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April 01, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Re publican Incumbents
Favored in City Election
(Continued from Page 1)

Marion LeRoy Burton, 1920-1925

order to provide services that will
be necessary. He urged an im-
mediate start on a master plan
and continued efforts to attract
new industry to the city.
Fourth Ward
Fourth Ward Republican Wen-

News Coverage W ernette -
"In this way, we have been able
to facilitate faster, more complete e s
news coverage for our listeners," Business School
he continued.
"The service also sponsors as u
many as 200 to 250 'remote broad-
casts,' or those produced outside of
our own studios, per year, in an Prof. J. Philip Wernette of the
effort to present all things of im- business administration school
port that happen on campus and Thursday proposed a new curricu-
to share Ann Arbor's cultural lum, for business education at a
wealth with people throughout the dedication ceremony at the Uni-
state." versity of Texas.
Such remote broadcasts include 'His curriculum was based upon
basketball, football and hockey eight core courses "which con-
games, concerts, lectures, confer- tribute to the attainment of its
ences and interviews with profes-, objectives." The eight included
sors-features only the University business organization and opera-
can offer. They may originate live tion, society government and busi-
from Aud. A, Lydia Mendelssohn ness, human relations, communi-
Theatre, Rackham and Hill Auds. cations, problem analysis and ex-
Lane Hall, Yost Fieldhouse and ecutive adminstration.
Michigan Stadium or may be taped These would provide "a broad
MiohianStoadimrm be understanding of the nature of
business and its role in our society,
enlarge the student's competence
a ein the basic qualities that are
epu in business management
On Future o f 'U' and provide a life-long stimulus to
[' 11 self-propelled personal improve-
ment," Prof. Wernette said. -
Regent Donald M. Thurber, As- "Some of the courses could use
sistant Dean Charles Lehmann of declaratory test materials. Other
the educational school-and Robert courses might use a combination
C. Lusk of the Automobile Manu- of such materials plus cases or
facturers Association will discuss problems which are designed to
"The Future of the University of give the student practice in han-
Michigan" at 2:30 p.m. today in dling business activities, thereby
the Union Ballroom. The program giving him a kind of vicarious
is sponsored by Challenge, practical experience," he said.
PROGRAM NOTES:-
Frost To Give Works
At ReadingTomorrow
Robert Frost will read from his
works in a presentation by the form works by Ulysses Kay and
Michigan Union's cultural affairs Anton Webern at 8:30 p.m. April
committee at 8:30 p.m., tomorrow, 2 in Rackham Lecture Hall.
in Hill Aud. The concluding concert in the
Frost was presented a special Festival will be a faculty concert
medal on his 88th birthday by of solo and chamber music at 8:30
President John F. Kennedy at the p.m. April 3 in Rackham Lecture
Hall.
Discussion.. .
A discussion of "contemporary
music compositions by Philip P.
. k 4r Jarnack; guest composer, and a
panel of student composers will
be given at 4:15 p.m. April 3 in
Rackharn Amph.
Piano Recital
Ruth Biggerstaff, '62SM, plan-
ist, will give a public degree re-
cital at 8:30 p.m. April 4 in Lane
Hall Aud. She will play works by
Beethoven, David Bates, Schu-
mann, and Robert Palmer.
Organ Recital...
Matt Halonen, '63M, organist,
will present a concert at 8:30 p.m.
April 5 in Hill Aud. He will play
works by Giovanni Gabriolo, Bach,
Cesar Franck, and Leslie Bassett.
ROBERT FROST Personal Guilt'.. ..
. . , to read works A lecture, "Personal Guilt, by
Prof. Hobart Mowrer, of the psy-
White House. The medal was vot- chology department, will be spon-
ed by Congress for his contribu- sored by the Office of Religious
tions to arts and letters. Affairs at 4:15 p.m. in Aud. A.

dell Hulcher urges encouragement
of the work of the Human Rela-
tions Commission, encouragement
of the Research Park and the city-
wide reassessment program cur-
rently under way.
Arthur H. Simsar, his opponent,
asked passage of new zoning regu-
lations to protect thy: investments
of property owners, an expanded
parks and recreation program and
an increase in the size of the
police and fire departments.
Fifth Ward
Fifth Ward Republican Laird
asked purchase of the Huron River
shore properties, the continuation
of "good relations" between the
University and the city and the
school system and the city and
increased salaries for city em-
ployees. This is also the district
in which the Northbelt controversy
figures strongly with Laird asking
a change in the plans for the con-
struction of the road through the
district.
Campaigning against Laird, Hoff
backs a fire station in his district,
an improved zoning ordinance, a
better park system and a city
council resolution to pressure the
State Highway Department into
changing its plans.

