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May 03, 1962 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Panel Debates French Policy

Symposium Studies
Movements in Music

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Across Campus

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ism, calling it "irreconcilable" with
a unified Europe.
He said that de Gaulle "wants
to use the Common Market as an
instrument of his own policy."
French independence from the
Western nations, stemming from
nationalism, is a major block be-
fore there can be any European
unification under one political
government, Kruithof added.
Defending French reluctance to
identify too closely with United
States foreign policy, Bernard Lev-
rat, 'Grad., of Switzerland said
that France should act as the ori-
ginator of new policies and ap-
proaches to the many impasses
between East and West.

Since France would be in the,
middle of the next war, it has the
right to assert its own views and
policies, Levrat continued.
Trying to explain French insis-
tence on military and atomic in-
dependence from NATO, Carol
Blinder, '62, an American, suggest-
ed that France might fear Ameri-
can hesitance to defend French
interests, and therefore demand
her own military capabilities.
Miss Blinder recalled the history
of economic and political alliances
among Atlantic countries since the
war, but emphasized what she
called the dampening effect of
French nationalism under de
Gaulle.

by PHYLLIS ABRAHAMS
During the 14th century, Ars
Nova, a new movement in music,
weakened medieval rationalism in
music, the Rev. Fidelis Smith of
De Paul University said Sunday.
"Ars Nova, a Re-Definition" was
the first of four lectures in the
morning session of the symposium
of Midwest Chapters of the Ameri-
can Musicological Society and the
Music Library Association.
In order to re-define Ars Nova,
Father Smith called first for a
re-study of its predecessor, Ars
Antigua. This musical taste based
its consonance on strict conform-
ity to rational medieval philosophy

Bone Bank
By DONNA ROBINSON
The University Temporal Bone
lank Center has entered a cooper-
ative agreement, sponsored by the
Deafness Research Center in New
York, which includes banks all
over the nation and whose admin-
istrative center will be located at
the University of'Chicago.
The purpose of this center is to
coordinate research on deafness
which is already being carried on
at all the member banks. Patients
who have been affected with deaf-
ness or vertigo will now will their
temporal bone, consisting of the
bones of the middle and inner ear,
to the central bone bank instead
of the individual banks.
The individual banks, however,

Center Joins Agreement

lose nothing through this coordin-
ation, Dr. Merle Lawrence, Direc-
tor of the Kresge Hearing Re-
search Institute, said. If a doctor
has convinced a patient of the
value of willing his temporal bone
to the bank, the doctor's own in-
stitution, along with the patient's
complete hearing history, are
placed on file at the central bank,
which upon receipt of the bone
sends it to the individual bank.
The advantages of this system
are threefold, Dr. Lawrence said.
First the center gives financial aid
to ,the member institutions to aid
in carrying on their research.
Second, it provides a coordina-
tion of records which make cer-
tain that the patient's temporal
bone will get back to the right

bank no matter where he dies.
Each patient who has decided to
will his temporal bone to the cen-
ter carries a card stating that he
has done so and giving a number
to call for instructions on the
handling of the bones, Dr. Law-
rence said.
The third advantage is that the
new center will provide a collect-
ing point for pathological infor-
mation. This information can be
used in the teaching of ear path-
ology to eye, ear, and throat stu-
dents.
Once the bones reach the indi-
vidual banks they are cut into
very thin slices, then examined for
abnormalities, Dr. Lawrence ex-
plamed.

and the perfect mathematical di-
vision of threes.
In reaction to this rationalism,
Ars Nova introduced the harsh,
dissonant and irrational into mu-
sic.
Sharp Notations
In the second lecture, "Punto
Intenso Contra Remiso," Willi
Apel of Indiana University pre-
sented a discussion on the nota-
tion of sharps or flats and the
natural of the same note when
played simultaneously.
A problem arises in the manner
of notation from original sources
of sixteenth and seventeenth cen-
tury music, which often does not
allow for the sustained validity of
the notation throughout the meas-
ure as does modern notation. Often
the notation was valid for the
simultaneous tone only, he said.
The third lecturer, Prof. Hans
Tischier of Roosevelt University,
discussed "Classicism and Ro-
manticism in Thirteenth Century
Music."
He cited a close parallel between
thirteenth century music and the
significant changes in the fields of
politics and art during the vital
age of King Louis III of France,
Henry III of England, St. Francis
of Assissi and Thomas Aquinas.
Serious Modes
Early thirteenth century music
was related to the serious art
modes of the age. The gothic style
had turned into a kind of classi-
cism, in which gargoyles and mon-
sters were discarded and the
figures became less decorative and
more functional.
However, by the middle of the
century, this functional gothic
style had become "almost Ba-
roque" in prettiness and elegance
of decoration, Prof. Tischler noted.
This romantic strain in music
included a change in subject mat-
ter. In the earlier works, the sub-
jects had -been Christ, Mary, and,
moral sermonettes in Latin texts
and a great many pastorals and
some love poems in the French
texts.
With the advent of romanticism,
Christ and the moral sermonettes
disappeared, although Mary re-
mained as part of the love poetry.
The classical pastorals entirely
disappeared; social texts replaced
the highly religious, and the love
texts increased greatly, he said.

