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March 31, 1962 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-03-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

By GLORIA BOWLES
Daily Correspondent
PARIS-The city has been rela-
tively calm in this first week
and a half after the proclamation
of the "cessez-le-feu" which
brought an end to the seven-and-
a-half year Algerian war.
President De Gaulle's announce-
ment a week ago Sunday was ex-
pected to touch off a series of
protests by the OAS (Secret Army
Organization), even more violent
than those that preceded the
cease-fire. The small Sunday night
crbwd at Opera-Comique 'was an
indication of this fear. Ticket-
holders preferred to stay home
rather than risk going out into
the streets.
", * *
BUT ALTHOUGH bombings and
assassin actions have increased
considerably in Algeria, the ex-
pected OAS activity in Paris and
on the mainland has not yet ma-
terialized.
In fact, in Paris, you have the
feeling that nothing new has hap-
pened, that nothing out of the
ordinary is taking place. Parisians
gather around newstands to read
of violence in "Alger" or Oran or
Bab-El-Oued, students still dem-
onstrate occasionally, and of
course, you notice an overabund-
ance of policemen in Paris. But
after a time, you become accust-
omed to seeing the streets lined
with gendarmes, and showing
your identification card.
4,*

in Paris;

Violence

in Algiers

CLASSIFIEDS

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. 5I
CITY OF STRIFE--Above is a map of .Algiers, *capital of French Algeria and scene of some of the bitterest fighting between government police and troops and Secret

BIKES and SCOOTERS
MO-PED SCOOTER. Good condition.
$60. Call NO 2-2858. Z24
FOR SALE: All-state Mo-Ped, like new,
$69. 2-4398 after 5:30 p.m. Z13
BEAUTIFUL, red-black. 1955, 200 c.c.
Zundap motorcycle. Very reasonable.
After' 5 p.m. Call HA 6-3441. Z22
DO YOU FIND IT hard to get from
the IM Building to Frieze Hall in
lust 10 minutes? If you have this
trip or any other long one, solve
your problem with a bike from
BEAVER'S BIKE AND HARDWARE
605 Church NO 5-6607
Z17
PERSONAL
INTRODUCING THE 28 F5
BE SURE not to miss corridor 4 as you
plod through the house today. F21
CONGRATULATIONS 1!1
Lynne and Turk F22
INTRODUCING the 28 Pi Phi pledges,
Sunday from 3-5 p.m. with songs by
the "Psurfs." P20
YOUNGER THAN SPRINGTIME AM I.
Gayer than laughter am' .Say, how
gay is laughter? Miserable ,F25
LEAGUE PETITIONING NOW OPEN I
Hurry! Pick up your petition in the
League Undergrad office. F5
TO THE 2 BEST-LOOKING GUYS in
385: How can one really abstain if
one is weak morally?
A French Friend 724
LEARN TO PLAY THE GUITAR (begin.,
inter.) and the Recorder. Sign up for
class now at the "Y." Call 3-0536.
$8.00, 10 weeks. F18
ANYONE interested in a jet flight to
Europe for 8 ,wks. this summer; $300
round trip? Please contact Margie or
Marley, NO 3-3384. F4
SOPH SHOW petitioning extended to:
Wednesday, April 4. Turn petitions
in, to the League Undergraduate
Office. P14
NEVER LOOK FORWARD to anything
{ for if you do it's most certain to go
wrong.
.J.

ALTHOUGH Raoul Salan's OAS
is making its major effort in the
capitals of Algeria which is to be
expected, the violent activity cpn-
tinues here. And Parisians, too,
continue to be horrified, disheart-
ened and disgusted by the OAS
bombings and killings.
Everyone is h o r r i f i e d and'
shocked, but there are still differ-
ent shades of opinion.
One 15-year-old spoke o) ithe
discussions of her classmates at
the lycee. "Everyone asks if you're
"pour ou contre.'" There are lots
of girls who say they are "pour"
the long range goal of the OAS-
French Algeria-but against its,
methods. This is a typical reaction.
' * * *
LESS TYPICAL is the feeling of
a 20-year-old French boy, a stu-
dent at Hautes Etudes Commer-
ciales in Parisi Pro-OAS, he wants
to "agir," to act, in support of the
organization. He thinks Algerian
self-determination is a "sellout,"
believes that De Gaulle has re-
neged oh his promises and be-
trayed his country, and that the
OAS is the only existing movement
which still values the honor and
dignity of the Frenchman.
(De Gaulle, although he rode to
power on the coattails of an Army
revolt led by Salan 'and partisans
of "Algerie francaise," was al-

