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March 30, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T8E MICHIGAN DAILY

NSITION:
aylor Views Development
f Modern Art Trends
ELIZABETH ROEDIGERv
eking yesterday on "From paintings were statements of ex-
periences, he explained.
to Symbol, Prof. Joshua Not only did they threaten clas-
of the University of Chi- sicism, but they ialso rebelled
icussed the transition from against romantic fantasy.
anal to modern painting in Developing from this philosophy
t fifty years of the nine- was a school which felt "how ob-
century. Jects are seen is better than sim-
Taylor called the end re- ple knowledge that they exist."
I modern painting "a dy- They attempted to catch and hold
n in which we participate the viewer's attention by "infinite
el ourselves a part of that interplay of color," Taylor contin-
ued. They expressed their ideas in
lit in principles, occurringsimple forms, no longer trying to
middle of the last century, fascinate the viewer with details.
id from the crisis in subject Their paintings recalled past ex-
afrd degree of freedom per- periences rather that stating pres-
tanere oedm perent ones.
the painter, he noted.IVy 1 /t7 fR

f

Convenient Means
eality became important, serv-
as an "antidote to convention"
as a convenient means to get=
)f authority. This still persists
y, he added.
he new artists, Taylor said,
me a threat to classical rig-
r. They brought themselves
r to nature by recording what
touched rather than what
saw. They strove to avoid
entional composition a n d
sed the "existence more than
seeing" of an object. Their
wan To Speak
i Architecture
of. Henry J. Cowan of the
ersity of Sydney will speak
y under the auspices of the
itecture college on "History,
Philosophy of Structures" at 4
in the Arch. Aud.

New Couor use
This new use of color developed
into "an accord of tone capable of
exalting the soul to the point of
productivity," Taylor added.
No longer were the paintings of
these artists objects, they were vis-
ual experiences, Taylor said. Such
paintings were "not true to the
eye, but rather compelling to the
mind," Taylor said. A painting
could no longer be compared to
a "tree, it was rather the starting
point of the "infinite imagina-
tion."
Critic Adrift
"The critic -is set adrift in his
own imaginings, and must explain
his. own thoughts, rather than
those of the artist," he said.
Theoforces of modern painting
that sweep the viewer up so that
he is no longer merely watching.
but is part of the paintings, are
the result of that freedom in na-
ture which the new artist demand-
ed in the middle of the last cen-
tury, Taylor said.

PAID ADVERTI$EMENT I

Cinemnaquild
PRESENTS
THURSDAY and FRIDAY

Joseph Mankiewicz's
FIVE FINGERS"
James Mason, Danielle Diarrieux,
Michael Rennie
ROAD RUNNER CARTOON'
James Broughton's Loony Tom, the Happy Lover
SATURDAY and SUNDAY
H. G. Wells'
The War of the Worlds"
COLOR Gene Barry, Ann Robson
SHORT. Psvc. (Conr)

...} ?ft:r.. .SieY <:i;r;
."Y .. Y
conception of their plans for %
to the Design Competition coi
Review Coii
By STEVEN HALLER
Th re is yet a possibility tha
i ? F {
!+. D. Rooevl hih s o
be the product of an Ann Arbc
firm architect Joseph J. Wehre
Out ofterd 547 entries submit
ted for the national Frankliii D
Roosevelt Memorial Design C0m
petition that vas held last yea
the entry of Wehrer and his part
ner, Harold J Borkin, was amon
the six finalists. However, it di
not receive top honors. P
The main idea of the competi
tion, as expressed in the rules, wa
that the essential Roosevelt b
commemorated'' in an architectur
al design. The architects were a]
lowed complete freedom in thei
interpretation of this criterion.
Lanezos ToTalk
OnMath Finding
Prof. Cornelius ILanczos of thi
Dublinschool f Theoretical Py
sics wil speak on the "Geometrica
scoveries of Gauss" at 4p
tod, ariold. SA.kThe lecture
nder teaispice of the In
titute of Science and Technolg
DiAL NO 5-6290
* ENDS TONIGHT
POANK Aini
SINAIRA MIN
*FRIDAY ~
SCREEN SMASH!h

AILC
AjoRTyo ONE,
IN TECHNICOLOR
Dial o 1pltli1ti tt~
2-6264 1 ~ln ~l 111
Doors open
12:45
"THE 4 HORSEMEN
ride boldly out of th
the greatest love stori
This is tb
that first m
dolph Vale:
scribed in S
hours of u
x: table moti+
ture entertf

wo Ann Arbor architects, Joseph
rkin, have submitted this artists'
the Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial
mmittee in Washington.
test Plans
lt_ Memorial

