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April 20, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-04-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY,

::a a:. a s c v a v A1t B aTTYs .

LANCZOS TALK:
Einstein's Theories
Seen as Philosophy

DEFENDS RESEARCH:
'U' Dean Rebuts AMA
In Grant Controversy

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
at
SABBATH SERVICE
Tonight at 7:30
"Poetry and Prose of PASSOVER"
Presentation by Marvin Diskin
Director, Theatre Hillel
Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel 1429 Hill t.

By DONNA ROBINSON
Albert Einstein was not a sci-
entific specialist-he was essen-
tially a philosopher, Prof. Corne-
lius Lanczos said yesterday.
"Other scientists looked only at
parts, but Einstein, viewing the
universe as an integrated whole,
recognized the operation of fun-
damental principles."
Prof. Lanczos, of the Dublin In-
stitute for Advanced Studies, con-
cluded a series of six Institute of
Science and. Technology lectures
on Einstein's place in the history
of physics with a summary of

Einstein's accomplishments and
their possible future impact.
Newton Accepted
The physical theories of Isaac
Newton's universe seemed to have
everything explained, and they
were almost universally accepted
for two hundred years.
But Albert Einstein challenged
them. His theories demolished the
Newtonian concept of absolute
time and space. Newton's gravita-
tion was to Einstein a useful but1
actually unnecessary concept, Prof.
Lanczos said.
To replace Newton's universe,
Einstein createq one of his own:

one where time and space were
not absolute but relative, where
matter was nothing more than a
curved portion of space, where the
forces of gravity did not really
exist as such.
More Complex
It was a much more complicat-
ed universe than Newton's and it
ended the era when scientific con-
cepts could be understood in terms
of little mental pictures.
In return for this loss of sim-
plicity, science gained through
Einstein's theories a "tremendous
advance in unity. Einstein mirror-
ed the cosmic spirit which mani-
fests itself in physical occur-
rences," Prof. Lanczos said.
The change from Newton's uni-
verse to Einstein's brought a shift
in emphasis from merely observing
and describing physical phenome-
na to attempts to explain the ob-
served universe.
Quantum Reverses
The modern quantum theory
has since reversed this emphasis,
and also seeks to deny Einstein's
unity in favor of a universe gov-
erned by chance.
But the theory of relativity and
the universe it created are far
from overthrown. And even if they
ever were discarded, there are cer-
tain concepts embodied in them
which we can never give up, Prof.
Lanczos emphasized.

VERSATILITY PLUS-Folk artist Jesse Fuller will kick off the
annual Folk Music Festival tonight with his renowned one-man
band performance. Fuller wields six different instruments simul-
taneously for a unique music style.
'FolkMusic
Scheduled for Weekend

By JUDITH BLEIER
Charges in an editorial in the
current American Medical Associa-
tion Journal that the unwise al-
location of grant money represents
"a new blight on-medical research"
brought a rebuttal yesterday from
C. J. Tupper, associate dean of
the Medical School.
"At no time in the history of
this planet has so much money
been spent on medical research as
in the last few years," the editorial
says.
"Far too few people have realiz-
ed, however, that the stepped up
efficiency with which these sums
are raised does not necessarily
mean that they are equally ef-
ficiently spent. Moreover, it is
probable that inadequate num-
bers of research workers are bene-
fiting by the grants and that huge.
sums of money are spent on doubt-
ful, artificially blown-up, occa-
sionally ridiculous projects."
Tupper objected, saying, "Here
at the University I am impressed
by the careful review that is made
of all grant applications and by
the evaluation which takes place
even after the applications have
been granted."
The confidence of the govern-
ment in the University's ability
to manage grant funds is evidenc-

ed by the recent awarding of
general, rather than specific,
grants to the medical, dental and
public health schools, he said.
"It is clear to medical educators
that research must be kept in its
proper respect in regard to teach-
ing and patient care," he noted.
"The Medical School recognizes
its obligation to maintain an ef-
fective balance between these
areas."
Hunt To Deliver
Psychology Talk
Prof. J. McV. Hunt of the Uni-
versity of Illinois will speak on
"Withdrawal and Approach in In-
trinsic Motivation" at 4:15 p.m.
today in Aud. B. A coffee hour will
be held at 3:45 p.m. in Rm. 3417
Mason Hall.
ORI ENTATION
LEADERS?
Sign up now
UNION-LEAGUE

MICHIGRAS
___ON SALE NOW
DIAG, ENGINE ARCH,
UNION STEPS

^'1
..

PROF. CORNELIUS LANCZOS
. ends lecture series
To Show Jensen
Landscape Exhibit
The landscape architecture of
the late Jens Jensen will be pre-
sented in an exhibition of photo-
graphs, models, and original draw-
ing plans until May 14 in Alumni
Memorial Hall..

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DIAL NO 2-6264
Today Through Saturday

