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May 01, 1962 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-05-01

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TUESDAY, MAY 1, 1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PA

'WRONG VALUES':
Panelists Bemoan Cultural Lag

By ELIZABETH ROEDIGER
The creative arts in Detroit and
Michigan are not receiving the
attention they should, four panel-
ists on the McGregor-Detroit Ad-
venture Conferences agreed Sun-
day.
"There is something wrong with
the values of the state and coun-
try when a pithecanthrope lout
with a guitar can make a million
by bumping and grinding on a
stage, while Bela Bartok died des-
titute in New York City a few
years ago," Charles B. Culver, a
Detroit artist said.
Vice-president and Director of
Dearborn Center William B. Stir-
ton, chairman of the Art Com-
mission of the State of Michigan,
called the cultural growth of Mich-
igan "a matter of social and eco-
nomic importance."
Secretary of Cultural Affairs
Although a full-fledged Secre-
tary of Cultural Affairs has at
least been established by President
John F. Kennedy, people have yet
to' demand the creative arts on
their own, Karl Haas of radio
station WJR noted.
Michigan is especially guilty of
this apathy, the panel agreed. The
New York State Cultural Com-
mission receives $450,00 annually,
while its Michigan counterpart
has no operating budget. The De-.
troit Art Museum operates on $3
million annually, while t h e
museum in Cleveland, a city half
the size, receives $40 million a
year.
Root of Problem
"We as a nation have not cul-
turally reached the heights we
have attained technologically,"
Minoru Yamasaki, Detroit archi-
tect, added. He called the auto-
mobile factories, which are built
with "a lack of care," the root
of the architectural problems in
Detroit and Michigan.
The panel and its moderator,
Wayne State University president
Triangles List New
Members Tapped
Triangles, the junior men's En-
gineering honorary, has tapped the
following for membership: Richard
Belger, Laureen Bowler, Andrew
Crawford, Frederick Gilson, David
Kurtz, Paul Levy, Jeffery Long-
streth, Robert Moore, Carl Rhodes
Jay Sampson and Harry Taxin.

Clarence B. Hilberry agreed that
federal subsidy and support will
be needed to 'give cultural growth
the uplift it needs.
"Couldn't we send one less mis-
sile around the world every so
often and thus support the crea-
tive arts and artists while still
maintaining the defense of our na-
tion?" Culver asked.

In addition to the support of
the federal government, it is time
that private concerns, American
businesses, the general public and
especially American labor also give
their financial and moral support,
the panel agreed.
Yamasaki summed up this feel-
ing by saying, "If there is a
future, it is in our hands."

Salaries :of 'U' Students
Increase Seven Per Cent

The salaries which graduates of
the University may expect to com-
mand when they are job-hunting
has increased seven per cent above
1961 levels, campus placement of-
ficers report.
"The more companies that come
to the campus, the more that have
to come. More firms are entering
the recruiting market each year,
prompting more spirited bidding.
Those that did not get the people
they wanted last year, hope to this
year. And if they don't salaries
won't be the main reason why,"
Prof. Arthur S. Hann of the busi-
ness administration school said.
Median salaries offered for mas-
ter's candidates in business ad-
ministration is $585, six per cent
over 1961. Bachelor's bring $495,
up three to four per cent.
Demand for Accountants
Hann also noted the great de-
mand for accountants in public,
industrial and government ac-
counting. "There isn't nearly
enough personnel for public ac-
counting jobs," he explained.
Accounting, finance and bank-
ing are the strongest fields at the
master's level: "Some 21 banks
had been the previous high, but
25 from coast to coast checked in
this spring," Hann continued.
"Most have raised their offering
salaries and are competing with
industry."
In the engineering college, bach-,
elor degrees average $575 monthly,
up ;six per cent. Some industries,
mainly west coast missile firms,
are promising up to $600. Engi-
neers with their masters can ex-
pect offers of x$686, seven per cent
above last year. Doctoral engineers
can attract about $950.
Liberal Arts
For liberal arts candidates, the
men are averaging $471 and the

