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April 28, 1962 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-04-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

igArrillonAIV

_HE..CHI AN AL- -_- _ - I £U ~W

LUKLAY, APRIL 28, 1962

I

WHITE COLLAR WORKERS:
Ryder Tells of New Unionism

JOURNALISM:
Moore Addresses Convention

By HELENE SCHIFF
dAswhite collar workers are
pushed away from management
they are attracted to organiza-
tions such as unions that re-
establish their sense of importance
and individuality.
This was the opinion of Prof-
fessors Meyer S. Ryder and Fred
C. Munson of the Bureau of In-
dustrial Relationsas to why white
collar employees turn to unions.
The question of how many will
Name Cain
To Aid Udall
Prof. Stanley A. Cain, chairman
of the conservation department in
the natural} resources school, has
been named to a five-man ad-
visory board to aid Secretary of
the Interior Stewart Udall in form-
ulating wildlife management pro-
grams in public parks and forest
reserves.
The main area of consideration
for the board will be the problem
of animal overpopulation in many
of the public lands, Prof. Cain said
last night.
This problem, due mainly to
park policies which prohibit hunt-
ing, may become more pressing as
the department begins to pur-
chase more and more land, es-
pecially in the West.
However, the group also will
have to concern itself with aspects
such as the protection of under-
populated animal species and
safety relationships between hu-
man beings and the parks' an-
imals, Prof. Cain said.
$e will travel to Washington
tomorrow for the board's first
meeting with Udall. Prof. Cain also
serves on the National Parks Ad-
visory Board in addition to his
duties at the University.

turn to unions in the future is
hard to predict, they agreed.
Recent Survey
In a recent survey conducted by
Clark Caskey, program director
of the Bureau of Industrial Rela-
tions, managers of 85 Michigan
business firms were asked their
opinions on whether or not white
collar employees will turn to
unions in larger numbers in the
future than they have in the past.
A majority of the managers did
not believe white collar unions
would gain strength; the minority
were of the opinion that these
unions would grow.
The status of unions was re-
cently presented in the February
issue of Fortune Magazine, the
survey reports. The article states,
"if organized labor is to begir'
to hold its own, it must organize
the white collar group." This pre-
sents a dilemma for union leader-
ship.
Need New Terms
"If unions would talk to white
collar workers in their terms
rather than apply blue collar
worker's (men who work on as-
sembly lines) concepts then they

would probably be more success-
ful," Prof. Ryder said.
"Proportionally there are more
white collar workers than blue
collar workers in this country," he
noted. These employes have dif-
ferent standards than the factory
workers and as a consequence they
are harder to organize into unions.
However, where white, collar
workers are in larger enterprises
and find they do not have as
much individual status, they will
look to see what the blue collar
unions are doing. This may en-
courage their receptivity to or-
ganize themselves into unions, he
added.
Self-Help Phenomenon
"The concept of unionism is a
self-help phenomenon," Prof. Mun-
son said. It is inevitable that
white collar workers will realize
that by working in a group for
the things they want they will be
able to obtain them more ef-
ficiently and effectively.
White collar unions basically
have interests compared to blue
collar unions. They are more con-
cerned with the problem of super-
vision rather than the need for
increasing salaries.

WILLIAM HARVEY
... Ghana post

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Central Michigan University

(Continued from Page 1)
lecture audiences can be accom-
modated.}
Maximum utilization of class-
room space prevails with classes
beginning early and continuing
late in the day. Closed circuit tele-
vision courses service 1,800 stu-
dents.
Return to Campus
CMU research includesta 'fifth
year plan' under which teaching
majors extern in their fourth year,
returning to campus for comple-
tion of their studies and'a degree.
The program is designed to let

