have caused cha-
os," Richard Lionetti, district sales
manager 'of Columbia and Epic
Records; said Wednesday.
According to Lionetti, it all
started with the record clubs. The
small record-shop owners (deal-
ers) disliked the record clubs be-
cause they felt their business was
being cut into.
Record clubs offer their mem-
Department
Lists Winners
In Competition
The department of German has,
announced the winners in their
language and literature competi-
tions.
In the Kothe-Hildner competi-
tion for sophomores the winners
were: first place, John B. Delos,
'65; second place, Phyllis G. Sway-
zee, '64; third place, Richard G.,
Larry, '64.
EThe winners of the Bronson-
Thomas contest for juniors were:
first place, Sanford R. Weimer,
'63; second place, Joyce L. An-
drews, '63.
The Edgar Schwaibold competi-
tion for seniors was won by Doug-
las E. Miller, '62, first place, and
Donald T. Moon, '62, second place.
The awards are sponsored by
various private groups and indi-
viduals in the interest of fostering
the study ofGerman languages
and literature.

bers discounts, and the dealers
felt they could not keep up with
the competition.
Small Volume
They started discounting rec-
ords themselves, but their small-
er volume of sales made it more
difficult for them than for the
large distributors.
When word got out that there
was a 38 per cent profit in selling
records, hundreds of people rushed
to open up small record shops.
This huge increase in the num-
ber of people with no background
in record distribution and sales
further complicated the econom-
ics of the situation, as they tried'
to manipulate the market. Super-
markets and variety chains start-
ed selliig records.
As a;result of this greatly in-
creased volume of selling outlets,
the company's. distributors and
salesmen couldn't get around to
all the clients.
"Rack Jobbers"
Thus the "rack jobber" came
into existence. The rack jobber is
a sub-distributor who sells only
well-known and popular records
and LP's.
He guarantees that every record
will be sold, so the store owner has
the insurance that if a record the
rack jobber recommends does not
sell, it will be replaced by new
merchandise free.
Because he is helping the dis-
tributor, the rack jobber gets a
discount on the records he buys.
"One-Stop" Distributors
The "one-stop" is a sub-distrib-
utor who handles records from
several different makers at once,
which suits the convenience of
juke box operators.

rn

Instead of going around to sev-
eral companies, the juke box op-
erator simply goes to the "one-
stop" and receives his entire pro-
gram at once.
From all these complications
arises a breakdown in the distri-
bution scheme and the profit from
it. The rack jobber and the one-
stop are both getting discounts on
the records they buy from the
distributor, while the distributor
has lost his former accounts to
these very rack jobbers and one-
stops.
Profits Decline
The distributor's profit dimin-
ishes, and he has no way of stop-
ping the trend. The small dealer
cannot keep up with the discount
competition given by big chains,
who are not selling records for
profit but just as loss leaders to
get people in the store.
In addition, the small dealer
can't afford to carry the less pop-
ular records, so he loses much
business to bigger concerns..
Bootleggers
Bootlegging comes in to compli-
cate the situation. Bootleggers can
reproduce a record so that not
even the manufacturers can tell
it from the original. Thy are
flooding the market with records
which cost them only 30 cents
apiece to cut.
Morse Cites
Diffniculties
For Teachers
By JOAN SIMPSON
One of the failures of teachers
today is that they do not differen-
tiate the kind of deprivation from
which a child may suffer, Prof.
William C. Morse of the education
school said during a discussion
group yesterday.
Prof. Morse, who led a discus-
sion of the characteristics of suc-
cessful teachers in deprived areas
at the Conference on Teacher Ed-
ucation, viewed problems of
schools in areas with a highly tran-
sient population.
Must Understand Problems
One of the problems of these
areas is that they have a large
percentage of transient and an-
other percentage of stable enroll-
ment, he explained. Teachers tend
to stereotype schools as either one
or the other without taking indi-
vidual differences of students into
account.
The teacher's job is not only to
have the necessary teaching skills,
but also to understand the prob-
lems of such schools. To do this
they should have training in phil-
osophy and psychology as well as
methods, Prof. Morse noted.
In research on teaching in de-
prived areas, it has been found
that these teachers lack informa-
tion and sensitivity to the partic-
ular problems of these children.
Should Like Children
Prof. Morse said that another
important aspect of the success-
ful teacher is that she receives
satisfaction from the children
themselves rather than just their
work.
He added that it is also better
if the teacher works in a' setting
that allows for success, where
work conditions are supported by
the sympathetic attitude of the
principal and other teachers.
Must Assume Image
One of the problems confront-
ing the teacher, Prof. Morse ex-
plained, is that of "helping the
child to assume an image that is
reasonable but alien to our own."
This includes differences in time
prospective and hope for the fu-
ture.
Prof. Morse said that the main

problem in helping the teacher to
be successful in deprived areas is
providing an appropriate curricu-
lum adapted to the needs of these
children.
Club To Present
Films on Mideast
The Arab Student Club will pre-
sent two films of lectures by Prof.
Arnold Toynbee, "The A r a b
World's Case against the West"
and "The Arab's World Reaction
to Western Rule," at 8 p.m. to-
night in Rackham Amphitheatre.