Prof. Arthur M. Eastman of the
English department will moderate
a five-member panel on "Vitaliz-
ing Class Presentation" today at
4 p.m. in Aud. C.
The discussion is the last in a
series of three discussions, and
deals with closed circuittelevision
for medical instruction and other
instructional uses. The panel will
consist of Profs. H. Harlan Bloom-
er of the speech department, Rich-
ard D. Judge of the medical school,
Ford L. Lemler of the audio-vis-
ual center, and Edgar E. Willis of
the speech department.
* * * -
Prof. Joseph B. Keller of the
Courant Institute of Mathematical
Science, New York University, will
hold a colloquium under the aus-
pices of the departments of engi-
neering mechanics and mathemat-
ics, on "Elastic Wave Propaga-
tion." at 4 p.m. today in 229 West
Engineering.
* * *
Prof. Herbert C. Youtie, research
professor of papyrology, will give
the annual Henry Russel Lecture
at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow in the
Rackham Amphitheater, on the
topic "The Papyrologist: Artificer
of Facts."
Pick Students
.For Sheffield
Eleven students have been se-
lected to spend the next semester
studying at the University of Shef-
field. They are Tamara Ackerman,
'64; Jeffry Drelles, '63Ed; Martha
Hess, '64; Ruth Hornburg, '63Ed;
Lynn Hughes, '63Ed; Joan Israel,
'64; Janet Jedele, '62Ed; Judith
Ludwig, '64; Sharon McCue, '63;
Linda Playdon,. '63; Ann Schultz,
'63Ed.

I

The botany department is spon-
soring a lecture by Frans A. Staf-
leu of the International Associa-
tion for Plant Taxonomy in Ut-
recht, Netherlands.on"Michael
Adanson and his Position in 18th
Century Botany in France" at 4:15
p.m. today in the East Conference
Rm. of Rackham Bldg.
The chemistry department is
sponsoring a lecture by Charles
Depuy of Iowa State University
on the "Synthesis and Reactions
of Cyclopropanol" at 8 p.m. today
in Rm. 1300 Chemistry Bldg.

Dial NOB 5-6290
ENDING TONIGHT z
RODGERS & HAMMERSTEIN'S Mi~
STATE FAIR
COL OR by - .w.
* STARTING FRIDAY *
Walt Disney
Top Comedy Hit
"MOON
PILOT"

I

RESEARCH LECTURE:
Explains Cause for Rise
Of Venereal Diseases

By JOAN SIMPSON
"The greatest cause of the rise
in venereal diseases is the relaxa-
tion of VD control at a time of
one of the greatest social phe-
nomena the migration of south-
ern, rural Negroes to northern cit-
ies, said Prof. Frank W. Reynolds
at the Pi Lambda Theta (Asso-
'I
DIAL NO 8-6416
n ENDING TONIGHT
'Solid
entertain-
-W1insten~
Nv. Y. Post
AIA SCHELLt STUART WHTiiiAN
~and 200 STEIGER as Oa McNally
KtoMinu tlDistributing, Ibc. Rluas
- -FRIDAY
THE BOLDEST VIEW OF LIFE
YOU HAVE EVER SEEN!

PREVIEW*
of the recent CBS-TV Program
starring the new
U-M CO. OF BRILLIANT
BROADWAY PLAYERS
coming next Fall.
plus "THE IDEA OF MICHIGAN," new color film.
produced by the U-M TV Center
Two showings: Fri., May 4, 3:30 P.M. and Sat., May 5,
11 A.M. Rackhom Amphitheatre
ADMISSION FREE

ciation of Women in Education)
conference on "A Better Future
for Children Through Research."'
"From the end of World War II
to 1958, the occurence of VD de-
creased considerably, but since
1958 there has been a substantial.
increase. For example, in Michigan
the number of cases has increased
from 85 in 1958 to 310 in 1961."
Prof. Reynolds noted the fact that
teen-agers between the ages of 15
and 19 were responsible for 18.1
per cent of the cases.
Minority Groups
In a study of 600 teen-agers af-
flicted with VD in New York City,
Prof. Reynolds said that they
found that these people were from
low-income families in minority
groups, and whose cultural and
educational training was "impov-
trished."
"These teen-agers did not come
from demoralized families, how-
ever. They had, for the most part
curfews, and certain parental
standards of behavior," he added.
Only 15 per cent of those inter-
viewed were high school graduates,
and all had school records char-
acterized by lack of interest in
subjects, repeating of grades, and
80 per cent were guilty ofhserious
truancy. When asked what they
did in their spare time, 509 out of
the 600 said they did "nothing."
'Shankers'
In a movie Dr. Reynolds had
shown to the group, it was brought
out that the primary and second-
ary symptoms of syphilis, tiny
sores called "shankers", can easily
be cured by shots of penicillin.
List Additions
To Honorary
The following names were omit-
ted from the list in yesterday's
Daily of men tapped by Sphinx:
David Campbell, 64 Ed; Harvey
Chapman, 64 LSA; Henry Fau-
quier, 64 LSA: and David Good,
64 LSA.
Prof. Andrew De Rocco of the
chemistry department was tapped
as an honorary member.

