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March 27, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-03-27

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w
M

Parker Calls; Horses Dance

aters Cite Pro, Con
Athletics Emnphasis

By KENNETH WINTER
Are intercollegiate athletics be-
g overemphasized?
The discussion, part of a col-
ge debate series broadcast by a
etroit radio station, was pre-
mted as part of the Michigan
nion's Creative Arts Festival,
bich ended Saturday night.
Proposing an affirmative an-
ver to this question, two debaters
om Wayne State University, won
debate Wednesday over two Uni-
rsity students, who defended
ie present practices of colleges
ward their athletes.
Wayne's David Butler attacked
day's emphasis on athletics
arging, "The overemphasis on
bletics means an undue em-
iasis on winning." He added that
aches' job status and salary
tes are based on how many
nes they win, not on their aca-
mic qualifications and ability
teach.
Promising Athletes
Colleges give scholarships to en-
e promising athletes, even
ough they may not be scholas-
ally qualified; and to keep them
ademically eligible, schools give
ese athletes "special considera-
an" with special dormitory, class
tendance, dining and curriculum
cilities, he continued.
Policies stressing athletics are
aconsistent with the purposes of
university." Anything not di-f
ctly contributing to this pur-
se-education-should be secon-M
pry. But the first emphasis in
bletics today is to win, which
not an educational goal, he
inmented.
He attacked this practice as
iypocritical, because schools pro-
faize Team Sets
Luditioning Time
Tryouts will be held at 7 p.m.
dlay in the Michigan League
idio for the Frosh Weekend
aize Team floorshow, Nancy
eitay, '65, assistant general
airman of the Maize Team, an-
unced yesterday.

vide the greatest rewards for
athletic prowess, not for educa-
tional achievement."
Value To Participants
Representing the University,
William Wiers, '65E, said that
athletics should not de-emphasize
because of their value to the par-
ticipants.
"They provide a positive good to
the individual. Athletics give stu-
dents recreation, competition and
harness his atavistic tendencies,"
Wiers claimed.
He said that participation in
athletics provides a "positive good"
to the individual, by furnishing
opportunity for recreation and
competition, and by developing
character.
"Basis of Society"
"Competition is the basis of our
society," Wiers added.
He commented that coaches are
not hired and fired on the basis
of how many games they win, but
for "winning within the rules."
He admitted, however, that some
Big Ten schools had dropped
coaches because of poor won-lost
records.
Also representing the University,
Marjorie Wallace, '62, cited the
advantages to the institution of a
good athletic program.
"Esprit de Corps"
She said that a school team
generates an "esprit de corps"
which envelops the campus and
the community.
Miss Wallace added that specta-
tor sports eive students a chance
to relax after a week of studies,t
and bring alumni back to campus,
reviving their interest in the col-
lege.
Russell Davidson of WSU quot-
ed Robert Maynard Hutchins of
the University of Chicago, who
said, "Athletics are to a university
as bullfighting is to agriculture."
De-Emphasis, Endowment
Davidson said that the institu-
tion will benefit from athletics
just as much, even if they were
de-emphasized. He noted that
Harvard, with less stress on
athletics, still enjoys a richer
alumni endowment than the Uni-
versity.