The resulting edifice was to
t stand in West Potomac Park be-
tween the Lincoln and Jefferson
ie Memorials.
III Entries Reviewed
r The entries were reviewed by a
r jury of five architectural experts,
and the winner was then an-
nounced, along with the other five
3 finalists including the design sub-
mitted by Wehrer and Borkin.
r, The now-famous winning design
- consists of a cluster of eight per-
g pendicular tablets inscribed with
d famous quotations by Roosevelt.
This "instant Stonehenge," as it
- has satirically been referred to in
s a reference to the somewhat sim-
'e ilar prehistoric monument still
- standing in England, was designed
by a New York firm. '
In standing by the jury's deci-
sion, the Franklin D. Roosevelt
Memorial Commission suggested
that a statue of Roosevelt be add-
ed, to be placed inside the cluster
of tablets or in front of one of
them.
1e Stalemate
Although the Franklin D. Roos-
R evelt Memorial Commission ap-
n. proved of the winning design, the
i Commission of Fine Arts did not.
- It is for this reason that matters
have become tied in a stalemate.
Wehrer remarked that this sit-
uation could conceivably remain
unchanged for some time, and that
in fact "it may now become a poli-
tical issue." Congress has the final
say as to which of the six final
entries will be used; it may even
override these and choose one from
the other original 541{ entries.
Wehrer added that in light of
these unforeseen circumstances it
is now more conceivable than be-
fore that their firm might have
the honor of having their design
accepted. However, it will probably
be some time before the matter is
completely straightened out, he
said.
To Present
Lab Playbill
~Two one-act plays will be pro-
duced at 4:10 p.m. today in the
Arena Theatre of the Frieze Build-
ing by the Laboratory Playbill.
The first play on the double
bill, "Intersection" by John Her-
rick, '63, is set on a street corner
in a large city. "It combines vio-
lent realism with the strange,
quiet quality of lamplight," Rich-
ard Levy, Grad, the director said.
The second play, "The Suicide
of Rap and Rop" by C. David
Colson, '63, is a "twelve-minute
comedy with music."
The Lab Playbill provides a
training ground for actors, direc-
tors, designers, lighting techni-
cians and includes all facets of
production by students.
The plays are the result of a
collaboration between the speech
and English departments.

POLITICAL BEHA VIOR:
Converse (
By JEAN TENANDER
"Americans have always been
morbidly fascinated by France's
social and political situation,"
Prof. Philip Converse of the so-
ciology department, said yesterday ,
in a colloquium on the differences
in Franco-American political be-
havior.
Prof. Converse listed "the rise
and fall of flash parties" as one
of the major phenomena drawing z
attention to France's political in-
stability. The flash party is the
party which attracts a strong base '
of support overnight and then
collapses within six months to a
year.
It is important to note the level
of society at which this pheno- &
menonitakes place, Converse re-
marked. The portion of the popu-
lation that can be induced to re-
spond to this type of political PHI
appeal is characterized by a low ... Franco
political involvement and, there- gans at the
fore, is not representative of the
whole range of those taking part evidence of
in political decisions. voluntary p
Optical Illusion tween Fran
Prof. Converse rejects as an States, he s
"optical illusion" the explanation The appai
for this alienation as resulting be wiped ou
from a "major social vacuum be- sideration t
tween the electorate and the or- portunities a
Don't Miss:*
PNADECUT
RO
HNEBSRIfN
BOERER
SGilbert & Sullivan's
PATIENCE or BUNTHORN'S
April 3-6
AUDREY A
HEPURN Ta W
Wv T,"TKW RJDO
Ii'r
M/e Y
TECHINR 0
DIAL NO 8-6416

1 " {v: {f~~>~?., " t :}F 4. "$vL%::'"}r":;? "i{'i '.
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cilities in the two countries he
said.
"Given the lower education rate,
fv,, the French population absorbs less
political information than the
United States," he said. This is
ironic in view of the fact that
the French political system is far
more complex than ours."
French politics are arranged,
Converse said, so that the activsts
comprise an elite of only a small
per cent of the total population.
. General levels of political in-
volvement in France do not differ
widely from those in the United
States, he added. The primary dif-
ferences between the two popula-
tions are in the proportion of the
people who readily identify them-
selves with a political party, he
said.
IP CONVERSE Of those politically involved in
-American similarities France, less than 45 per cent iden-
top." There is little
major differences in
olitical association be- T on
ice and the United
aid.
rent discrepancies can "OUR GREATEST LIVI
t by taking into con- -N
he fidely unequal op-
nd communication fa- DAME JUDITH
ANDE
r t... j.. :.
BRIDE
- r."MIA
S~a
BROAD w
New York Times:
performance o
"LADY M
TELEVISION'S 1961
BEST PERFORMANC
Hill Auditoriu
SEATS