LELAND J. KALMBACH
... award and speech

School Sets
Conference
On Business
The 32nd annual Alumni Con-
ference Program, sponsored by the
business school, will be held today
and tomorrow, with the highlight
being the special awards assembly
at 8 p.m. today in Aud. A.
Leland J. Kalmbach, president
of a Massachusetts life insurance
company, will receive the Busi-
ness Leadership Award, which is
provided by the business school's
student council and faculty.
Afterwards, he will speak on
"Free Enterprise in a Changing
World."
Registration for the two-day
program will take place between 2
and 2:30 p.m. today in the busi-
ness school lounge.
At 10 a.m. tomorrow in Rack-
ham Aud. Prof. Paul W. McCrack-
en will speak on "United States
Business in the World Economy."
Three afternoon sessions will be
held concurrently at 2 p.m. in the
business school. Prof. Douglas A.
Hayes of the business school will
lead a panel discussion on "Cor-
porate Acquisitions and Mergers"
in Rm. 130.
Halbert To Speak
Michael H. Halbert, an opera-
tions research specialist, will speak
on "Quantitative Measurement of
the Effectiveness of Advertising"
in Rm. 140.
Prof. George S. Odiorne of the
business school, director of the
Bureau of Industrial Relations,
will chair a discussion on man-
agement and industrial relations
in Rm. 141.

By GERALD STORCH
Citing the dominating influ-
ence by lawyers during the Amer-
ican revolution, Adm. William C.
Mott, Judge Advocate General of
the United States Navy, yesterday
urged a re-assertion of this lead-
ership in educating the public
about Communism.
In explaining his program of
"Operation Bar Leadership," Mott
rambled over topics including his
testimony before the Senate com-
mittee investigating m i I i t a r y
"muzzling," his participation in
anti-Communism seminars and the
practice of Communist Party lead-
ers speaking at universities.
The program was established by
the American Bar Association aft-
er its president asserted that only
two-tenths per cent of lawyers
could hold their own in a debate
with a Marxist, is composed of
seminars contrasting Communism
and capitalism.
'Quality Control'
As Mott related to the Stenis
Committee, he believes these sem-
inars should have "quality control"
-that is, the panel participants
should have expert knowledge
about Communism and capital-
ism.
He said the programs attempt
to present knowledgeable analyses
of the situation rather than right
or left-wing extremism. "I never
attend a seminar without knowing
who else is there. We have no need
for amateur anti-Communists or
professional witch-hunters,"
Therefore, the seminars feature
expert professors who analyze and
contrast the differing systems in
areas of law, education and philos-
ophy.
The programs also, usually have
a Federal Bureau of Investigation
IFC, Panhel
Give Awards
Inter-Fraternity Council and
Panhellenic Association presented
the awards for the outstanding af-
filiates to Deborah Cowles, '62,
last year's chairman of Woman's
Judiciary Council, and John Mar-
tin, '62, at the Fraternity-Sorority
Presidents' Banquet yesterday.
Two IFC scholarships of $175
were given to Arden Wander, '64,
and Sheldon Schreiberg, '64.

agent on hand to answer any ques-
tions about internal subversion.
'Truth Squads'
Mott also is planning to formu-
late "truth squads" to follow Com-
munists after their speeches at
universities. "I'm not opposed to
Gus Hall speaking at colleges, but
lawyers should go along and fol-
low up to expose the truth."
Mott pointed out that the armed
forces "spend more money on edu-
cation than all schools and col-
leges combined." He noted that, as
a more specific aspect, many states
are instituting Americanism vs.
Communism courses as required
work in high school.
A similar measure failed in the
Senate last month, but Mott pre-
dicted that Michigan would also
have such a course requirement in
the future.
If the schools will assume this
job, "we won't have to do this
training," Mott said.
Offers .Free
Dental Work
Persons interested in becoming
patients for the State Board Den-
tal Examinations are requested to
apply from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and
1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, May 14
through Friday, June 8 in the 2nd
floor Examination Room of the
School of Dentistry.
The exams will be held during
the week of June 11.
Patients selected must be a min-
imum of 16 years old. They are
needed for certain gold and amal-
gam fillings, and for teeth clean-
ing. There will not be a charge
made for those patients selected
for the State Boards.

