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February 13, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-02-13

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THE Ml

owers Returnsaces
By JAMES NICHOLS jailed while collecting economic on future relations between the gard the release of Powers
e cold war in Europe seemed information for a doctoral dis- two countries, he said. Pryor as a major diplon
ke a mild upward turn over sertation. Both he and Powers The Russian people, who were breakthrough, but Secretar
Neekend as two young Ameri- were being held as spies. never told about Abel's arrest and State Dean Rusk said that th
reetuedastotyoungfamilen- Release Abel. conviction, heard the release ofSteDanussidhtth
returned to their families At the same time, the United Powers described as a unilateral pnisonment of citizens of one
prisons behind the iron cur- the cold war by the other
Stts ordered the release of Col goodwill Lestutre by their govern- ntecl a yteoh

and
matic
y of
e im-
side
was

Francis Gary Powers, pilot of
e U-2 high-altitude reconnais-
nce plane which crashed in Rus-
E May 1, 1960, saw his wife and
i r e n t s briefly before being
lisked away for interrogation by
ents of the Central Intelligence
;ency. The CIA is investigating
e crash of Powers' plane, which
e Russians claimed to have shot
iwn with a missile.
The other American was Freder-
k L. Pryor of Ann Arbor, who has
ent the past five months in an
ast German prison. Pryor was

Rudolf I. Abel, arrested in Brook-
lyn, N.Y., on espionage charges in
1957 and sentenced to 30 years in
prison. The exchange was ar-
ranged by a Brooklyn attorney
who defended Abel in court.
The attorney, James B. Dono-
Van, successfully negotiated Pow-
ers' release with Communist offi-
cials in East Berlin. Donovan also
expressed a belief that Soviet of-
ficials may release a third Ameri-
can, Marvin W. Makinen of Chas-
sell, Michigan, now in a Soviet
prison in the Ukraine. The fate of
further negotiations would depend

guv~t guui 1y iG1gVil
ment.
Both Powers and Pryor were
pronounced in good health by phy-
sicians shortly after their release.
The White House has referred
all questions about Powers to the
State Department.
Sen. John Sparkman, (D-Ala.)
yesterday asked the State Depart-
ment to give the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee a "full re-
port" on its interrogation of Pow-
ers. The committee made an in-
quiry into the U-2 incident in
1960.
Washington sources did not re-

an irritation "that we can do with-
out."
The fact that Khrushchev
agreed to exchange Powers and
Pryor for Abel has caused unoffi-
cial speculation here. Some think
the Russians were worried about
information Abel might reveal
about Soviet espionage in this
country.
It is also possible that the Rus-
sian Premier is seeking better re-
lations between his country and
the West before the Central Com-
mittee of the Soviet Communist
Party meets March 5.

Vest

Wins in Struggle

with Russians over Use
)f Berlin Aerial Lanes

Reds Grant
Allied Planes
Right to Fly
Soviets Change Plans
To Control Air Lanes
BERLIN (AP) - The Western
big three allies yesterday forced a
showdown with the Russians over
free use of the Berlin air corridors
and won.
The Allies thrust military trans-
ports through the north and cen-
ter corridors during a period of
more than two hours when the
Russians wanted to monopolize
them for Soviet Air Force planes.
The Russians changed their
plans, without giving any reason.
The result was that a half dozen
Western civil airliners and mili-
tary transports of the United
States, Britain and France had the
corridors to themselves.
An Allied spokesman revealed
that the Soviet controller in the
four-power Berlin Air Safety Cen-
ter at first said the Soviet flights
had been delayed. Then he an-
nounced they were cancelled.
To demonstrate their rights,
military propeller planes deliber-
ately flew through lower altitude