Army terrorists. The Bab El Oued quarter, where the troops and

the terrorists have been fighting for the last week, is on the west side of the city.

ways ambiguous as to his views
on Algeria. In September, 1959,
he boldly proposed self-determina-
tion for the first time.)
A young Parisian woman, about
28, expressed another view: "If I
were a European in Algeria, I be-
lieve 'd support the OAS, too.
One promises to guarantee the
rights of Europeans, but there is a
large difference between a paper
agreement and its implementation.
It's going to be like Morocco and
Tunisia. The French, outnum-
bered, will find it necessary to
come home."
* * *
WHEN IT comes to the OAS, the
Frenchman hardly knows which
side he is on. His patriotism, his
national pride, his sadness at see-
ing the last of the grand French
Empire slip out of the country's
grasp, all make him a partisan of
Salan's army.
But his love of liberty, his natu-
ral hate for any movement tend-
ing toward fascism, and his dis-
gust for violence, render him
strongly anti-OAS.
* * s
THE INDIVIDUAL Frenchman
may be divided against himself,
but the newspapers have taken an

unmistakably anti-OAS stand.
Parisian dailies cary commentaries
and editorials on the front page
next to the news account of the
day's OAS activity.
The case of one little Parisian
girl of four years, was given great
attention. An OAS "plastique" ex-
ploding in. the girl's neighborhood
severely damaged the nursery
where she was sleeping. As a di-
rect result of injuries suffered
from the blast, the pretty child
was blinded.
The propaganda effect of the
event was tremendous. Parisians,
who up to that moment had taken
only a passing interest ini the kill-
ings of adults, were shocked by the
maiming of an innocent child.
Paris Match, the weekly Life-type
magazine, ran special picture fea-
tures in several editions, and the
case was extensively covered in all
newspapers.
.4 * .
PARISIANS were also horrified
by a bomb explosion a week ago in
the suburbs. Several young school
girls were badly wounded. One lost
her arm. The tragic case was also
the subject of numerous newspaper
accounts.
These two cases incurred the

wrath of Parisians, and aroused
their sympathy. Any propaganda
gains in popular support made by
the OAS up to that, point were
wiped out with the news of these
two incidents.
Salan's goal in the "metropole"
is to create an atmosphere of ter-
ror, panic and fear. "Fear is often
the beginning of sagacity," Salan
says. But such tactics are not
jolting Parisians into support for
the OAS, but rather building up a'
strong wall of opposition against
the clandestine organization.
+ * *
THE EDITORIAL of journalist
Serge Bromberger in Le Figaro is
indicative of French newspaper
comment. Bromberger says: "It is
obvious that the OAS is searching
for proof of strength in Algeria.
They know that she has ninety out
of one hundred chances to lose it
without even having posed a seri-
ous problem, and of the 10 per
cent who remain, hardly one or
two to erect a durable chaos...
"The pride of these lost soldiers
has become so monstrous that xa-
ther than recognize their political
error, they prefer to bury them-
selves with an abused European
population . . . and if possible to
lead the metropole with them...
Honor consists of knowing when to
put an end to the adventure be-
fore the blood is shed...
"But what fragment of patriot-
ism or military honor could remain
among these lost soldiers who,
after so many outrages, even at
the expense of their army com-
rades, do not even try to hide that
their goal is to set the Moslems
against the Europeans ... That's
putting a cheap price on the life
of those very Europeans whose
cause they claim to defend . .-
BROMBERGER, besides sum-
ming up the attitude of many
Frenchmen, touches on two vital
problems. First, what is the actual
strength of the OAS? Second, will
the French army support Salan?
Salan himself admits that sup-
port for his cause in metropolitan
France is not very gratifying. In a
secret directive, which fell into
the hands of journalists, and
whose publication caused a sen-
sation in Paris, Salan noted:
. . In the present situation de-
spite the enormous work accom-
plished in these last two months,
thethe metropole does not appear
to be in a position to give the sup-
port indispensable to the successes
of our action and susceptible, in
any case, to tip the scale of events
in our favor.
Salan has analyzed the situation
well. There are certainly very
few here who sympathize with the
OAS, and even less who would act
in its favor if the chips were down.
BUT, IN ALGERIA, OAS power
is quite another thing. Reliable
sources, notably the New York
Times, report that the majority of
the million French Algerians sup-
port the clandestine organization.
The OAS has drawn its support
primarily by the claim that, with
the pullout of the French army,
the Moslems will not carry out the,
guarantees to their rights, listed
in the Evians-les-Bains agreement.
This argument is enough to scare
Europeans into support. And with
massive killings, in times when
men are afraid to step out of
their homes for fear of being shot
in the back, one does not openly
express opposition to the OAS. For1
French Algerians .who feel they
have been desertd by De Gull

