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March 28, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-03-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

l 28, 196 THE MICHIGAN DALGI

Outlines Nuclear Policy'

TO CONFER ON FRONDIZI:
Military Leaders Congregate

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Protective

;';, .

RuS , roro Aree Strike Seen
ev Kennedy
n eer ey ssus''WASHINGTON (P) -President
John F. Kennedy made it clear
yesterday that the United States
would strike first with nuclear
weapons if they were needed to
prevent a massive, conventional
Soviet attack from over-running

BUENOS AIRES (m) - Generals.
admirals and air force chiefs flew
into Buenos Aires from all parts
of the country yesterday to debate
what to do about President Arturo
Frondizi, who refuses to resign.
Among them was a general who
declared himself in open rebellion
against the president.
Frondizi attended to business as
usual, adamantly sticking to his
post and apparently hoping that
his defiant stand would crack the
military and political front de-
manding his ouster.
Compromise Rejected
The president rejected the rec-
ommendation of his own chosen
mediator, former president Pedro
Aramburu, that he resign as the
only way out of the crisis.
Frondizi's decision brought near-
er the possibility of a military
coup.
Most Argentine military leaders
were angered at the decision of
the Frondizi government to permit

followers of the former dictator,
Juan D. Peron, to participate
openly in the provincial elections
March 18.
Military Unsatisfied
The Peronistas scored a victory
with about 35 per cent of the pop-
ular vote. Frondizi's action in send-
ing federal interventors into five
provinces to cancel out Peronist
victories failed to pacify the mili-
tary.
Gen. Franklin Rawson, 'com-
mander of the 3rd Cavalry Divi-

_______..___,__._ _ _.__.__ f
)

PEACE-KEEPING:

Thant To Ask Cutbacks
If UN Bond Issue Fails
By The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS-Acting Secretary-General U Thant indicat-
ed yesterday that unless a lot more United Nations bonds were sold
by May, he would ask the Security Council for instructions on whether
to cut back the UN's peace-keeping operations in the Congo and the
Middle East.
Thant said both. operations would be affected if the response
of UN members to the $200 million bond issue was "not as satisfactory
as anticipated" when the General
Assembly authorized the issue last
Refute Claims December.
Not counting the United States,
Of Settlem ent 20 countries have agreed to buy
1 $49,515,000 in bonds, subject in
I some cases to parliamentary ap-
In Steel Taflks proval.
Meanwhile, in Washington, Sen.
PITTSBURGH ()-Steel labor Richard B. Russell (D-Ga) pro-
talks continued yesterday amid posed in the Senate that Congress
be given a veto over United States
reports negotiators are "only a military participation in any new
fraction of a cent apart" on a new UN peace-keeping actions.
' contract. Russell, who heads the Senate
Sources in Washington said that Armed Services Committee, offer-
a settlement is possible in a few ed a substitute for Administration
days. Some economic and non- legislation to permit the purchase
money matters remain the only of up to $100 million of the UN
differences to solve, the sources bonds.
A-A- .TA -Ti +h yrlA

To Continue
Ne otiation
At Geneva
Try To Reach Accord
On Basic Deadlock
GENEVA (P)-Secretary of State
Dean Rusk declared himself in
agreement with Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei Gromyko on some
points in the Berlin dispute yes-
terday but the deadlock remained
unbroken on basic issues.
One of the points of agreement,
announced in a joint statement
with Gromyko, was to keep talk-
ing. United States informants said
a second point is that both share:
an understanding their govern-
ments want to avoid war over
Berlin.
With leading members of the
American delegation to the 17-na-
t i o n disarmament conference,
Rusk then boarded a plane for
Washington to report to President
John F. Kennedy that the Berlin
crisis is still dangerous but un-
likely to break out into a shooting,
war in the foreseeable future. He
was followed by British Foreign
Secretary Lord Home.l
Both Rusk and Lord Home said
they would return to the confer-
ence any time their presence would
speed its work. Their aides will
continue the negotiations which
may drag on for weeks or months.
The joint statement said, how-
ever, that the, talks had been "use-
ful and some progress has been
made in clarifying points of agree-
ment and points of difference.
Rusk and Gromyko have agreed to
resume contact in an appropriate
way after reporting to their re-
spective governments and after
consultation with their allies."

