100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 05, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THEMICHIGANDAILY

Rogue Explains Child Study

Russian Tells Students
Soviets Want To Disarm

To: Vacation-Bound
Student
From: McCoy's
Cord &Photo
Subject: That
Dirty Typewriter

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
9dbk9edt1&d

i

eventually get around to family
planning.
To Evaliate Methods
An evaluation will be made after
six weeks to find out the effect of
the introduction of this informa-
tion on people who only read the
pamphlets, those' who were just
part of discussion groups, those
who just talked about this matter
with neighbors, and those who
were exposed to any combination
of these methods.
Prof. Bogue listed the basic
principles that must be understood
by people who are organizing a
family planning program. These
include such things as the fact
that people will not accept a new
idea until it is endorsed by a per-
son or agency they trust, the mes-
sage must be specific, well organ-
ized, and the objectives should be
listed.
Inconveniences
The counselor must admit that
there are some disadvantages and
inconveniences to birth control
and then neutralize them. This
way the people will not be too dis-
couraged if things go wrong in the
beginning.
The idea will be more readily
adopted if it comes from several
sources and if it is reinforced by
other social programs.
"Surveys on fertility rates have
been conducted throughout the
world during the past 15 years
which have shown certain cross
cultural trends, but cannot yet be
considered'scientific fact," Prof.
Bogue explained.
Some of these generalizations
are: on the average one half of
all children over the third one in
the family are not wanted; people
with high fertility have little mor-
al or religious resistance to birth
control; men are no less favorable
to small families than women, and
people say that they would like to
learn more about family planning.

By RICHARD KRAUT
The Soviet Union is truly in-
terested in disarmament but is
afraid of more than adequate in-
spection systems,, Sergy Lebedev,
a Russian student studying law at
the University, explained Satur-
day.
Lebedev answered questions pos-
ed by residents of South Quad-
rangle.
The questions touched on dis-
armament, Marxist doctrine, Com-
munist intentions in the world to-
Council Holds
First Hearing
on Sigma Nu
(Continued from Page 1)
The waivers which have been
granted to other chapters in the
past grant local autonomy to chap-
ters in the area of membership
selection, Dr. Smock explained.
He cited the example of the Sig-
ma Nu chapter at the University
of Wisconsin as an example of a
deadline being set allowing too
short a time, so that although the
national granted a waiver, the
group was not able to comply in
time to retain its recognition.
The receivership which was
placed on the group effective
March 20, was removed so that
the hearing could be handled at
the local level.
There is a possibility that the
possible investigations of the group
will result in some form of control
being placed on it, either through
a board of advisors or a receiver-
ship similar to the one just with-
drawn until the chapter could solve
some of its academic and other
problems.

day, life inside Russia and the le-
gal system of the Soviet Union.
Soviet Plans
Lebedev brought out the fact
that the Soviet plan for disarma
ment as presented at the Geneva
Conference includes a plan with
"adjusted inspection for -each. of
three stages of disarmament."
However, the United States in-
sists upon a much greater degree
of inspection. This arouses fears
that inspection is likely to be used
for "espionage purposes" rather
than those of disarmament.
Defends Test Action
One questioner asked why the
Soviet Union broke the test mor-
atorium. Lebedev replied that Ei-
sonhower denounced the morator-
ium in December, 1959, and "this
action, apart from the well known
reasons which forced the USSR to
resume tests, deprives the United
States of any right to reproach
the Soviet Union." The Russian
law student also wondered why
the United States was going to
start its own test series soon.
Marxism is not dogmatic, Leb-
edev said when asked whether or
not he believed in the dialectic.
It has developed a great deal and
will continue to develop.
Convinced of Victory
In fact, Communists no longer
believe that violent overthrow of
the government is necessary "un-
der any circumstances and in all
countries." Although they are
"convinced of the final victory of
Communism over the world," they
say it will be accomplished with
the consent of the people.
Internally, the Soviet Union is
trying to strike a balance between
centralization and decentraliza-
tion. If possible, problems are al-
lowed to be solved on the local lev-
el, Lebedev explained.
No Bomb Shelters
In addition, he said that he has
neither seen nor heard of bomb
shelters in Russia.
The legal system in the Soviet
Union is codified, Lebedev pointed
out. This contrasts with the Amer-
ican system of case-made law. And
case-made law is more difficult to
learn than codified law, Lebedev
commented.