.l .
I Disgusted and Disgruntled I

AND TO THINK I am still working and
that I've been replaced already. There
Is no justice. Even I am not 'indlis-
pensable. $30 to the good. F23.
WHOEVER SAID bad luck comes in 3's
wasn't kidding. AOE, I'm under the
impression that you're conspiring.
J. L.
Disgusted and Disgruntled ! F2'
I DREAMED I flew from Detroit to
London for $326 round trip on a BOAC
turbo-jet: You can too!! June 20't6
Sept. 4. Call Doug or Sam, NO 5-9195.
P15
ANY INDEPENDENT WOMEN living in
an apartment, who wish to vote for
the pres. of Assembly Asso., may at-
tend the ADC meeting at 3529 S.A.B.
at 4:15 p.m. Monday, April 2, to cast
their ballots. F19
DIAMONDS--WHOLESALE
From our mines to you
at considerable savings
Robert Haack Diamond Importers
First National Bldg., Suite 504
By appointment only, NO 3-0653
F20
WITH A DAMN, DAMN, DAMN
The Dragon Ladies stalk
Throughthe April rain
After hours of talk
On who will receive
The profits of bicker
tFor activity life
A bright yellow slicker.
Go By Chartered Bus To
CLEVELAND
LEAVE ANN ARBOR APRIL 6, 4:30 P.M.
ROUND TRIP FARE $8.75
CALL: GARY WEINER, 6815
South Quad, Ext. 361, by April 1
F11'

F'2

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISINi
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DA
2 .70 1.95 3.45
4 1.00 2.85 4.~
Figure 5 overage words to a line,
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. dily
Phone NO 2-4786
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Retina Reflex 8 f.9.1
cessories. Call JTerry, 65-7157.
POODLE-Beautiful, toy male pu
Must s 61immediately. Terms possi
Call 665-7939.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST Wednesday on S. Universai
Royal blue purse. Reward, call
5-4425.
LOST-1962 brn. calendar appointni
book. Finder please call Ted Sm
NO 2-1553.
LOST-Glasses in grey case. P1
contact Dennis Dildy, 123 Ic
House, WQ, NO 2-4401.
LOST a month ago: Blue Pocket
versity of London Diary. Rews
Call NO 5-0137.
LOST-One black men's topcoat. Ba
at McGowan's Men's Store. Lost
SDT Open House Sunday. Call
Irwin at NO 2-5571.
BARGAIN CORNER
ATTENTION ROTC
OFFICERS' SHOES
Army-Navy Oxfords - $7.95
Socks 39 Shorts f
Military Supplies
SAM'S STORE
122 E. WASHiNGTON
MISCELLANEOUS
THE NEW YORK TIMES delivered d
Student Newspaper Agency, F01
241, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
USED CARS
'60 CHEV.-6 cyl., St. trans., bluea
wh., w.w., 4-dr., radio, heater.c
2-3763. "Nicest '60 Chev. in A.A."
'55 CHEV. CONVERT. All black.
power. Real good shape. No rust.
3-4183, ask for Dietz. $425.
1959 Borgward, excellent condit
Priced to sell. Phone 2-3604.
,'52 MG--TD. Call 5-8691. Good co:
tion. Ask for Anna.
'50 PLYM, 4-dr. R&H, Gd. tires
Call NO 8-9846.
'50 PLYMOUTH, 4-dr. R. H. Gd. T
$60. 'Call 8-9846.
FOR SALE: Alfa Romeo Guilletta co
1959. Excellent condition, recent 0
haul, new battery and gener
Maintained for personal use - n
Reason-unexpected long leave 6
area. $1875 or nearest offer. Call
3-0857.
BUSINESS SERVICES
SCHWABEN INN-The place where
cool crowd congregates to indulg
witty conversation,Agood food
beer. 215 S. Ashley, Ann Arbor.
HI-FI, PHONO TV. andr ado re
Clip this ad for free,,pickup and
livery. Campus Radio and TV, 32
Hoover. NO 5-6644.
BEFORE you buy a class ring 100
the official Michigan ring. Burr-
terson and Auld Co 1209 South 1
veralty, NO 8-8887.
GUITAR AND BANJO INSTRUCT
Beginner and advanced. Imdvi
ual and , smal workshop grou
Classical, folk, popular. Call .
6942. .
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS. GUITARS AND BONGO
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-
Finding holes in your winter clot
ing? Find that the wind whist
through and sends chills up al
down your spine? Then send the
to wa
WEAVE-BAC SHOP
224 Arcade NO 2-4(
"We'll reweave them to look like
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSOR

SECURITY MEASURES-The French police are always search-
ing, searching for Secret Army terrorists, for weapons. This scene
is also in Algiers.