(Continued from Page 1)
Icelandic explorer Vilhajalmar
Stefansson. He spoke in his
beautifully clear and resonant
voice and sat down to hear the
lecture.
It was then he suffered a
serious heart attack and was
hustled to University Hospital.
The staff there saved his life
and he returned home to con-
valesce.
However he did not get up
again, and he hung on the
brink of death for several
months. Suddenly, early on the
morning of Feb. 18, 1925, he
died quietly in his sleep.
-* * *
THE DAILY relates that
President "Burton's death came
quietly and at an unexpected
moment. The night nurse had
taken the patient's pulse and
finding it continuing to show
satisfactory strength, turned
from the bedside for a moment.
Scarcely had she turned away
when a deep sigh from the bed
caused her to call hurriedly to
the doctor in attendance.
"By the time-only a few
seconds-he reached President,
Burton's side, the heart had
ceased to beat, and that stal-
wart form, so wrecked and
emaciated by the harrowing ill-

ness, lay still at last, peaceful
in its release from pain."
The State of Michigan lapsed
into profound shock. Gov. Alex-
ander Groesbeck rose from his
sickbed to hurry to Ann Arbor.
Thousands poured into the
campus for the funeral four
days later.
President Burton lay in state
in Alumni Memorial Hall. The
Daily issued a glossy photo-
graph free with each paper, be-
cause the requests for it were
so great.
The entire faculty and ad-
ministration turned out for the
procession in caps and gowns,
proceeding on foot behind the
casket.
Students lined the streets all
the way from President Bur-

ton's home to Forest Lawn
Cemetary, and student pall-
bearers carried the casket the
entire way.
It had been raining early in
the day, but it cleared a bit
for the long journey to Forest
Lawn. The whole route was
thronged with people, standing
solemnly as President Burton
was laid to rest.
The tributes had been many.
The Regents even requested R.
A. Dolph to make a death mask
of him, which was later used in
making a bronze bust.
The University had to go on
without the man who had given
his life hoping it would become
the greatest university of all.

*1

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MODERN MEXICAN
Paintings, drawings & prints
I-
opening today 3-6 P.m.
%Z7mwJ~e a11
201 NICKELS ARCADE NO 3-091$

The International Center and
The Venezuelan Student Association
present
THE ORFEON UNIVERSITARIO CHOIR
OF THE CENTRAL UNIVERSITY
OF VENEZUELA
concert held on April 1, 1962
in the Rackham Lecture Hall
at 4:30 P.M..
No admission charge
Dial2-6264
"WHERE THE BOYS ARE"
\Now!at 2:50 -6:20 & 9:50
Te himuOuS ineide storg
OF WHAT GOES ON WHEN SCHOOL LETS OUr..
pa
rip roaring
Spring
4 ~ Vacations!
GOLDWYN1
MAYER.1
A EdTFAPE
DOLORES HART. GEORGE HAMILTON
YVETTE MIMIEUX -JIM HUITON - BARBARA NICHOLS - PAULA PRENTISS
.n FRANK GORSHIN Aa CONNIE FRANCIS ALSO t
"THE GAZEBO"
at 1:10 - 4:40 - 8:10
<" :: KOOKIEST MURDER MOVIE EVER I
r GLEn DEBBIE
FORD REynOLDS
.a ' InANAVNPRODUCTION'
- +1"EGAZEBO"
cnin.CARL REINER
wi JOHN McGIVER
be CJNEMASCOPE

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DIAL NO 8-6416

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