HONOR YOUR PARTNER-Ivan W. Parker, associate dean of men, calls a unique square dance
which he arranged for horses at the Michigan Riding Club annual horse show Sunday. The drill team
pranced through an afternoon at "The Country Fair," featuring the square dance and other routines
under the direction of Douglas Frazier. Square dance calling and writing is Parker's hobby. "I am an
occasional writer," he says. "I write for occasions.
GOA, ELECTIONS:
Park Calls India 'Changing Panorama'
By JAMES NICHOL$ "as tough and bombastic as any- Prof. Park saw "a great decision
Contemporary India is a "wide one else," he said. point coming in Indian politics."
panorama of change, progress, andI-
sometimes retrogression," Prof. India's Status le foresaw a power struggle In
Richard L. Park of the political "India will never have the stat- India when the popular prime
science department and director of us that it had before Goa," Prof. minister leaves politics. Krishna
the Center for Southern Asian Park said. Menon's faction, favoring a strong
Studies, said in a talk Sunday aft- In the third Indian general elec-
ernoon in the Conference Room of tion, held this year, Prof. Park nd powerful state, may become
the Michigan Union, saw "a continuing slow decline" Nehru's heirs, he added.
He said that his speech, "Re- of Nehru's ruling Congress Party,
cent Political Developments in In- and a gain in strength for groups ' j il gi i
dia-Goa and the Third General "at both ends of the political spec-
Election," dealt with only two of trum." The election was character-
many topics he might have chosen. ized by "the rise of right-wing i
Prof. Park asserted that India's groups" and by a gain in strength D1AL NO 5-6290
recent seizure of the Portuguese for the Communists.
enclave of Goa "was probably jus- The Congress Party won "an ENDS THURSDAY
tified," but not under internation- overwhelming majority" of the
al law. He called the action a seats in parliament, but it does SIN"athrma
"conquest," and criticized the not truly represent the popular
"circuitous arguments" Indians use vote, he said. IMVIL tAWIRO
to justify it. Saturation Technique
Seizure Justified Prof. Park said the re-election
However, Prof. Park said the of Krishna Menon in North Bom-
seizure was justified "from the bay reflected Nehru's popularity as
perspective of the government of well as Menon's. His Congress Par-
India." He cited the 14 years of ty used a "saturation technique."
unsuccessful bilateral negotiations dividing Menon's opposition among
and the "fruitless" United Nations several small parties.
declarations against colonialism
which preceded the Indian inva-
The blockade of the PortugueseTe h
colony by Indian troops "tied down eracst ituLte
a good section of the Indian army"
which was needed for deployment An institute designed to aid
in the. north, where the Red Chi- teachers and school administra-
nese are encroaching on Indian tors on courses on communism will
lands. The political advantages to be held at the University of South-
Prime Minister Nehru and De- ern Califprnia beginning June 25.
fense Minister V. K. Krishna Men- Four courses, a lecture series on
on were important, too, Prof. Park Communist doctrine, a teachers'
said. seminar and evening forums will
He added that Nehru was sur- form the six-day program. It will
prised at the world reaction to be open to the public.
the seizure of Goa. "The govern- Nearly 100 high school teachers,
ment miscalculated how seriously as well as junior college instruc-
many people in the world would tors and administrators, will at-
take it." tend the six week institute, held
The move destroyed the "stereo- under the newly created Research Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
type" of India as a peacemaker. Institute on Communist Strategy Feature 8 Minutes later
This "stereotype" was not entire- and Propaganda.
ly accurate since the Indians, re- The institute was made possible * FRIDAY *
garding "their own territory," are by a $325,000 gift from a USC Alec Guinness Rosalind Russell
.__na_____f____"___-_n_ , ... *"A MAJORITY OF ONE"

See J.G-o.

"STILL AT IT"
'A Swiggin' Saga'

i.

is coming
Thurs., March 29 and Fri., March 30
at Lydia Mendelssohn ...08:00 P.M.
* * * *

11

FACULTY DISCUSSION
UBJECT: Islam in the Modern Near East
.FADER: Dr. Geo. Hourani; All faculty welcome
'IME: Wed. 12 o'clock lunch; Mich League

Don't Miss:"

PNADECUT
RO
IHNEBSRIN
BOERER

Death Takes
'U' Professor
Lemuel L. Laing, 67, former pro-
messor in the School of Business
Administration and University
faculty member for 16 years, died
Sunday.
Prof. Laing received a bachelor
of business administration degree
from the University in 1930, and
prior to that studied in the literary
college. He first joined the fac-
ulty as an instructor of econom-
ics in 1939, and in 1943 was nam-
ed associate professor of account-
ing.
Prof. Laing was a certified pub-
lic accountant and a past member
of the Michigan Association of
Public Accountants, the Ameri-
can Institute of Certified Public
Accountants and several other pro-
fessional associations.

Gilbert & Sullivan's
PATIENCE or BUNTHORNi'S BRIDE
April 3-6

E

{

A 'L.1(WS D'AILY

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"THE 4 HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE"
ride boldly out of the Bible . . . into one of
the greatest love stories ever told!

30 - 6:30
:10

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Love ... intrigue
and Excitement.

This is the story
that first made Ru-
dolph Valentino a
sc':een star. See the
4 Horsemen as de-
scribed in St. John's
Revelation - woven
into two and a half
hours of unforget-
table motion pic-
ture entertainment.

DIAL 8-6416
ENDING TONIGHT
AGATHA
CHRISTIE
THE FIRST LADY OF MYSTERY
AND
MARGARET
RUTHERFORD
THE LAST WORD IN DETECTIVES
SRIN6 YOU A KILLER OF A
SUSPENSE YARN...
NO IFS,
ANDS OR
BUTLERS
ABOUT IT!

"URERI

/ ~

C

i

I

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