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May 02, 1962 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

vul

_______________________U______________________ 1 ~~i

ANNOUNCE SCHEDULE

:

To Feature Choral Union,
Operas in New Season
William Steinberg, will appear-

Feb 4. On March 3, the Tokyo
Classical Ballet, "Komaki," will
perform. The Toronto Symphony
Orchestra, with Walter Susskind
conducting, is scheduled for
March 13 to end the Choral Union
series. Anne Fischer, piano solo-
ist, making her first Ann Arbor
appearance, will play with the or-
chestra.
Present "Carmen"
Oh the Extra Series, Bizet's
"Carmen" will be presented Oct.
20. This opera is the Wagner Op-
era Company production of the
New York Opera Festival.
Following "Carmen" will be the
National Ballet of Canada Nov. 9.
Verdi's "Rigoletto," produced by
the New York City Opera, will be
performed Nov. 18. The NDR Sym-
phony Orchestra of Hamburg,
conducted by Hans Schmidt-Is-
sertedt, is scheduled for Jan. 16.
Birgit Nilsson, Swedish dramatic
soprano with the Metropolitan
Opera Company, will conclude the
Extra Concert Series March 18.
Miss Nilsson, who appeared in
last year's May Festival, has ap-
peared in many operatic roles,
among them Burnhildes, Isolde,
Aide, Tosca and Turandot.
Chamber Music
The 23rd Chamber Music Fes-
tival will include five concerts fea-
turing the Budapest Quartet per-
forming the complete cycle of
Beethoven quartets. Scheduled for
Dec. 1 and 2, it features the Uni-
versity Choral Union, the Sym-
phony Orchestra, Saramae En-
dich, soprano, Louise Parker, con-
Sphinx Taps
New Members
Sphinx, junior men's honorary,
last night tapped the following 27
men to comprise the 57th Court'
of Sphinx.
Peter Aronson, '64, Douglas"
Bickle, '64Ed, Phillip Bolton, '64,
Roy Burry, '64, Robert Gray, '64,
David Hayes, 64Nat Res, David
Hoekenga, '64, Mac Hunter, '64Ed,
Curtis Huntington, '64, Ronald
Kramer, '64.
Steven Linker, '64, Frank Lude,
'64, Enn Maynard,,'64, Robert Mc-
Kenzie, '64, Kenneth Miller, '64,
Jeffrey Moore, '64, Ross Morrison,
'64, Gary Mouw, '64, Raymond
Rusnak, '64, Ronald Tate, '64Ed,
Gary Wilcox, '64, Gordon Wilkie,
'64, Frank Wold, '64.
DIAL NO 8-6416
Ending Thursday
"A FINE PICTURE .
I SALUTE IT!"
-The New Yorker

tralto, Rolf Bjoerling, tenor, and
Norman Farrow, bass. Mary Mc-
Call Stubbins will play the organ
and Lester McCoy will conduct.
Included in the Chamber Music
Festival are the Chicago Little
Symphony conducted by Thor
Johnson. May Festival Choral Un-
ion conductor, and Julian Bream,
London guitarist and lutist, who
will be making his third tour of
America.
The Chicago, Little Symphony,
organized by Johnson two years
ago, consists of 20 musicians who
have concertized throughout the
United States.
The 17th annual May Festival
will be presented May 9-12, again
with the Philadelphia Orchestra,
Eugene Ormandy conducting. Or-1
mandy, conductor of this year's
May Festival, received an honor-
ary music degree from the Univer-
sity in 1952. He has been musical
director and conductor of the
Philadelphia Orchestra since 1936,
Each summer he conducts orches-
tras in major European capitals.
Commenting on the addition of
operas to the Choral Union and
Extra Concert Series, Rector noted
that the operas will be presented
by the most prominent companies
touring the United States.
"This is our first opportunity to
have these companies perform in
Hill Aud, since for the first time
we have the necessary orchestra
pit," he said.
Open Petitioning
For Committee ,
Petitioning for three positions
on Student Government Council's
committee on membership opened
Monday and will continue until
May 11. Two of the positions are
for full year terms and one for a
half year, Council President Stev-
en Stockmeyer, '63, said. Inter-
viewing will be on May 13 and
Council will fill the positions at
the May 16 meeting.

AAUP Cites
Two Schools
In Censure
(Continued from Page 1)
Board of Regents by the college
president which recommended that
to improve the college, seven mem-
bers of the staff be discharged.
Prof. Worzella, one of the seven,
was not listed because of any
academic problems, but because
of "an aggressive noncompliance."
Concern for Freedom
The Bulletin article stated that
"..there is concern on the part
of many of the faculty about the
state of academic freedom and
tenure at their institution ... in
this case, it is clear that a faculty
member who does not work for
'harmony' or who becomes 'con-
troversial' is subject to discharge
with no assurance of a hearing,
or regard generally for accepted
principles of due process."
In the case of Allen University,
which was removed from the cen-
sure list, "it was felt that the
administration had done all it
could to insure academic freedom
on campus. When the administra-
tion corrects itself, Committee 'A'
(which investigates complaints
from professors) recommends the
censure be removed," Prof. Ken-
nedy said.
University Censured
The University had been placed
on the AAUP censure list in 1955
but was removed from the list in
1959 when certain of the Regents
Bylaws were altered to insure
the rights of faculty members.
The number of complaints from
faculty members of violation of
"due academic freedom" has risen
markedly this year. In 1960, 36
cases were reported. The following
year, the total increased by only
one. However, during the first
four months of 1962, 55 complaints
have been lodged, Prof. Peek said.
The AAUP salary schedule re-
vealed that state and municipal
universities are in serious danger
of falling behind private institu-
tions in quality unless they im-
prove salaries.