A statement issued by White
House Press Secretary Pierre Sal-
inger said that "all available
means" would be used to turn
back such an assault.
The statement did not mention
use of nuclear arms in these cir-
cumstances, but they are a ma-
jor pillar of United States defense
and would probably be embraced
in the term "all available means."
The White House comments
were prepared in reaction to an
article by Stewart Alsop in the
Saturday Evening Post. Itquoted
the President as saying that in
some instances the United States
must be prepared to take the ini-
tiative in using nuclear weapons
and cited "a clear attack on West-I
ern Europe" as an example.
Alsop's article, based on an in-
terview with the President five or
six weeks ago, also attributed these
points to him:
-That America's big post-war
edge in air and nuclear power be-
gan to fade in 1958 or 1959 with
the advent of missiles, bringing a
drastic change in the balance of
power.
--That Kennedy's strategy is to
have sufficient arms flexibility to
be able to choose the response to
Soviet thrusts, rather than have
the choice forced on the nation.
-That two basic nuclear doc-
trines of the past have been dis-
carded: anything- bigger than a
brush fire would be a nuclear war,
and the United States would never
strike first with nuclear arms.
Salinger did not specifically
verify any of the remarks, but he
said "the President's statement
represents no change in American
policy."
TON IGH1
DR. RICH
Assoc. Prof.c
pres
the fifth lectu

ROBERT S. McNAMARA1
... off-the-record
i o Increase
Warheads
WASHINGTON ()')-A high ad-
ministration official said yester-
day the United States plans to
more than double the number of
its nuclear warheads available for
combat by 1965.
This information was given to
some 800 newsmen from around
the country during the final day
of a two-day foreign policy brief-
ing session held at the State -De-
partment.
President John F. Kennedy was
the featured off-the-record speak-
er. Others included presidential
trade adviser Howard Peterson,
foreign affairs adviser Chester
Bowles,-Secretary of Defense Rob-
ert S. McNamara and United
States Information Agency Direc-
tor Edward R. Murrow.
The reported step-up in nuclear
power was accompanied by a
statement that the United States
f has and will continue to have suf-
ficient atomic weapons capacity
to survive an initial Soviet attack
and still destroy the Soviet target
system and those of any Soviet al-
lies.
The newsmen also heard that:
-While missiles are playing an
increasing role in United States
defense, today's B-52 and B-58 jet
bombers will still be in business
into the 1970's.
-The long-range B - 52 jet
bomber will take on an additional
dimension by 1965 with addition
of long-range Skybolt missiles.
T at 8 at H ILLEL
iARD L. CUTLER,
of Psychology
sents
re in the Series
* in Western Civilization'

WOMEN'S HAIRCUTTING
AND STYLING
A SPECIALTY!!
NO APPOINTMENTS NEEDED
EXPERIENCED HAIRCUTTERS
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

I

Presents

INTERSECTION
by -John T. Herrick

and

Two original one-act plays from the
English Department's Playwright's Workshop.
Wednesday and Thursday Arena Theater, Frieze Bldg.
March 28th and 29th 4:10 P.M.

added.
However, top steel negotiators
chilled this report and denied an-
other published report that a set-
tlement had been reached.
David J. McDonald, president
of the United Steelworkers, said
he had sent telegrams to all of the
locals involved advising them that.
the reports "are false."
Negotiators have met for 10 days.
following the resumption of talks.

And in The Hague, the wori a
Court announced it will commence
hearings in May into the question
of the financial obligations of UN
members.
Thant asked the court last year
for advice in an attempt to re-
solve the UN financial crisis.
The question the court has to
answer is whether United Nations
members are legally bound by the
charter to contribute to military
operations.

rte----
, ... .

For Your FLORIDA Vacation

Iir

'An Inquiryi

into The Jew

World News
Roundup

u

on the subject
'Search for Identity and Relationship to God'
Open to All 1429 Hill St.
THE BISHOP'S COMPANY

I

By The Associated Press
THE HAGUE-The Dutch gov-
ernment announced last night the
dispatch of troops and four war-
ships as reinforcements to disput-
ed West New Guinea.
HAVANA-Prime Minister Fidel
Castro's public denunciation of one
of Cuba's top Communists was in-
terpreted here yesterday as a
brake to any speedy takeover of
the regime by old line Reds. Some
foreign diplomatic observers said
it was evident Castro once again
was undisputed leader of Cuba.
WASHINGTON - Secretary of
Commerce Luther H. Hodges an-
nounced yesterday c o n s u m e r
spending has perked up lately, but
the United States economy still is
operating below the level predicted
in President John F. Kennedy's
budget message.
(In Detroit, the consumer price
index advanced .9 per cent from
January to February, according to
the Bureau of Labor Statistics.)
NEW YORK-The stock market
registered another decline in mod-
erate trading yesterday. The Dow-
Jones averages showed 20 rails up
0.33, 15 utilities up 0.02 and 30 in-
dustrials down 3.39 for a net de-
cline of 0.55.

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Lots of clevdr styles too, with -
just enough dash to turn a
casual classic into a ~

will Present
Ala-t Pat on's

CRY, THE BELOVED COUNTRY

fun-time fashion.
Style shown in
green n brown print;
sizes medium and large.

in the sanctuary
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Huron Streets

,...._ -

FRIDAY, MARCH:
8:00 P.M.

30, 1962
Offering will be taken

NO ADMISSION CHARGE

Auspices Wesley Foundation
Henry Martin Loud Lecture Committee

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