women, $416, Mildred Webber of
the Bureau of Appointments and
Occupational Information said.
An increased call for librarians
and economists was noted. This
may be due to the growth of com-
pany and industrial libraries. Gov-
ernment agencies are demand-
ing more economists. Jobs once
reserved for political science
graduates are being filled by econ-
omists, especially in the State De-
partment, Miss Webber explained.
Miss Webber also noted that.
sales fields are perennial leaders
for liberal arts graduates. She
cited upsurges in physics and
math, for women as well as men,
spurred by burgeoning missile in-
dustries.
Study Group,
Public Opinion
Change Code
By MYRNA ALPERT
A state study committee com-
pleted the first set of revisions on
the proposed new Teacher Cer-
tification Code recently.
These revisions are the result
of an extensive review of the opin-
ions of people of the state upon
the new code, State Superintend-
ent of Public Instruction Lynn M.
Bartlett, said.
A year ago the committee drew
up a tentative draft of the
changes it thought should be
adopted into the code. Thousands
of copies of this were sent out to
people all over the state who have
an interest in or concern for this
problem.
During the year committee
members held eight meetings
throughout the state to discover
the feelings of the people on this
matter. At the same time it re-
ceived suggestions through the
mail from those who were unable
to attend a meeting.
The revisions that were made
yesterday will again be sent out
around the state for the consider-
ation of the public. The committee
will use the results of this survey
to form its final draft. It hopes
to make a formal recommendation
to the Legislature by next year so
that the code can go into effect
by 1964.
The committee was formed sev-
eral years ago by Bartlett. It is
composed of members from every
kind of group that will be affect-
ed by the code.

Note Habits
of Animals
At Station
By JEFFREY K. CHASE
Plants and animals are studied
in their natural situations at the
University's Biological Station, a
permanent field station for in-
struction and research in zoology
and botany.
It is located on 8,900 acres of
land near Pellston, 270 miles north
of Ann Arbor.
The station, founded in 1909, is
the oldest and largest inland bio-
logical station in the United
States. Its success has made it the
prototype for similar stations,
Prof. Alfred Stockard of the zo-
ology department, director of the
station, says.
Ideal for Study
Its terrestrial composition con-
tains forestland - both decidu-
ous and coniferous-lakes, streams,
bogs, dunes, lowlands, rich up-
lands, and sandy uplands, which
support a multitude of species of
plants and animals, he explains.
This makes it ideal for extensive
study of land and water habita-
tion.
If this research could be under-
taken in a laboratory, the field
station would be unnecessary; the
work could be done here on the
University campus, Prof. Stockard
says.
Approximately 120 students,
some of them from foreign coun-
tries, attend classes at the station
every summer.
College Hours
The requirement for admission
is eight college hours of biology-
in zoology, botany, or a combina-
tion of both.
The faculty, numbering about
20. included professors from uni-
versities in both the United States
and Canada. They teach courses
and conduct research during the
eight-week summer session, the
field's most active season.
The facilities are open through-
out the year but are rarely used
in the winter months, since the
housing is riot designed for pro-
tection from the sub-zero temper-
atures. No courses are taught in
the fall, winter, or spring.
Self- Sufficient
The campus contains 143 build-
ings, 100 residential, 30 general
service, and 13 iaboratories for
closely controlled ecological stu-
dies. A post office, general store,
health service, library, and other
such buildings make this commu-
nity self-sufficient, Prof. Stockard
notes.
Open Positions
On Joint Judic
Petitioning is open now through
May 10 for Joint Judiciary Council
positions. There are five one-year
posts for men and women avail-
able for Sept., 1962. An unfilled,
one-semester woman's seat will be
filled from those who have already
petitioned.
Applications are available in the
office of Assistant Dean of Men
John Bingley on hte 2nd floor of
the SAB. Petitioners must be aca-
demically eligible and have 60
credit hours by June.

BUSINESS SERVICES
A FRIEND of mine hada score of 265
at the miniature bowling alley at the
SCHWABEN INN, 215 S. Ashley. He
also ate a great big Schwaben-Burg-
er. Meet your friends here for fun.
J20
Herb David GUITAR STUDIO. Instru-
ments and instruction. Guitars, lutes,
dulcimer, harpsichord, ude, banjo
etc. Ancient & modern, hand made
& commercial instruments. Repairs.
209 S. State. NO 5-8001. F6
HI-FI, PHONO TV, ana radio repair.
Clip this ad for free pickup and de-
livery. Campus Radio and TV, 325JE.
Hoover. NO 5-6644. .J24
BEFORE you buy a class ring, look at
the official Michigan ring. Burr-Pat-
terson and Auld Co. 1209 South Uni-
versity, NO 8-8887. J11
GUITAR AND BANJO INSTRUCTION
Beginner and advanced. Individ-
ual and small workshop groups.
Classical, folk, popular. Call 663-
6942. J20
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR

119 w. Washington

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone NO 2-4786
from 1:00 to 3:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, and Saturday 9:30 'til 11:30 A.M.