Dear

(fill in your name)

Friday, April 20
JESSE FULLER
Concert
Union Ballroom

It may not have occurred to
you, but while you're frolicking
in the sun, we could be cleaning
the cobwebs (so to speak) out
of your typewriter. Of course if
you're taking it with you for
ballast don't read any further.
However, chances are excellent
that one of your profs. will ask
for a few thousand words of un-
dying prose before June. In
which case you will be tickled
that you took advantage of
our VACATION TYPEWRITER
CLEANING SPECIAL, regularly
$15.40 --- only $11.95 during
Spring Vacation.
All work guaranteed by Les-.
lie Office Equipment.
McCOY'S j
CARD & PHOTO
723 N. UNIVERSITY,
NO 3-4514

8:30 P.M.

90C

Saturday, April 21
WORKSHOP
and LECTURE
10:30 A.M. S.A.B.
HOOTENANNY
Trupblood Aud.
8:30 P.M. $1.50$2

11

Sunday, April 22

BOB" DILLON
Union Ballroom

2:00P.M.

90C

TICKETS ON SALE AT DISC SHOP, UNION DESK, DOOR
mm mm #mm "K'1 m S mS mm \g~ m o #

ll

Use Daily Classifieds

G LBERT AND SULLIVAN
IS NOW PRESENTING

"PATIENCE"

Dorr Cites Effects of Glacial Retreat

or
B UNTHORNES BRIDE'

The Diag is underlain by out-
wash, and one can see the layer-
ing in construction excavations
such as the one for the Astron-
omy-Physics Bldg.
Girls living on the Hill are fa-
miliar with another of the campus'
glacial features, Prof. Dorr said.
In walking down from the Hill by
the Women's Athletic Bldg. and
up North University to campus,
they cross a channel that once
carried glacial meltwater.
Steep Mound
Part of north campus lies on
still another kind of glacial de-
posit.-a kame. This is a relatively
steep-sided, stratified mound of
material that collected in a crevice
on the flacial front and was left
behind when the glacier melted,
The Fort Wayne moraine is one
of the series of moraines in the
Michigan area that loop around
the southern end and along the
shoreline of Lake Michigan, across
the top of the lower peninsula,
DIAL NO 5-6290'

i

and down
Huron on
state.

the shoreline of Lake
the other side of the

i

Pattern Explained
The glacier left this pattern of
morainal loops because the ice
was thicker in the basins of the
Great Lakes and melted more
slowly there than in the central
part of the state, Prof. Dorr ex-
plained.
Ann Arbor has a rather interest-
ing position in relation to the
pattern of moraines left by the
retreating glacier, -he said. The
city lies at the point where the
Fort Wayne moraine merges with
the two ridges of the Defiance
moraine. It is on the boundary
between the moraines on the
northwest and the glacial lake
plain on the southeast toward De-
troit.
Drivers from Detroit to Ann
Arbor will notice the change from
the relatively flat lake plain to
the more hilly moraine.
DIAL NO 8-6416
ENDING TONIGHT
AUDREY
HEPBURN
--AND-,
NANCYKWAN
WILLIAM HOLDEN
n THE"WO D Of
SUZI
OfiG
Oe Coplt Soat7PM
FRIDAY
"THE KING AND I"
AND
"CAROUSEL"

it

I

i

April 5 and 6
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre... 9:00 P.M.
Tickets avalableat. Box Office, April 5 &'6
Thursday, $1.50; Friday, $1.75

I

I

I-

_1

1

KE

D

T E

ENDING TONIGHT
HONORABLE
SCREEN SMASH!

with MICHIGRAS

.,

THE COLLEGE WEEKEND

I

.THE B IGGEST

ROSALIND AEC
JSSELL&GUINt4ESS
AjoRiyof ONE
" FRIDAY
WALT DISNEY'S
//P/NOCH H 10"/

ALL-CAMPUS EVENT OF

I

ITS KIND

... ANYWHERE

I

I

I

Dial {1!1111i l "SPLENDOR IN THE GRASS"
2-2 64 1111111111Shown at
qu-6264 II 1:00 - 5:10 and 9:35
Doors open "111 nill unI'FANNY" Shown at
12:45 111 I 11 88 113:00 and 7:25
2 OF THE YEAR'S TOP PRIZE
PICTURES IN ONE GIANT SHOW!
NOMINATED ACADEMY '
AWARD "BEST ACTRESS"
NATALIE WOOD
THE ;A
~tPAT HINGLE AUDREY CHRISTIE
WARNDNTROEUCNG
WARREN BEATTY

Coming
April 27

I

II

Back to Top

© 2019 Regents of the University of Michigan