U of M Folklore Society
MEETING
FOLK SING
(everybody come, bring
your instruments)
TOMORROW 8 P.M.
Union, 3rd floor conference
room or Diag,
depending on the weather
Read
Daily
Classifieds

1

We are now
Delivering
PIZZA and SUBS
DOMINICKS
No 2-5414

PAID ADVERTISEMENT
(PRESENTS
THURSDAY and FRIDAY at 7 and 9
Rene Clair's
THE GHOST GOES WEST
Robert Donat, Jean Parker,
Eugene Pallette

MICHIGAN UNION
Presents
ANOTHER
SOK-HOP
TONIGHT
9m,12
UNION BALLROOM
Music by
DOUG BROWN'S BAND
BERMUDAS $1.00
ALLOWED per couple

PLUS Festival
(Pablo,
SATURDAY

in Puerto Rico
Cosa s)
and SUNDAY

Robert Ruark's
SOMETHING OF VALUE
Rock Hudson, Sidney Poitier,
Dana Wynter

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- v.M1Y "4 ' '

UNION INTERNATIONAL

SEMINAR
~VI ET NAM-
WHAT NEXT?"
Sponsored by
International Affairs Committee
of the Michigan Union

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Starting FEATURE STARTS AT
1:10-3:10-5:10-7:10 & 9:10
DIAL NO 2-6264 TODAY -
T PLANTS A GLORY-FLAATOPALLBATTLE STORIES!
The Guts'n' Greatness Story Of The Flag-Raising,
Hell-Raising Heroes Of Mt. Surabachil

The two names which stand
out as having contributed most
to the development of film
comedy are Rene Clair and
Charlie Chaplin. One need de-
scribe but a few of Clair's comic
scenes to affirm the truth of
his comic genius. In Entr'aete
we discover a hearse pulled by
a camel. The hearse suddenly
breaks away and rushes
through the streets. The leg-
less cripple who is one of the
many following behind finds
the pace too quick so.he gets up
and runs after it. There are
also , "repeated shots photo-
graphed from below, of a grace-
ful ballerina whose skirt opens
and falls like a lovely flower as
she dances-until a final slowly
rising shot reveals her to be a
heavily bearded gentlemen with
pince-nez." In The Crazy Ray
"a group of travellers alight
from their plane; atop the Eif-
fel Tower they discover that.
all Paris is in the grip of a
mysterious paralyzing ray..
As they pass through the city
they discover its inhabitants
frozen into the most delight-
fully grotesque positions - a
pickpocket caught in the act,
two sandwich-men bending over
to pick up the same franc ..."
Finally, when they find the
mad inventor who has all Paris
in his power and are able to
convince him to push the but-
ton that will set Paris alive
once more, "everything goes out
of gear, first too fast, then too
slow."
Clair went to England in 1955
and made The Ghost Goes West
-the story of Donald Glourie,

castle comes the family ghost
(Robert Donat). But the Ghost
too has his problems, one of
which is finding himself plunk-
ed into the middle of a gunfight
on the New York docks. From
here on you are in the hands of
the Ghost and Rene Clair.
Robert:Ruark gained national
attention in 1952 through his
reports in the Luce magazines
on the Mau-Mau rebellion, ac-
counts that were bitterly re-
sented by African students for
his misrepresentations. Later,
his sensational novel on the
same theme, Something of
Value, became a best-seller and
served to propagate notions as
contrary to historical accuracy
as to international understand-
ing. The public credulously
adopted the view that the Mau-
Mau had reverted to barbarism,
slaughtering thousands of Eur-
opeans- under Communist in-
stigation. Actually, the quarrel
had its origin in the confis-
cation of the land of the Kiku-
yu tribe; and the atrocities
visited upon a few dozen Euro-
peans and their help were re-
repaid by equal atrocities upon
a much larger number of Ki-
kuyu and the eventual incar-
ceration in concentration
camps of thousands of this un-
fortunate tribe, guilty or no.
When Richard Brooks, the
director assigned by MGM to
film the book, arrived in Ken-
ya, he, found the novel so at
variance with the facts that he
rewrote whole parts of the
story. The product, while san-
guinary enough to satisfy the
popcorn public, tries to show

Rooms 3-R and

S

Thursday, May 3rd
4-91- P.M

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