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March 16, 1962 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-03-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

uval Explains Kibbutz Role

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

*bELRUUIFfl&S vr

(Continued from Page 4)

BARBARA LAZARUS
internal structure of the
and its relationship to Is-
ciety has been undergoing
, Prof. Judith T. Shuval
ew University and the Is-
stitute of Applied Social

Speaking on the "Structured
Strains and Adaptive Processes in
the Kibbutz" Wednesday, she de-
scribed a kibbutz as a social and
economic collective society evolv-
ing from the socialist wing of the
Zionist movement.
Prof. Shuval explained that the
collective society has become less
equalitarian in its overall orienta-
tion. The gradual change in the
value system of the non-kibbutz
Israeli from a highly collective
ideal to a more individually or-
iented one has reduced the pres-
tige position of the kibbutz in
society. The recruitment of new
members for the kibbutz has also
had some difficulty.
The role of Israeli youth move-
ments which formally supplied
new members has been declining
in recent years. The role of the
kibbutz as a pioneering and de-
fense measure has gradually been
taken over by bureaucratic agen-
cies such as government boards
and the army.
Prof. Shuval explained that in
the formative stage kibbutz jobs
were rotated, and each member
did not become over-specialized in

any field. Manual labor was con-
sidered more of a -prestige symbol
than the "clean"-intellectual jobs.
As the kibbutz grew in size, ro-
tation Was found to be inefficient,
and people began to specialize
more in certain skills. With this
separation of task, people re-
ceived differential rewards.-
"These . pressures operated to
modify .,the ideally conceived
equalitarian system which results
in an unequal distribution of re-
wards. The rewards are not ma-
terial rewards, but increments in
prestige or power."
Prof. Shuval also described the

pressure of the large number of
immigrants who poured into the.
country. There arose a conflict be-
tween the pressures from the larg-
er Israeli society to admit and em-
ploy large numbers of immigrants
and the socialist goals of the kib-
butz.
"With its economic expansion.
and its need for labor the kibbutz
was forced to act more frequently
as an employer."
As a result some kibbutz have
set up a separate kind of corpora-
tion which handles the hiring of
lab'or. In a sense it is "keeping its
ideological hands clean."

'Spectacular' Thievery Strikes
PaPe'rback Display at UGLI.

By ALAN MAGID
A recently completed inventory
indicates that almost half of the
paperback books on display at the
Undergraduate Library have been
stolen.
Mrs. Roberta C. Keniston, head
librarian, said that the books,
whigh, were donated by the pub-
lishers for the display on the
paperback in education, will be
used by the library as the nucleus-
of an honor loan collection to be
opened in mid-April.

The books in the honor loan col-
lection will be shelved on the
main floor close to the periodical
section. This area is used largely
for casual reading and as such will
be beneficial to this kind of col-
lection. The books will be marked
only to indicate the general topic
and will have no call number.
"The books will circulate freely
and will not have, to be charged
out. It will be the student's re-
sponsibility to return borrowed
books to the collection after read-
ing them. The staff at the library
is very eager to try this new ap-
proach on a small scale," Mrs.
Keniston said.

RESOLVED:
1) The Council acknowledged receipt
of the report of the Committee on
Membership in Student Organizations
dated March 5, 1962, and adopts the
following procedures for its handling.
2) The Council, on April 4,r1962,
shall hold a hearing to determine
whether Gamma Nu Chapter of Sigma
Nu Fraternity is in violation of the
University Regulation of May 4, 1960,
as amended May 18, 1960, and, if so,
whether to withdraw recognition from
Gamma Nu Chapter of Sigma Nu as'of
the end of the spring semester, 1962,
(as, recommended by the Committee on
Membershipin Student Organizations)
unless prior to that time Gamma Nu
Chapter of Sigma Nu has demonstrated
to the Council's satisfaction that it no
longer follows a policy of discrimina-
tory membership selection, or to fol-
low some other course of action.
3) The Council shall invite the fol-
lowing persons and groups to attend
that hearing, and to submit to the
Council their views' in writing if they
so desire Gamma Nu Chapter of Sigma
Nu Fraternity, Sigma Nu Fraternity
(National), Vice-President for Student
Affairs, Office of the Dean of Men, In-
terfraternity Council.
4) Any written material which these
groups (in No. 3) wish considered by
the Council must be delivered. to the
President of Student Government
Council no later than March 29, 1962.
5) The invited persons and groups
shall have the opportunity to present
their views to Student Government,
Council at that hearing and to be rep-
resented by counsel there, if they de-
sire.
6) At that hearing the Council will
entertain evidence and views onthe fol-
lowing questions: (a) determination of
facts, (b) determination of whether
or not Gamma Nu Chapter of Sigma Nu
is in violation of the Council's regula-
tion described above, (c) if Gamma Nu
Chapter of Sigma Nu is-found to be in
violation, what action, if any, should
be taken by the Council.
7) In determining the facts, all facts
reported by the Committee on Mem-
bership in Student Organizations in
the opinion section of this report shall
be deemed true by the Council, if by
March 27, 1962, Gamma Nu Chapter of
Sigma Nu has not indicated in writing
to the Council that it considers the
Committee's fact-finding to be erron-
eous in this particular.
No facts additional to those reported
by the Committee in the opinion sec-
tion of its report shall be deemed true
by the Council unless by March 27,
1962, Gamma Nu Chapter of Sigma Nu
has requested in writing that the Coun-
cil find such additional facts.
Where Gamma Nu Chapter of Sigma
Nu challenges the Committee's fact-
I' I