All Are Welcome

is host to the Midwest Institute
at Sabbath Services
TONIGHT at 7:30 P.M.
Guest Speaker: DR. JACOB L. WEINSTEIN,
Rabbi, K.A.M. Temple, Chicago
"Judaism As Religious Obligation"
R. Weinstein also lectures
SATURDAY, MAY 12 at 2:00 P.M.
on Judaism as Social Obligation

HELD OVER
(through Monday)

4-~m

DIAL
8-6416

'A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE' is the first strong American film of
1962 and may well remain one of the year's best!"
-N. Y. Herald-Tribune
THE BOLDEST VIEW OF LIFE YOU HAVE EVER SEEN!

t

Judgment at Nuremberg"
Academy A ward Winner!
Best Actor! Best Screenpl'ay
Maxim///an Schell Abby Mann
EXCLUSIVE SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT!
NOW NO RESERVED SEATS! TODAY
THREE PERFORMANCES DAIL.Y!

I

Zwirdling-Cohn Chapel, 1429 Hill

CONCERT in JAZZ

Featuring the Michigan Stage Band
and the BOB JAMES TRIO
Sunday, May 13 at 8 p.m.
At The Union Ballroom
Admission 90c
Tickets on Sale at the Student Administration Building
from 1 to 4 p.m. and at the Door.
The League Garden Cafe
OPENS
MONDAY, MAY 14
HOURS: 8 A.M.--11 P.M.
Refreshments Available:
FRESH FRUIT y
O POTATO CH I PS
'COOK I ES U
CANDY
COKE MACHINE
ICE CREAM
*At themain desk

College To Hold Lectures,
Programs at Open House

DO-OR-DIE FOR NIXON:
CAN HE WIN IN CALIFORNIA?
Nixon is staking his career on the
gubernatorial race. Can he win? (He
carried the state in '60, but time
and political factors have changed.)
In this week's Post, you'll learn how
he's doing against a right-wing Re-
publican faction. How he's coping
with his Democratic opponent Pat
Brown. And why he thinks he went
down to defeat in 1960.
The Saturday Evening
TMAY 12
SISSUE/NOW
ON SALE

A film festival, displays of stu-
dent art work, lectures, a yard
party and a music program will
highlight the fifth annual College
of Architecture and Design Open
House today and tomorrow.
Beginning at 1 p.m. today the
Doug Brown Band will present
"Noise in Space" in the Arch. Aud.
Dean Philip N. Youtz will give
the official welcome at 2 p.m.,
after which David Lewis, British
residential architect, will discuss
"New Housing in Great Britain"
in an illustrated lecture.
Friday evening will open the
film festival of experimental films
in the Arch. Aud. "Under the
Brooklyn Bridge" and "Mounting
Tension" by Rudy Burckhardt,
free-lance New York photograph-
er-film maker, will begin the pro-
gram. "Pull My Daisy" by Robert
Frank, one-time Academy Award
nominee, will also be presented.
Present Lecture
At 1:30 p.m. tomorrow, "Visual
Environment," an illustrated lec-
ture, will be given by Prof. John
Walley of the architecture de-
partment of the University of Il-
linois at Navy Pier.
Tomorrow at 3:00 p.m., there
will be an open discussion of work
on display in the gallery. Through-
out the day potting demonstrations
will be given in the shop and yard.
All morning classes tomorrow vnill
be open to visitors.
At 3:30 p.m. in the College gal-
lery Richard Ahern, a city plan-
ner in Detroit, will discuss "Con-
cepts of City Planning."
Film Festival Continued
The film festival will be contir-
ued at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow. "Sin
of Jesus," Frank's film nominated
for an Academy Award, "Millions
in Business as Usual," by Burck-
hardt, and "Two Short Films" and
"The House" by George Manupelli

will be presented. Manupelli, a
teacher at Central Michigan Tni-
versity, is a painter and sculptor
who has branched into experi-
mental, films. Films by Stanley
Brakhage will be announced.

U Pu

*

ENDING SATURDAY

DIA L 2-6264
.JI D D A II,,a

THAT HILARIOUS ~I il~l i i~~l ~i
COMEDY TEAM n°l mi n" ' q quuq
IS BACK again ~t?
{.«. ~jv - ON P AULA PRENTIS
JACK CARTER
' 'CihemaScope .'METROCOLO.
0H1ReeVITAL LIEUTENANT

lllb

~I uiJI1 H l hDial 2-6264
,la eu * STARTING SUNDAY *
X1i Shows start at 1:00-2:55-4:55-7:00 and
fi llt ua i l l~yl i 1 41 HIf 9:00. Feature 10 minutes later.
0FREVIEWOR
"THE z BEST FILM OF THE YE NAIOA
"SPECIAL ACCOLADE"
AND A-1 RATING
ij'_ ..-National Legion of Decency

Shows 2-5:10-8:30 P.M.
Mat. $1.00 - Eve. $1.25

JUDGMENT
NUREMBSERGJ

MICHIGAN THEATRE

~So.Go.C.Cinema quild
Friday and Saturday, May 11 and 12 Sunday, May 13
NO TARNISHED ANGELS

*
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