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Folk musicians from across the
nation will pick, strum and sing
this weekend at the second spring
Folk Music Festival sponsored by
the Folklore Society.
Highlighting the scheduled con-
certs will be popular folk artists
Jesse Fuller and Bob Dylan. Ful-
ler will present his concert at 8
p.m. today in the Union Ballroom
and Dylan is scheduled to sing atj
2 p.m. Sunday, also in the Union
Ballroom.
A Hootenanny is scheduled for
8:30 p.m. tomorrow in Trueblood
Aud. Fuller and Dylan will join
former University students Perry
Lederman and Mike Sherker, Marc
Silber, '63, and folk musicians from
other colleges. A hootenanny is a'
folk music program, featuring sev-
eral entertainers and spontaneous
audience participation.
Workshops in guitar and banjo
are scheduled for 10:30 a.m. to-
morrow on the third floor, SAB.
Prof. I. H. Walton, of the engineer-
ing English department, will de-
liver a lecture on "Collecting Folk
Music" at 2 p.m. in the third floor
conference room of the Union.
In addition to the concerts, lec-
ture and workshops there will be
a meeting at 3 p.m. tomorrow in
3529 SAB to establish a National
Folk Music Society, Howard Ab-
rams, '63, head of the local Folk-
lore Society says.
Detroit Choirs
Plan Concert
Choirs of four Detroit churches
will participate in a concert of
Byzantine Choral Music at 8:15
p.m. today in Hill Aud.
The concert is unique in that
it will be the first area combined
concert of Orthodox choirs. Repre-
sented will be Russian, Greek, Ser-
bian, and Syrian choirs. Each will
sing Orthodox hymns and chants-
many of which date to the tenth
century A.D. - in their respective
national languages.
The choirs will sing both a Ca-
pella and accompanied by the
Frieze Memorial Organ. Twenty-
five hymns will be presented in all.,
Schedule Testing
For Peace Corps
The Peace Corps qualification
examination will be held at 8:30
a.m. tomorrow in the Civil Serv-
ice Room of the Main Street Post
Office. Students who want to take
this exam and have not already
sent an application to Washington,
may pick up an application in Rm.
3200 of the SAB and bring the
completed form with them to the
test.

The purpose of a national agen-
cy would be to strengthen ties be-
tween folk groups; promote folk
music by public talks, concerts and
workshops; stimulate community
and school services with library
and music department donations,
and organize folk societies and
benefit concerts.
Allen Arues
Peace Issue
By RONALD WILTON
A Diag crowd that numbered up
to 75 people at time yesterday
argued problems of peace s with
Peter Allen of Oberlin College,
regional secretary of the Student
Peace Union.
At the Voice political party-
sponsored forum, Allen character-
ized the SPU program as one
which "stresses American initia-
tives and not junking all our
armaments immediately. We can
take steps which will not destroy
our nuclear stockpiles but which
will relieve some world tension.
"We want the United States to
take a different direction instead
of trying to get ahead again by
resuming nuclear testing. This
only makes the Russians test again
because they want to catch up."
He said that while it was not
the policy of this nation to strike
first, it is our policy to."develop
the ability to strike first; and we
can't blame the Russians for
thinking that we will."
He cited the vulnerable missile
bases located around the rim of
the Soviet Union and said that
"since these are only good for
first-strike capability we could
take the iniative and give them
up without destroying our deter-
rent."
Answering a person from the
crowd asking "What are you push-
ing?" Allen said SPU desired "a
commitment to a foreign policy
that is not based on military
means. We are not interested in
getting into the question of 'better
Red than dead.'"
He noted that there were basic
differences .of opinion both within
this country and between us and
our allies, but that "we all agree
we will ignore these differences
while there is the threat of the
Soviet Union. However, there is
a bigger threat right now: the
threat of nuclear w"ar'
Rockefeller
To Lecture

STARTS
TODAY

I

IT'S A BLUE RIBBON BONANZA
OFJOYAND TUNE-FILLED MAGIC
From the men who gave you "Oklahoma,""South Pacific,
"The Sound Of Music," "The King And I"I

A ill 10 Itunu E¢mnil

Dial NO 8-6416
STARTING TONIGHT

DIAL
NO 5-6290

SUNDAY

JAMES STEWART

JOHN WAYNE

in
"The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance"

MARIA SCHELL/STUART WHITMAN ri"M i Wonderfulwith
TE MARK" in CinemaScopeRICHAR
and ROD STEIGER 4 D1AR
as Doc McNally fued hi
a RAYMOND STROSS UfIIE newest
SY BUCHIMAN Producto* InIi melodies n
wes.dbGUY GREEN newss
0+4rtutnq~ nt, ettattP! A'r ">MIIA LF BRA = I~T JOSE FERRER IC~AR D BR MEN N rz 0o Eo tV
OSCAR UAMMERSTEIN It /SONYA LEVIEN / PAUL GREEN/ ALFRED NEWMAN
TONIGHT at 7 and 9 Saturday and Sunday at 7 and9
SUNSET BOULEVARD Fellini's I VITELLONI
Gloria Swanson, William Holden, Franco Fabrizi, Albert Sordi
Erich von Stroheim (Earlier adventures of the hero of La Dolce Vita)
Short: The Ugly Duckling (Disney) Short: Roger van der Weyden
ALL SHOWS 50c at the ARCHITECTURE.AUDITORIUM

"At Both Stores"
SALE
Folk Music and Jazz
ALL Labels
reg. 3.98 .. . NOW 2.99
reg. 4.98 ... NOW 3.59
reg. 5.98 .. . NOW 3.99

..-

FOLK
FESTIVAL
JESSE FULLER is unparalleled
as an entertainer, has what
modern jazz musicians call soul.
-Ralph Gleason
(BOB) DYLAN is the brightest
young singer on the folk hori-
zon. -Cue

Laurance S. Rockefeller, chair-
man of the National Outdoor Rec-
reation Resources Review Com-
mission, wal speak at the School
of Natural Resources convocation
at 8:30 p.m. today in Rackham
Amphitheatre.
His speech, "The Future of Out-
door Recreation," will highlight
the two-day convocation. An add-
ed attraction will be open house
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. today and
tomorrow at the recently expanded
and remodeled natural resources
school facilities in the former
West Medical Bldg.

ALSO :

SAVE 1/3

RCA VICTOR
MERCURY
CAPITAL
ANGEL
WESTM INSTER
VOX BOXES, 1.98 per

II

record

Faculty and Teaching Fellows
TAKE NOTE
Michigan Union presents
for your children
A TOUR OF
rw~l i IWu u E m U A ^I

DIAMOND NEEDLES
5.95

I

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