Tornado Damage

Committee,
Sawyer Set
Suggestions
The Student Resource Commit-
tee on the Oxford Road Project
which worked with former As-
sembly Association Sally Jo Saw-
yer, '62. helped her formulate and
suggest plans for the project.
"They made quite a few sugges-
tions, and they would go over the
plans and criticize them. Most of
what they suggested was adopted,"
she said. The committee worked
from a basic plan which was
formulated about three years ago.
The committee consisted of a
student from, the architecture
college and girls from several Uni-
versity cooperatives.
"They suggested such things as
placement of fire exits, storage
space and even had a few things
to say about the furniture."
The plans for kitchens in the
coop and the problem of whether
there should be furniture built
into the wall were also studied by
the committee.
"They were quite helpful, be-
cause I didn't know much about
cooperative living and the formu-
lating of actual plans," Miss Saw-
yer explained.
1Assembly will be setting up a
standingcommittee next fall on
the Oxford Project which will op-
erate under the present Assembly
Housing Committee.

TONIGHT
INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE
of the NEWMAN CLUB
Presents a PANEL DISCUSSION
"Problems of the Church in South Americo,

331 Thompson

8:00 P.M.

we

TOMORROW NIGHT:
Direct from
the Michigras Parade !
Wdsi'pin e
eaytime liie (+2)

--Daily-Ed Langs
WRECKAGE-A small tornado slammed into Pinckney, 15 miles
from Ann Arbor Monday, demolishing a lumberyard and damaging
three other buildings in the town. The small tornado was part of a
severe weather system which lashed the state Monday, killing one
and injuring 11.
DISCRIMINATION:
Local NAACP Claims
Council Not Effective

for Dancing,
Listening,

etc.

AT THE AMERICAN LEGION
1035 S. Main 9-12 P.M. $1

The Ann Arbor chapter of thev
National Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored People has
sent a letter to the Ann Arbor
City Council accusing the Council
of failure to protect the Negro cit-
izens of Ann Arbor from racial
discrimination.
The letter also charged that
statements had been made at a
Students To Hold
Annual Art Sale
Students in the architecture col-
lege will hold their annual Art
Auction at 3:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. to-
day in the lobby of the Architec-
ture and Design Bldg.

meeting of the Council and the
Human Relations Commission
which intimated genetic inferior-
ity of Negroes.
Democratic First Ward Council-
man Lynn W. Ely denied that the
statement had actually been made,
but he contended that some ques-
tions and answers given during
the meeting led to the conclusion
of racial inferiority. Republican
Fifth Ward Councilman John R.
Laird denied that any such discus-
sion had taken place.
Ely then moved that the Coun-
cil make a statement that Negroes
are not genetically inferior. This
motion was tabled until copies of
the NAACP letter could be dis-
tributed to all the Council mem-
bers.

- -- - - - - V - win"

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jThe Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m., two days preceding
publication.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 2
General Notices
Thayer Street Parking Structure, Ef-
DIAL NO 5-6290
-. RODGERS AND
NAM -RS - NS M

fective April 30, 1962. The two openl
decks on top of Thayer Street Structure
will be made available to students for
parking purposes. Student users of this
space will pay for their parking at the
rate of 25 cents per day. This assign-.
ment of parking space is on a tempor-
ary basis and will be effective until
further notice.
The Spring written examinations for
the Masters Degree in Political Science
will be held on May 7, 8, and 9. The
schedule of examinations according to
field and subfield, will be posted on the
departmental bulletin board.
Opening Mon., May 7 - Henry IV,
Part II, on the new semi-Elisabethan
stage in Trueblood Aud. Frieze Bldg.,
presented by the University Players, De-
partment of Speech. Box office open at
1:00, Mon., May 7. Tickets $1.50, $1.00
for Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs.; $1.75,
$1.25 for Fri. and Sat.
Establishment ofthe Continued Enroll-
ment Deposit Governing Undergraduates
at the University of Michigan for the
Fall Semester of 1962
In order to manage its overall enroll-
ment more efficiently and guarantee
each bona fide undergraduate student
a place in that enrollment, the Uni-
versity has adopted the following regu-
lations and procedures, effective im-
mediately, which establish a continuing
deposit for undergraduate students.
1. Continuing Students
A. Each residence-credit undergradu-
ate student is required to establish and
maintain a continuing deposit of $50 to
hold his enrollment privilege at the
University. This deposit may be return-
ed to the enrollee when, upon proper
notification (see I, C) from him, he re-
linquishes his enrollment privilege forI
subsequent semesters.