students get a real picture of
teaching along with a full year of
experience.
Through a field service program,
the school sends instructors
throughout a 38-county area and
offers a choice of subjects from
freshman English to bus driver
training.
Travel study programs, offering
credit, take students on 10-day bus
and train trips to centers of cul-
tural and political science.
Foust says CMU, with average
yearly costs to residents totaling
about $965, "is not striving to be-
come an elite school--just a good
one."
The university has requested an
operating budget of over $4.3 mil-
lion for the coming year. The re-
quested appropriation surpasses
the previous years, with the great-
est increase in the area of salar-
ies and wages.
CMU lost more faculty members
last year than ever before, and it
is especially concerned about sal-
ary needs at the professor and as-
sociate professor levels.
Poses Problem
An overload situation in classes
also poses a problem for the school.
Foust estimates that with a larg-
er operating budget the school
could admit another 350 students
without ,unduly overcrowding its
facilities.
Regardless of any increases, he
states, CMU needs a science build-
ing to replace a 1916 structure now
housing geography, chemistry, bi-
ology, physics, and military sci-
ence, and two classroom buildings
to replace temporary structures.

Ghana. To Get
''Legal Aid
By PHILIP SUTIN
Prof. William B. Harvey of the
Law School will spend the next
academic year in Ghana as Di-
rector of Legal Education and
Dean of the Law Faculty at Ghana
University.
While on leave from the Uni-
versity, Prof. Harvey will also sit
as an ex officio on the General
Legal Council of Ghana which
attempts to develop legal education
in the country and sets admission
and discipline standards for the
Ghana bar.
"I hope to lay down guiding
principles and techniques for legal
education which will grow after
I am gone," Prof. Harvey declared.
During his term he hopes to
develop a "good, working library
for research and teaching and a
set of teaching material particu-
larly useful to Ghana." He ex-
plained that legal teaching is pri-
marily by lecture and that there
is little textual and case study
suitable for Ghana:
"Ideally, this should be a long
term job. However, the country
does not have the reservoir of
trained manpower," he said.
Prof. Harvey has been interested
in Ghanian legal affairs and will
write a book on the evolution of
Ghanian legal institutions.
"I plan to study these institu-
tions as social indices to see the
effects society has on the law
and legal institutions on society,"
he explained.

By MICHAEL ZWEIG
"We can expect big changes in
journalism in the future due to
the communications revolution,"
Leslie Moore, executive editor of
the Worcester (Mass.) Telegram
and Gazette said yesterday in an
address to the Michigan Inter-
scholastic Press Association con-
vention.
Speaking to over 800 Michigan
high school journalists, Moore
stressed the great changes in
American journalism in the past
three decades. "The press is now
more comprehensive, consciencious
and constructive than ever. Today
more news goes farther and faster
than ever before," he said.
We are in the midst of a com-
munications revolution which will
continue to affect journalists and
further change the processes and
objectives of newspaper reporting,
Moore told the young audience.
Three Aspects
Discussing "Tomorrow's Jour-
nalist," Moore analyzed the effect
of the communications revolution
on three aspects of journalism:
the structure and organization of
the newspaper, the emphasis of
news coverage and the motivation
for going into journalism.
Modernization of newspaper of-
fices makes more and more news
available. This excess of news will
call for "a new degree of expert-
ness in news judgement needed
from editors," Moore said.
As information becomes more
readily available, newspapers will
become region-oriented rather
than locally oriented, Moore said.
WSU To Sponsor
Arts Conference

"Newspaper ownership will not
change, however. A newspaper
must be privately owned and di-
rected if it is to be free from
political control. The communica-
tions revolution should not change
the ownership," Moore asserted.
Music Groups
To Host Talks
The Midwest Chapters of the
American Music Musicology So-
ciety and the Music Library As-
sociation will meet today at the
University for a series of lectures.
"The Study of Music as Human
Behavior," "The Chromatic Ap-
poggiatura in the Harmonic Tex-
ture," and "The Cantata 'San-
tissimo Natale' by Stradella" will
be presented at 9:30 a.m. in Lane
Hall.
In the afternoon session at Lane
Hall, speakers will discuss "Jaun de
Anchieta and the Beginnings of
Spanish Renaissance Style," "An-
tonio de Cabezon's Magnificat
Versets and Hymn Settings Viewed
as a Fundamentum," "Some Re-
marks about the Real. Answer in
Bach's Fugues," and Serial Tech-
nique Two Hundred Years Before
Schonberg."
Speakers will present "Ars Nova,
a Re-definition," "P unto intenso
contra remisso," "Classicism and
Romanticism in Thirteenth-Cen-
tury Music," and "The Concertos
of Padre Martini," at 10:30 a.m.
in Lane Hall.
There will be a recital featuring
Richard Miller, tenor, at 4:15 p.m.
in Aud. A.