[NG ACTRESS"
[ew York Herald Tribune

1

RSON

fight!

ites French, U.S. Affairs

tified themselves with a political
party, or even with the broader
groupings of Left, Right or Center.
This is in comparison with a 75
per cent identification on the part
of the American voter.
This can be partially explained
by an unwillingness to indicate
partisanship, and partially by the
general confusion resulting from
the large number of parties, Prof.
Converse said.
In conclusion, Prof. Converse
pointed to the Algerian situation
as a classic example of the dis-
location between the elite and
the masses. Both the elite and the
masses desperately wanted termi-
nation of the war, but the elites
became involved in a mortal
struggle over the means of end-
ing the war which have not stirred
up strong feelings in the popula-
tion of metropolitan France.

'
, ;
I
,

During WW II, Turkey, hous-
ing the embassies of both the
allies, and the axis, was an
exotic picnic ground for espi-
onage. 5 Fingers is the true
story of the man who had the
most daring and satisfying pic-
nic in modern spy history. The
Germans, to whom he sold such
top-secret Information as the
minutes of the Moscow, Cairo
and Teheran conferences,
bombing schedules, and the
plans for the Normandy inva-
sion, called him "Cicero" and;
gave him a record-breaking
£300,000. But who Cicero really
was, what he did for a living,
or where he got his informa-
tion, not even the careful Ger-
mans could find out. So as not
to diminish the picture's effect,
we will say no more except that
Cicero (his code name) alias
Eliaza Bazna (his real life
name) alias Ulysses Diello (his
movie name) alias James Ma-
son was the British Ambassa-
dor's personal valet; a man
who was as conscientious with
the Ambassador's safe as with
his wardrobe.
About the movie, the critic,
for The Saturday Review says:
. . It would have taken
some sort of major upheaval to
budge me from my seat. I
stayed firmly rooted for the
rest of the film and came away
with the conviction that 5 Fin-
gers (taking Hitchcock and
Carol Reed into full considera-
tion) is the most unusual spy
story I've ' seen on the screen
and one of the very best.
"Throughout the two hour
course of 5 Fingers, a time that
passes all too swiftly, there are
dozens of unlooked for surprises
and ironies, one following swift-
ly on the other. One knows who
the spy is, exactly what he
wants, Just who is after him,
and just how close they are to

]..tale rvava i

/AY CAST
"-ff1962
"Truly stupendous
f this century."
ACBETH"
EMMY AWARD FOR
E BY AN ACTRESS
m-March 29
NOW

re-seeing. Science fiction is the
dull prose of the world of fan-
tasy. A few notions, based on
the indisputable premise that
the coming decades, or cen-
turies, will present scenes un-
familiar to 1962, serve science
fiction hucksters to launch bal-
loons inflated with the gas of
ill-digested theories and carry-
ing along a pitiful human
cargo, whose puerile emotions
suggest that preoccupation
with the Brave New World have
withered at the source every
impulse of humor, logical dis-
sent, or spontaneous feeling.'
Among these jerky spacecraft,
do not hope to view a Pegasus.
True imagination and the po-
etry of the unexpected-,are not
nourished by an obsession with
gears and fuel loads or an
escapist longing for love on the
stars.
But The War of the Worlds
is a film that escapes the lim-
itations of its category. The
late 19th century novel of H.G.
Wells is a classic of its kind,
with an idea very adaptable to
contemporary conditions. We
do not embark on inter-stellar
adventures while carefully,
watching an Einsteinian for-
mula. The invasion of the
earth by the inhabitants of
Mars is not what gives us night-
mares or impels some to build
air-raid shelters; but the pos-
sibility of sudden horror on
Earth is now a reality. Our own
confusions and fears make it
possible for us to have imme-
diate identity with the protag-
onists in this striking and very
well-made film.
Orson Welles first realized
the social possibilities of the
Wells' book. His notorious
broadcast for the Halloween of
1936 terrorized large parts of
the American population, who
were convinced from his docu-

_ .:
- '" VIII

MiCHIGAN Ui

Presen ts

1

4 SHOWS
ea\\\\\\\\\\ at 1:00 -3:
and 9
OF THE APOCALYPSE"
e Bible . . . into one of
es ever told!

DAILY
30 - 6:30
:10

oel

rt

ros'

I

I

IMEMIN WW !

. ' /

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