MICHIGAN FIRST :
IRomney Brushes Off
Presidential Ambitions
By ROBERT SELWA
Special To The Daily
DETROIT-George Romney, announcing Saturday his can-
didacy for ,-Governor of Michigan, brushed aside the Presidential
ambitions that many Republicans hold for him.
"My interests are in Michigan," he -commented during a press
conference at the Veterans Memorial Bldg.
"As a gubernatorial candidate, I will have no interest in any
other position in the state or nation-elective, appointive or other-
wise."
May Run
However, Romney refused to declare himself as not being a
candidate for President in 1964, as former Vice-President Richard
Nixon has done in bidding for the "
governorship of California.
Romney said that his first con-Std ent G ou
cern is his role as a constitution-
al convention delegate in helping Top
to create a satisfactory new con- O am paign
stitution, and that he will be a
personally active candidate only DETROIT - Students for Rom-
after he has completed his re- ney. began their campaign Satur-
sponsibilities as a delegate. day.
That accomplished, his second At George Romney's news con-
concern will be to gain the Re- ference in the Veterans Memorial
publican gubernatorial nomination Bldg., members passed out but-
andhisthrd oncrnwould then tons and other campaign materials
and his third concern wol hnto Romney and newsmen.
be winning the election, he con-
tinued. "We will campaign for Romney
If elected, he said, his only now," Steven Stockmeyer, '63, de-
concern would be to work in the clared. "The organization had re-
best interest of Michigan. laxed, waiting for Romney's
ests M an decision."
Gets Leave The group's main effort will be
Romney has been granted a circulating nominating petitions
leave of absence without pay from among Ann Arbor and student
American Motors Corporation, voters. It hopes to hold a state-
which he heads. wide rally for Romney here and,
The American Motors Corp. yes- sometime after April 1, have Rom-
terday named Richard E. Gross ney speak on campus.
chairman and chief executive of- It will also attempt to expand
ficer and Roy Abernathy was pro- the organization from the six
moted to President and chief campuses where it is presently 10-
operations officer. cated and increase the member-
After the press conference he ship of these groups.
submitted his resignation as chair -_______________
man of Citizens for Michigan.
Romney told the packed press UNIVERSITY LECTU
conference that Michigan's po-
tential is not being realized.
"And the responsibility for that
must be laid, in part at least, at H A RRY
the doors of too many partisan
politicians of both parties acting Editor, The C
like narrow partisans first and Author, "Onl
Michigan citizens last," he said.

OPEN AIR -- The West won a showdown in the Berlin air cor
ridors yesterday when the Russians ended plans to reserve th
north and central ones by cancelling announced flights. Th
corridors for Red Army planes. However, the West defied these
Russians, for the third time in a week attempted to reserve th
demands by sending their own transports through the corridor a
the hours the Soviets requested the space.

-
ke
e
e
ke ,
t

LAST WEEK

ALBERT WIEBER
PAINTINGS-DRAWINGS

OPENING: SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 18
LINDSAY DECKER, SCULPTURE
OTTO NEUMANN, PRINTS
201 Nickels Arcade Ann Arbor, Mich.
OPEN 10 to 4 MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
10 to 1 SATURDAY

turbulence because that was the
air space the Soviets tried to re-
serve.,
This was the third time in five
days the Russians had attempted
to reserve for themselves blocks of
the air corridors to Berlin, which
is 110 miles behind the Iron Cur-
tain.
The West put extra flights of
military aircraft into the corridors
and the airlines ran their normal
schedules.
Some Red planes were then
spotted. But, unlike yesterday, the
Russians did not announce any
cancellation.
Although the Russians know the
number through flight plans filed
at the Air Safety Center, the Al-
lies refused to say exactly how
many transports flew yesterday
between 10:15 a.m. and 12:38 p.m.
That was the period for which the
Russians had demanded exclusive
use of the corridors Berlin-Han-
nover and Berlin-Hamburg up to
7,500 feet.
The Western powers insisted on
observance of four-power rules re-
quiring notification of each flight
through or across the corridors'
separately.
Western officials regarded the
T Soviet move as a probe to see if;
the West would give way. They re-
acted firmly in the belief that to
give way now would encourage the
Russians to ask for bigger slices
of air space and time in the future.
There are three of the 20-mile
I wide corridors in all - Berlin-
Hamburg, Berlin-Hannover and
Berlin-Frankfurt. They supple-
ment links by highway, railroad
and canals.
The Ann Arbor

I

ORoundup
By The Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL-Two wave-
lashing storms whistling into the
central Atlantic yesterday cast
doubt on whether Astronaut John
H. Glenn Jr. will rocket around
the world tomorrow.
DETROIT-Voters in Michigan's
traditionally Democratic 14th Con-
gressional District today will pick
a successor to the late Rep. Iouis
C. Rabaut (D-Mich).
The special election pits Demo-
cratic state, Sen. Harold M. Ryan
against Republican Robert E.
Waldron in a runoff that has at-
tracted national attention.
JAKARTA-Robert F. Kennedy
has a date today with President
Sukarno and an opportunity to
reiterate American desires for a
peaceful settlement of the West
New Guinea crisis. He expected to
take advantage of the opportunity.
r Civic Theatre *

I I

reChen S Deutsch?
Whether or not you speak German, you will
thoroughly enjoy a meal at METZGER'S !
Traditional dishes in a continental atmos-
phere.
IMPORTED and DOMESTIC
BEER and WINE
b",.* IlgetJge1'
GERMAN
RESTAURANT
203 East Washington

!
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';
oI
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INVITES YOU TO A SPINE-CHILLING EVENING OF
THEATRE AS WE PRESENT "THE GREATEST
MYSTERY MELODRAMA EVER WRITTEN."
NIGHT
FALL
by EMLYN WILLIAMS

ii

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