<t

The emphasis in future journal-
ism will be the "why" of events,
Moore predicted.
Inform People
The future journalist will, "as
always, be dedicated to the task of
helping people to be informed of
the life around them so that these
people will better be able to live
and understand," Moore explained.
At the convention, the MIPA
gave awards to a Detroit high
school student and four high
school publications advisers.
Barbara Wilson, a student at
MacKenzie High School, won the
John Lewis and Clara -Moffatt
Brumm Memorial Scholarship,
which is awarded annually to a
superior student planning to enter
journalism at the University.
Mary Glenn Sanderson, adviser
of the Port Huron High School
newspaper, and Lucy Dillon, ad-
viser of the Flint Northern High
School paper, won Golden Pen
Awards for being outstanding ad-
visers of scholastic journalism.
Citations of merit went to ad-
visers Dorothy Rich of Jackson
High School and Lawrence Niblett
of Cooley High School in Detroit.
ISA, Clubs Plan
WUTS Smorgasbord
The International Student As-
sociation and the Nationality Clubs
are sponsoring an International
Smorgasbord from 5:30 to 8 p.m.
Sunday at the Newman Club. Pro-
fits from the event will be donated
to the World University Service,
an organization dedicated to help-
ing students around the world.

LAST DAY
"HELD
OVER"
Phi Sigma Sigma
A E Pi
At
Michigras
Read and. Use
Daily Classifieds
BUD~GET-
PRwiICED!I
2-and
.,. 4-drawer
STEEL
FILE
and
$34.25
MORRI LL'S
314 S. State St. 5-9141
While they last

4

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"The Creative Arts in an Age of
Anxiety,". the fifth annual Mc-
Gregor Detroit Adventure Confer-
ence, will be held this weekend at
the Community Art Aud. at Wayne
State University. "Types of Poetry
-1962," with Donald Hall of the
English department, will be pre-
sented at 3 p.m. today. W. D.
Snodgrass of Wayne will also par-
ticipate.
"Anxiety and the Creative Pro-
cess," featuring Henri M. Peyre of
Yale University will speak at 8:30
p.m. tonight. "The Future of the
Creative Arts in Detroit" will be
discussed tomorrow at 2:00 p.m.
Dr. William E. Stirton, chairman
of the Michigan Cultural Commis-
sion, will take part in this discus-
sion.

NDING DIAL
)NIGHT NO 2-6264
fize~an FR
Vidance
Starting Sunday
TROY DONAHUE ANGIE DICKINSON
ROSSANO BRAZZI
"LOVERS MUST LEARN"
Domestic Release Title: "ROME ADVENTURE"

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OUR CONSTITUTION WORKS,
doesn't it? Law is better than
Anarchy, isn't it?? Shall we
overkill each other or shall we
work out rules for MUTUAL
SURVIVAL?
Write World Constitution
2310 No 15th Ave.,
Phoenix 7, Ariz.

WDIANO 8-6416.
2nd Big Week!
"A MEMORABLE
EXPERIENCE!"
-Cook, World-Telegram
"ENGROSSING,
ABSORBING
DRAMA!"
-Zunser, Cue
"HIGHLY
RECOMMENDED!"
-Masters, Daily News
"GENERATES
DRAMATIC
POWER!"
-Beckley, Herald-Tribune
- "Sofia
entertain-
ment!"
IARIW SCHEUt. STUARTII1TA3
and ROD STEIGER as Do c IIaII1,
KConttinontal Distribetmg. lac. Remus
Next
"View From The Bridge"
lII l T
DIAL NO 5-6290
SNEAK
PREVUE
TONIGHT
Between Shows-9-10 P.M.
-- HELD OVER|-

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(Across from the Falcon Bar)

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Biggest Pizza Parlor'

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Following in the tradition of
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A FREE PIZZA (1.40) on your birthday.
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