NO 2-1834

COEDS:

While you're having a
of coffee, why not have
DONE at the . . .

FREE cup
your HAIR

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .70 1.95 3.45
3 .85 2.40 4.20
4 1.00 2.85 4.95
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily
Phone NO 2-4786
PERSONAL
"HEY, where did you get that Pot?"
Bought it at the Art Auction, Wed-
nesday. May 2." F10
BLUE TEAM SAYS-Take stock. You
may be in the chips. F9
JANICE, how about seeing "Sounds of
Music" with me this weekend. I prom-
ise I'll be good. Gary. F8
TYPING-Quick and efficient. Pick up
and delivery. HA 9-9216. F12
DON'T FORGET MICHIFISH!
Show on May 4, 5, & 6. Women's Pool.
75c. 8:15, Fri. & Sat. 3:00 Sun. F19
WANTED: 2 or 3 man apt. for summer.
Call Andy or Gary at 2-5571. F17
PETITIONING for standing commit-
tees of SGC. Get petitions SAB. Turn
in before Friday, April 27. F12
DIAMONDS WHOLESALE-Save $100 to
$500. Robert Haack Diamond Import-
ers, First National Bldg., Suite 504,
by appointment only. NO 3-0653. P21
DISPOSING of my large library at pri-
vate sale. Rare opportunity for stu-
dents to build up a library of good
books at low prices. Special low
prices on sets of books. Showings at
617 Packard St. (near State) from 12
p.m. to 4 p.m. every day except Sun-
day. F16
FOR SALE
FOR SALE - 2 bdrm. mobile home.
Fence, awning, excellent cond. Only
$1500. Call GE 8-8221. Bll
MIMEOGRAPH machine, factory:recon-
ditioned. $40. Cali HU 3-5561. B13
CORRECTION-For Sale by Owner: be-
ing transferred June 1st. $17,500 ranch
for $16,000. Delightful three bedroom,
11 baths with colored fixtures, com-
plete kitchen built in including wash-
er and dryer. Patio with fenced yard,
attached garage, low low down pay-
ment. HU 3-5580. B15
NATIONAL Mobile Home, 1957, 35ft by
8 ft.. $1500. Call 3-7236 or 2-4770. B17
MUST SELL immediately, Nikon wt. Fl .4
Lens, 2%x3% Speed Graphic press
outfit, Argus Match-Matic outfit, new
never used. (cases, asst.) Steve 5-7671
(2-4449 at meals). B16

VOGUE BEAUTY SALON
300 S. Thayer in the concourse
of the Bell Tower
Now featuring the Hair-do of the
month-
THE CHERIE
Call NO 8-8354, also evenings by
appointment
Experienced Hair Stylists
" J24
MEET' YOUR FRIENDS
EAT GOOD FOOD
DRINK BEER &
ENJOY YOURSELF
at
Schwaben Inn
at 215 Ashley
While You're Here, Try a
SCH WABEN BURGER
--Largest in town
ONLY 50c
LIQUOR - BEER - WINE
J18
BARGAIN CORNER
ATTENTION ROTC
OFFICERS' SHOES
Army-Navy Oxfords -- $7.95
Socks 39c Shorts 69c
Military Supplies
SAM'S STORE
122 E. WASHINGTON WO
REAL ESTATE
STUDIO-800 sq. ft., Music, Dance, Re-
ducing, Ceramic, large assembly room
33x15, 4 smaller rooms, over Pretzel
Bell, 2-5 year lease. Will sell entire
building of 3 floors. Call Lansing, ED
7-9305. R6
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
FRIENDLY SERVICE IS OUR BUSINESS
Stop in now for brake work, engine
tune-up, battery and tire check-up.
South University & Forest