WANTED TO RENT

WANTED TO RENT: Two grad stu-
dents seek a two man apartment for
school year Sept. '62 to June '63.
Must be close to campus. Call NO
5-7638: ask for Ray. L6
WANTED TO RENT or sublease by
research chemist and wife, fur-
nished 2-bdrm. house or apart-
ment, preferably near campus, be-
ginning June 1, for I or 2 years.
Reply W. R. Pierson, Enrico Fermi
Institute for Nuclear Studies, Uni-
versity of Chicago 37, Illinois. L4
REAL ESTATE
STUDIO, 800 sq. ft., Music, Dance, Re-
ducing, Ceramic, large assembly room
33x15, 4 smaller rooms, over Pretzel
Bell, 2-5:year lease. Will sell entire
building of 3 floors. Call Lansing, ED
7-9305. R6
TRANSPORTATION
FIBER-GLASS AUTO ATTIC - Water
proof and lock. Holds 4 suitcases, odds
and ends. $40. NO 3-7754. 06
USED CARS
1959
KHARMANN-GHIA
Red coupe, perfect condition. $1390.
Call evenings NO 2-4843. N24
FOR RENT
CLEAN, QUIET single room for male.
NO 2-7395. On campus. C2
SUMMER-edecorated apt, for three.
1005 Packard. $145/mo. includes gar-
age. Call NO 2-9181. C5
ON CAMPUS. Now taking. applications
for summer and fall furnished apart-
ments and parking. Call between 12
and 7. NO 2-1443. C12

FOREIGN CAR SERV
We service all makes and mi
of Foreign and Sports Cat

Lubrication $1.50

GROWING VIOLENCE--In December, the government called out riot police (above) to quell
rightists demonstrating in Algiers against French President Charles de Gaulle's policy of Algerian
home rule. The riot squads and army troops use tear gas to suppress the colons. But the violence has
intensified since then. Just a week ago, regular army troops moved into the Bab El Oued quarter
of Algiers (below) to fight a major engagement against guerillas of the Secret Army Organization.

LIFE GOES ON-A surprising number of pictures from strife-
torn Algeria show seemingly uninterested civilians walking past a
corpse. The picture shows one of six Moslems killed by European
terrorists on the Rue Michelet in the heart of Algiers.

Nye Motor Sale
514 E. Washington
C-TED
STANDARD SERVICE
FRIENDLY SERVICE
IS OUR BUSINESS
Phone NO 3-4858
Stop in NOW for
brake work
engin6 tune-up
battery and tire check-
"You expect more from
Standard and you get it."
SOUTH UNIVERSITY & PORES
NO 3-9168

almost incredulous before this
balance-of-power.
Before the cease-fire, it was pre-
dicted that the Army, if even
grudgingly, would stay loyal to
de Gaulle. Events have confirmed
this prediction. Salan, in. his se-
cret directive, also admits that the
army will not work for the OAS in
Algeria. He concludes, however,
that OAS support could be found
in garrisons in France and in
Germany.
THE CEASE-FIRE has been
signed, but the war is still not
over. But now, it is simply a ques-
tion of time. On April 8, the

French will probably be asked to
go to the polls for a referendum,
one of de Gaulle's favorite ways
for getting his own way, and gath-
ering a little personal glory for
himself and France at the same
time. It is not likely the French
will turn down the accords drafted
by the French and the FLN.
A "Oui" for de Gaulle is tanta-
mount to a "Non" for Salan. If the
French manifest an opposition to
its policies, the OAS cannot sur-
vive. The Secreta Army Organiza-
tion and General Raoul Salan,
will be rendered powerless without
strength and support coming from
metropolitan France.

FOR RENT-Contemporary styled, at-
tractive, furnished, 2-bdrm. duplex
on wooded hillside near N. Campus.
1574 Jones Drive (off Plymouth Rd.).
Call NO 5-6773. C7
A LIMITED NUMBER of efficiency one
bedroom and two bedroom apartments
available in April, May, and June.
Apply at University Family Housing
Office, 2364 Bishop Street,rNorth
Campus, or phone 662-3169 or 663-
1511, ext. 3569. 04

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