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February 09, 1962 - Image 25

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-02-09

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THE MY ICAN. DAILY

EGE ROUNDUP:

Negro University Closes Following Protests

+ )

SANDRA SANDE~LL

TYPEWRITERS
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:TON ROUGE-Southern Uni-
ity, the largest state univer-
for Negroes in the nation,
ed its doors on Jan. 18 in the
e of student demonstrations
inst racial segregation.
resident Felton G. Clark ex-
ned that a "continuous dis-
*ance by a segment of the stu-
' body seriously hampers
academic program of the
rersity." He also said that stu-
'e and faculty had been sub-
ed to harassment and intimi-
ons and that vandalism had
ured
lark added that all students
ld be required to apply for
Imission and to have formal
ptance before enrolling again
in the school reopened.'
Violate Rights
atnes Farmer, the national di-
or of the Congress of Racial
ality, termed the moves an
mpt "to violate students' con-
itionally granted rights of free
:ession and assembly. Requir-
individual applications for re-
ission is an attempt to over-
i by subterfuge the recent
bed States Supreme Court de-
n in the Alabama State Col-
Case requiring legal hearing
re expulsion."
ivitations to register for the
.semester were sent only to
0e meeting "academic and
r standards." Forty students
a denied readmission for anti-
egation demonstrations as
e eight others suspended ear-
for similar reasons.-
Attempt Boycott
group sponsored by the Con-
s of Racial Equality attempted
tage a boycott of classes pro-
ing these actions when school
reopened on Jan. 29.
nly an estimated 300 students
of a body of more than 4,000
icipated in the boycott: One
he leaders of the boycott, Dion
nond, who is seeking admis-
to Southern, was arrested for
irbing the peace and for tres-
sing on the campus grounds.
versity officials announced that
unauthorized student demon-
Uions would be permitted.
EATTLE-Two professors at
University of Washington an-
nced late last month that they
sign the state's loyalty oath
result of the loss of an appeal
the United States Supreme
rt concerning the constitution-
g of the state's loyalty oath
of. Howard L. Nostrand and
" Max Savelle contended that
law deprived them of employ-
i, without due process of law
that it violated rights to free
ch association and assembly.
f 1955, the Washington su-
nce court ruled that the sec-
of the loyalty oath law de-
ig a subversive group as any
nization on the list of the
rney General is unconstitu-
gal.
he n this verdict was appealed
the United States Supreme
rt, the case was referred back
he Washington court to de-
nine whether the law provided
a hearing.
he latterscourt ruled that the
did not specify a hearing but
tthe university tenure rules

did provide for such a hearing.
The federal Supreme Court then
ruled that the professors had not
been denied due process.
When Professors Nostrand and
Savelle requested a retrial, the
court denied the request on the
grounds that no substantial fed-
eral question was involved.
* * *
FLUSHING-The Faculty Coun-
cil of Queens College early this
year' created a committee which
will decide whether the appear-
ance of persons invited to speak at
the college is "consonant with the
educational goals of the college."
The committee, which will con-
sist of two faculty .members and
two students, will at only when
a case is referred to it by the
director of student activities.
The names of proposed speak-
ers must be registered with the
director two weeks before the date
of the speech. If the advisability
of allowing a certain person to
speak is questioned, the matter
will be referred to committee. It
must approve or disapprove by
majority vote, tie votes being ion-
sidered as disapproval.
CHICAGO - Members of the
Congress of Racial Equality last
month began sit-in demonstra-
tions at the City Realty Corpora-
tion office, the firm which oper-
ates rental buildings of the Uni-
versity of Chicago, in protest of
alleged racial discrimination in
the leasing of apartments in these
buildings.
The demonstrations followed a
series of six test cases by CORE
members in which white students
were offered apartments denied
to Negro students.
University President George W.
Beadle admitted that Negroes are
prevented from living in the Uni-
versity owned buildings but said,
"We are proceeding as fast as we
can to attain integration as soon
as we can."
Enormous Progress
Beadle said that the university
had made enormous progress in
the last twenty years and that
tremendous amounts of money
and effort has been expended to
attain integration in the univer-
sity .area.
BruceRappaport of CORE de-
clared, "We cannot accept a

policy, regardless of some vaguely
defined end, if this policy means
the maintenance of the shameful
policy of racial discrimination.
"We also cannot accept the ad-
ministration's policy that takes
credit for their non-discriminatory
policy in academic field and then
turns around and ignores its'prin-
ciples when administering Its off-
campus housing."
Integration, Migration
Ray Brown, vice-president for
administration of the buildings,
said that rapid, total integration
might result in the migration of
many individuals from the areas.
Education, he said, is necessary
before permanent, complete in-
tegration can be achieved.
The university had originally
purchased the apartment houses
as part of an urban renewal pro-
ject to upgrade the university
community.'
LOS ANGELES-The Student

Legislative Council of the Uni-
versity of California at Los An-
geles early last month passed a
resolution recommending t h a t
Chancellor Franklin D. Murphy
make public a basic written policy
on racial discrimination regarding
participation of UCLA in athletic
activities.
The resolution recommended
that UCLA not participate in any
activity when segregation or dis-
crimination exist in the arena or
stadium in which the event is to
be held.
It also recommended that UCLA
refrain from participating in
events where facilities such as
housing, locker rooms, showers, or
transportation of the host team
are segregated or administered in
a discriminatory manner.
* * *
AMHERST - Amherst College
last month announced that it has
established a Dag ,Hammerskjoid

Memorial Scholarship which will
be available to the son of a per-
manent staff member of the
United Nations Secretariat.
The first award will be avail-
able in September, 1962, and one
scholarship will be available each
year after that. The amout of the
scholarship will be based in the
financial need of the applicants.
In cases where no need exists, an
honorary presentation of $100 will
be given.
* * .
DURHAM-The Men's Student
Government Association and the
Interfraternity Council of Duke
University early last month es-
tablished a committee to investi-
gate possible infringements of the
new drinking rulings.
The committee will attend so-

cial functions where violations are
probable, investigate possible vio-
lations and submit the results of
the findings to officials, and act
as a force to prevent possible vio-
lations.
* * *
ANTIGONISH, Nova Scotia - A
proposed two-day boycott of class-
es at St. Xavier University was
called off after the student legis-
lature reached an agreement with
the administration in a dispute
over the length of the Christmas
recess.
When university officials refus-
ed to grant a five-day extension
on the length of the holiday, which
was seven days shorter than that
of the previous year, the student
legislature unanimously voted to
hold a referendum on a strike mo-
tion.

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HOSIERY - MAIN FLOOR

On October 29, 1960, sixteen
college athletes met death in
a chartered plane. The night
was foggy - the flight non-
scheduled. In this week's Post,
you'll read how the survivors
have tried to mend their broken
lives. And why some of them
blame the football coach, the
Board of Regents - and even
the college president
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