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Lady's gold wrist watch with
black ,cord band Tues.. April 17 on
campus between Univer. Museums
Building and Angell Hall. A
LOST-A plaid, red and charcoal black
Sak's sports coat, at Michigras. Sub-
stantial reward, Ken MacLean, NO
3-3392. A6
BIKES and SCOOTERS
ALMOST NEW English bike. Call Howie
3-4738, 5-6 p.m. Z8
1960 BSA Motorcycle, 250 c.c.. 4-speed,
excellent condition. Call Room 321
Chicago House, NO 2-4401. Z7
WHY WALK? Ride a Vespa! 1958 Vespa
motor scooter for sale. Call room 409
Chicago House, NO 2-4401. Z6
DO YOU FIND IT hard to get from
the IM Building to Frieze Hall .in
just 10 minutes? If you have this
trip or any other long one, solve
your problem with a bike from
BEAVER'S BIKE AND HARDWARE
605 Church NO 5-6607
Z17
SCOOTER: 1958,. Parilla, excellent run-
ning cond. Windshield & tools. $200.
Call after 4:00 p.m.hweekdays or Sat.
& Sun. all day. Z5
1958 CUSHMAN PACEMAKER, two-
speed, good condition, $135.00. NO 2-
2023. B6
SENIORS or Graduate male subjects to
participate in Thesis experiment.
Background from Engr., Business Ad.,
Psych, or Mathematics necessary. Call
NO 2-0918 after 6 p.m. H14
1961 LAMBRETTA 125 like new. Best
offer takes. NO 3-1783. N3
WANTED TO RENT
FOR FALL SEMESTER. Single room
with meals. Call Doug Brook. 2-4591,
ext. 401 Hayden. L12
WANTED TO RENT: Furnished house,
January to June, 1963. Ph.D. candidate
with three children would like to
rent 2-3 bedroom furnished house.
Willing to pay any reasonable rent.
NO 2-8171. L9
HELP WANTED
SENIOR OR GRADUATE male subjects
to participate in Thesis experiment.
Background in Engrg., Business Ad.,
Psych. or Mathematics necessary. Call
NO 2-0918 after 6 p.m. H14
WANTED
FEMALE VOCALIST
Pay-$200 per week
Pepertoire-Blues; Gay 20's, Rock
& Roll. Auditions-May 5-Eastern
Michigan Univ. Buell Hall at 1 P.M.
Joe Worzniak, manager of ELEC-
TRAS, 213 Buell. H2
STUDENTS-For outside work, fall or
part time, or at vacation time, apply
in person 224 South 1st. Hi
SENIORS or Grad, students (male) to
participate as pd. subjects in thesus.
Must have background in any of fol-
lowing: math, engr., psych., or Bus.
Ad. Call NO 2-0918 after 6 p.m. H15
WANTED-Man for meal job. Inquire
NO 3-8581 between 5 & 6. H13
TYPIST-RECEPTIONIST: four hours
daily Monday through Friday in Real
Estate and Building Office. Desir-
able talents include typing and cof-
fee brewing. Silky telephone voice
an asset, $125 per month.NO 3-9373,
Mr. Jabbour or Mrs. Brakney for
appointment. Hl
USED CARS
1960 HILLMAN Mint Convertible, radio,
heater, white walls. Excell. condition.
$1200. NO 5-5656. N4
'59 HUMBER-Product of Roots Motor
of England. NO 5-0267. C23
1959 SIMCA 4-dr. sedan. Good condition.
$450. Call NO 3-4747. N2
1960 ALFA ROMEO 2000 Sport Roadster
convertible, like new, real sharp, 7,000
mi., bargain. NO 3-7541, Ext. 783. N
NEED A CAR? We'll sell one chp. Call
Phil or Bill at 5-3595 or 5-9811. N21
MUST SELL ONE OF TWO: '57 Chevy
6-stick, 2-dr., R&H, $550. '57 MGA-
$950. NO 3-7966. N28
WHITE CONVERTIBLE-1957 Mercury.
Very sharp looking. Very good me-
chanically. NO 2-1069. N19
1956 MGA Blue, good condition. Call
NO 5-9556. N5
MISCELLANEOUS
THE NEW YORK TIMES delivered daily.
Student Newspaper Agency, PO Box
241, Ann Arbor, Michigan. M10
TRANSPORTATION
$51.00 gets you to Seattle, Wash. on
June 11th. Call NO 5-4024. G4