B.mProcedure to Establish the Enroll-
ment Deposit.
1) For undergraduate students who
have $50 on deposit for University hous-
ing-:
The establishment of this continuing
deposit will not only guarantee each
undergraduate's enrollment privilege
but will replace the current $50 housing
deposit.* Arrangements are therefore
being made by the Offices of the Dean
of Men and the Dean of Women to
transfer current $50 housing deposits
into the continuing enrollment deposit
account between April 19 and May 4.
This action will eliminate the need to
maintain two $50 deposits for even a
short period of time but it will protect
the housing as well as the enrollment
equities of undergraduates living in
University owned and operated hous-
ing.
2) For all other continuing under-
graduate students:
Continuing undergraduate students
who do not have $50 on deposit for
University housing must guarantee their
enrollment privileges at the University
by paying a $50 continuing deposit at a
special station located in the lobby of
the SAB. Student identification cards
will be required for imprinting the re-
ceipt at the time deposits are estab-
lished. Deposits must be paid between
April 19 and May 4 according to the.
following alphabetical schedule:
April 19-A-Bot April 27-Merf-Pick
April 20-Bou-Cro May 1-Pica-Send
April 23-Crp-Fz May 2-7Sene-Tup
April 24-Ga-How May 3-Tuq-Z
April 25-Hox-LamIaApr 26-Lamj -Mere
C. Undergraduate students who plan
to disenroll (drop-out, or transfer to
the Schools of Medicine or Dentistry)
at the end of this spring semester must
inform the Office of Registration and
Records in writing before June 30 so as

to qualify for the return of the con-
tinuing enrollment deposit. Deposits will
be returned by mail. Those undergrad-
uate students who have made reserva-
tions for residence halls housing must
also notify the Office of the Dean of
Men or the Dean of Women by June 30.
II. Newly Admitted Students
A. Each newly admitted undergraduate
student, and each undergraduate stu-
dent returning after an absence of one
or more semesters, is required to make
an advance non-refundable enrollment
deposit of $50 in order to hold the ad-
mission privilege granted him.
B. Upon completion of enrollment,
this non-refundable deposit will become
a continuing enrollment deposit return-
able to the student when, upon proper
notification from him (see I,C), he re-
linquishes his enrollment privilege for
subsequent semesters.
*-Graduate and professional students
who continue to live in University resi-
dence halls are expected to maintain a
$0 housing deposit.
For further information, call Office
of the Vice-President for Student Af-
fairs, 1524 Admin. Bldg. (663-1511, Ext.
3146).
Events
Guest Lecturer of the Center for
Southern Asian Studies, Han van Buite-
nen, Department of Linguistics, The
University of Chicago; a unique show-
ing of a Vedic Sacrifice filmed in
Poona, India, 8:00 p.m., Rackham As-
sembly Room, Wed., May 2, 1962.
Film Showing: Atomic Weapons and
Fire, covering the possibility of acci-
dental detonation, and Ace in the Hole,
the story of the Minuteman missile,
(Continued on Page 4)

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UNION INTERNATIONAL
SEMINAR
"VET 1NAM -
WHAT NEXT?
Sponsored by
International Affairs Committee
of the Michigan Union
Rooms 3-R and S
Thursday, May 3rd.
4:5P.M.
Featuring a PANEL of
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

stNfIan
PAT
BOONE
BOBBY
DARIN
PAMEA
FRIDAY * TIFFIN
"MOON IANN-
PILOT" U ARGRET
STARTS MAY 11 th
"JUDGMENT
AT
NUREMBERG"'
. ENDING TONIGHT .
TROY DONAHUE
"LOVERS MUST LEARN"
Domestic Title
"Rome Adventure"

BLOCK

ORDERS

It I

GET BEST SEATS NOW BY MAIL
NEXT WEEK--MONDAY THRU SATURDAY-8 P.M.
University Pla yers present
William Sh akespeare's

I

11

DIAL NO 2-6264
r

HENRY

IV,

for
THE GLEE CLUB CONCERT
begin
TODAY
at HILL AUDITORIUM
from 8 AM. to 5 P.M.
ANY GROUP OF TEN
CONSTITUTES A BLOCK

* STARTING THURSDAY *

PART TWO
BEST SEATING AVAILABLE FOR MONDAY AND TUESDAY
qmminmmminmmm s=mmmmmmmmu Uim mi=n=inma mm=in===inmmu *m=mm=nmm=n=n *minminm
* U
Send order to: U-M Players, Dept. of Speech FB,
* For Monday thru Thursday:
* Enclosed find $ for (number) tickets at (check one) $1.50 Q, $1.00 E, '
for (indicate preference) Mon., May 7 , Tue., May 8 , Wed., May 9 , Thur., ;
* May 10 e.
r U
For Friday or Saturday:
I Enclosed find $ for tickets at $1.75 Q, $1.25 n, for Fri., May 11. , I
Sat., May 12
SCheck one: i

11

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I

11

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