FOR RENT
SUMMER-3-room apt. Furnished, TV.
for 2 or 3. Liberty and Div., 8-7830.
c16
SUMMER-2-man mod, furnished apt.
Swmming pool. 1500 Pauline, NO
5-0300 after 7 p.m. 017
NEWLY FURNISHED, newly decorated
2-bedroom apartment for 3 girls. Un-
usually nice. One year lease. Available
June 1. NO 3-4435. c15
AIR CONDITIONED - Modern, attrac-
tively furnished apartment for sum-
mer for 4. Close to campus. NO 3-6867.
C10
NEWLY FURNISHED 3-room apartment
for summer. $125 plus electricity. 920
Catherine. NO 5-6242. C1
SUMMER-2-bedroom apartment, fu-
nished. Close to, campus, utilities. NO
5-9430. C14
FANTASTIC SUMMER OFFER-2-man
apartment, ultra modern, completely
furnished, TV, disposal, balcony. $90
per month. NO 5-4391 after 7. 012
SUMMER - Modern one-bedroom air-
conditioned apartment. Will sublet
with personal furnishings at unfur-
nished rate. Married couple or girls.
Only $105 month. AA Woods, 665-9603.
C13
BLOCK FROM CAMPUS
Newly furnished and redecorated apts.
for summer or fall. Girls preferred.
NO 3-7268. C18
FOREST AVENUE - Four room semi-
furnished apartment. Suitable for
four boys. Available June 1. Phone
NO 8-6931. C21
CAMPUS AREA-Large 4 rm. newly fur-
nished apt. Fireplace in 17 x 27 car-
peted living rm. All utilities includ-
ed. Laundry facilities. Suitable for 4
students. NO 5-9449. C20
CAMPUS AREA, 3 rm., clean furnished
apt. All utilities included. Laundry
facilities. NO 5-9449. 019
CAMPUS AREA. Newly furnished 2 rm.
apt. All utilities included. Laundry
facilities available. NO 5-9449. C18
SUMMER RENTAL. Spacious apt. for
four, fully furnished. 3 blocks from
campus. Call 3-1561, ext. 800. i7
ON CAMPUS
Men: Pleasant rooms available for
summer. Girls Pleasant rooms avail-
able for fall semester. NO 2-1443. C28
SUMMER SUBLET: Large, furn'd House
for 4. Reasonable. Call 2-4591, ext. 106
C. c1
NEAR CAMPUS
Furnished Two-Family-
3 Students per unit
June 15-June 15 lease.
NO 3-5098 c15
SUMMER-Men save money by living
ih Fraternity house. $60 for summer.
Call NO 2-7409. !08
SUMMER-Furn'd apt. for 3 or 4 with
parking. Close to campus. Call NO 2-.
7409. 07
SUMMER FUND apt. for 3 or 4 with
parking. Close to campus. Call NO 2-
7409. C6
SUMMER SUBLET furnished modern 3-
bedroom, 2 bath apt. for 5 or 6. Air
cond. S. Univ. Call 3-6325 after 5. 07
SUMMER-Modern apt. w/air cond. for
3 or 4. Near campus. $170/mo. NO 5-
0988. 8
SUMMER furn. apt, for 3, gd. loc. $300/
Sum. NO 3-8242. 024
NEAT PAD for Summer. 6 huge rms.
for 5-6 persons, close to campus and
2 drug stores, Call NO 5-4065 now. C26
VERY MODERN Apt.-Summer, furn. 2
bdrms. Near St. Joe Hosp. Cheap. NO
2-9596. For 3 or 4. C27
2% ROOM APT., perfect for couple, or
single person. Available in June.
665-0432 after 5. 027
AVAILABLE IN JUNE: One room effi-
ciency furnished apartment. Close to
campus. NO 3-4325. C20
SUMMER-Redecorated apt. for three.
1005 Packard. $145/mo. includes gar-
age. Call NO 2-9181. 05
ON CAMPUS. Now taking applications
for summer and fall furnished apart-
ments and parking. Call NO 2-1443.
012
FOR RENT-attractive fur. apt. for
girls or married couples. $95 to $135.
1 yr. lease beginning June or Sept.
NO 3-2800. C10
701 SOUTH FOREST
FURNISHED single rooms for men
available June 15. Singles or doubles
available for fall. Refrigerator, off
street parking, weekly cleaning, two
blocks from campus. Call Mr. or Mrs
Scott, NO 2-9301, 8 A.M. to 4 P.M. 017
DO YOU REALLY believe in integrated

housing? Do you want good housing
at moderate cost? Do you want a
beautiful new modern apartment? 1,
2, 3 bedroom apartments. New reduced
rents $72.00 to $92.00 per month. Call
Willow Village Apartments, HU 3-
1253. 06
CAMPUS-HOSPITAL ARFA-3-4 persons
furnished apartment on Walnut, NO
3-6357. -C5
FOR SUMMER SUBLET-Obser. apt. No.
1 mod. furn. 662-7904. C4
SUMMER APT.-2 bedroom, newly furn.
fully carpeted, garbage disposal. On
campus, near both hospitals. Parking
facilities. Call 665-0366. C2
SUMMER-3 bedroom furnished house.
Large yard, study, screen porch. NO
3-1102. Cl
SUMMER-Modern furnished apartment
for four, Close to campus-air condi-
tioned, parking. NO 2-5360. C14
1716 GEDDES!
Available June 15 for next year.
Three bedroom house, 2 baths, large
kitchen, free laundry facilities, and

"WHAT IS TRUTH?"
That faculty of mind which distinguishes between truth
and opinion is, says Plato, akin to the faculty of sight which
distinguishes between 'the reality and the shadow. It is to
further the understanding of the nature of this faculty and its
object, truth, that we invite both students and faculty members
of the University of Michigan to submit for consideration
essays on the subject of truth itself.,
Essays will be judged for clarity of thought, lucidity of
style, sincerity, and acuteness of perception. Prizes will be
awarded of $15.00 for the best essay and $5.00 each for the
second, third and fourth in merit.
Entries should be addressed to 626 Spring Street, Ann
Arbor, by 12 May 1962. Winners will be announced by May
19.

ECONOMIZE
at Christian
Enterprise

f Everything to furnish
apartment at a low cost.

an

s Bicycles
a Book Cases, Lamps, Desks
" Children's Furniture
" All our merchandise is either
second hand or has been reha-
bilitated and re-done.
o We have practically every-
thing for sale. Give us a call if
you're curious and would like to
save money on anyth'ng. Come
out and Bargain.
" STORE HOURS 8-6. Open 'til
9 p.m. on Fri., Sat., and Mon.
* 3640 CARPENTER ROAD (%
mile South of Packard St. inter-
section.)

........ ......... . .
r

FOR SALE-Full set of Leedy and Lud-
wig drums. A good buy at $95. Call
Jim Harrison, HU 2-3683 between 9-10
a.m. any day. X7

ANN ARBOR - NO 8-9629

B90

--

* Fill one of Trojan's GIANT clothes hampers
with all of your bulky winter clothes. The clothes
will be stored and insured in our Refrigerated
vault for the summer for only $4.95. Next fall
they will be returned cleaned, pressed, on hang-
ers and ready to wear. Naturally, the cost of clean-

Frosli Weekend
Saturday, May 5th
Dance-League Ballroom
8:30 P.M.

Avis~

...J

"..

Call NO 3-4156
Special weekend rates from 5 p.m.
Friday till 9 a.m. Monday . . .
$12.00n nun 8c a mile. Rates
include gas, oil, insurance.
514 E. WASHINGTON ST.

" TRUCKS AVAILABLE
G1
FOR RENT
MODERN Summer Apartment for rent.
Suitable for 4 people. 2 blocks from
campus & hospital. NO 3-2104. C12
FOR SUMMER RENT: One of the 30
best 3-men apts. in the city. Just 2
blocks from campus. Call NO 3-7819.
C4
SUMMER RENTAL for 2 or 3. 718 Mon-
roe across from Law school. 2 bdrm.
furn. NO 2-8832. C2
TO RENT: Large modern furn. apt. for
3. Laundry facilities, disposal and
parking lot. 2 blocks from campus.
Available June 1. NO 3-7106 after 7
p.m. C6
701 SOUTH FOREST
THREE ROOM furnished apartment for'
men. Available June 15 for summer
only. Off street parking, TV. two
blocks from campus. Call Mr. or Mrs.
Scott, NO 2-9301, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. C20

garage. Call 662-2960.

C3

COEDS ONLY!-New Bldg. New Danish
Mod. Furniture. Large Panelled living
room, 3 Bdrms. Carpeting throughout.
Near campus. June-Sept. Call 665-
7062 btwn. 5:00 and 7:30 P.M. 09
3 BEDROOM APT. for summer, 2 blocks
from campus. NO 3-1412. C3

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