i

i

finding as erroneous, or asks that addi-
tional facts be found as true, the Coun-
cil shall resolve the facts by reference
to the transcript of the January 10,
1962, hearing before the Committee, the
documents then considered by the
Committee, and such additional evi-
dence as is presented to the Council
at its hearing April 4, 1962.
8) The President of Student Govern-
ment Council shall be responsible for
the conduct of the hearing and shall
make such rulings as are necessary to
maintain orderly presentation and avoid
undue repetition; but such rulings are
subject to the normal appeal proced-
ures.
9) In the event the vote as to wheth-
er or not Gamma Nu Chapter of Sigma
Nu is in violation is a tie after the
President has cast his vote (if he casts
one), no violation shall be found.
10) The hearing shall be public and
miay be recessed from day to day.
11) The Council's deliberations after
the close of the hearing shall be in
executive session. But the Council's
ultimate decision shall be announced
publicly and supported by a written
opinion of the Council. Council mem-
bers dissenting from the majority po-
sition may file dissenting opinions. Any
opinion, majority, dissenting or con-
curring, released by the Councilras in-
dicated by this procedure, shall be
signed by those members supporting it.
12) In its deliberations the Council
shall proceed to consider the following
questions in the sequence stated: (a)
what were the facts, (b) whether or not
Gamma Nu Chapter of Sigma Nu was
in violation of the Council's regulation,
(c) if Gamma Nu Chapter of Sigma Nu
were found to be in violation, what ac-
tion, if any, should be taken by the
Council.
13) In its deliberations the Council
shall be governed by the Council's cur-
rent operating procedures, except that
no prior notice of motions shall be
required.
Adopted: That the term of Jesse Mc-
Corry on the Committee of Membership
in Student Organizations be extended
from February 1962 until such time as
a new appointment can be made.
Adopted: That Student Government
Council refer the question of the
Council's financial sponsorship of
Homecoming to the Committee on Stu-
dent Activities. This Committee shall
meet with appropriate representatives
of the League, the Union, and the
Treasurer of the Council to discuss this
question and make recommendations to
the Council on the means by which,
and the organization (s) which, shall
sponsor Homecoming.
Adopted: Report of the Committee
of the Whole, as a statement of the
Council's comments to the Vice-Presi-
dent for Student Affairs on the report
of the Special Study Committee for the
Office of Student Affairs.
Postponed: Consideration of estab-
lishing a National Student Association
Standing Committee,2until the meeting
of Friday, March 23, 1962.
Adopted: That the meeting time of
Student Government Council be chang-
ed to 7:15 p.m. Wednesday nights, and
that the present automatic recess at 9
pam. be retained.
Adopted:
1) That Student Government Council
hire a student to attend the Exam
File.
2) That the student be hired by the
Chairman of the Student Activities
Committee, with approval of the Coun-
cil;
3) That the student be hired through
Mrs. P. Stockwell of the Library's Per-
sonnel "Department;
4) That the student hired be direct-
ly responsible to the Committee on
Student Activities.
5) That the Committee on Student
Activities, with the student attendant,
be responsible for contracting aca-
demic departments In order to collect
examinations; these exams should be
filed, ordered and kept up to date by
the student employe.
6) The Committee on Student Activi-
ties will advise the Council on the
number and time of hours it thinks
the Council should open the file, after
consultation with the Treasurer.
Adopted: Student Government Coun-
cil expressed its intentions to establish
the office of Student Defender. The
Council requests that the appropriate
bodies will consult with it in order to
incorporate this office in the proposed
change of the judiciary system.
(Continued on Page 8)

BUSINESS SERVICES
HI-Fl, PHONO TV, ant! radio repair.
Clip this ad for free pickup and de-
livery. Campus Radio and TV, 325 R.
Hoover. NO 5-6644. J24
BEFORE you buy a class ring, look at
the official Michigan ring. Burr-Pat-
terson and Auld Co. 1209 South Uni-
versity, NO 8-8887. J11
GUITAR INSTRUCTION
Beginner and advanced. Individ-
ual and small workshop groups.
Classical, folk, popular. Call 663-
6942. J20
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
COME IN AND BROWSE AT THE
TREASU RE
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Figure 5 average words to a
Call Classified between 1:00 and 3:00
Phone NO 2-4786

line
Mon. thru Fri.

SPECIAL
SIX-DAY,
RATE
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529 Detroit St.

NO 2-1363

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(Congregational Disciples E & R Canpus Ministry
802 Monroe Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan)
"VALUES AND DISVALUES
OF PACIFISM"

March 18
March 25

Sunday Evenings, 7:30 P.M.
"Individual & Personal Integrity
vs. Social Responsibility
Rev. Harold Duerksen
"Moral Imperative vs. Expediency"
Robert Adams

II

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

11

April

1 Panel representing variety of views on
pacifism.

SUMMER JOBS'
in EUROPE
THE en WAY TO
SEE & 'live' EUROPE
Specializing in 'European Safaris'
For Summer Jobs or Tours Write:
AMERICAN STUDENT INFORMA-
TION SERVICE, 22, Avenue de la
Liberte, Luxembourg-City, Grand
Duchy of Luxembourg

Featuring student ufrnishings of '
all kinds, appliances, typewriters,
televisions, bicycles, etc. Open
Monday & Friday evenings 'til 9.
312
BARGAIN CORNER
ATTENTION ROTC
OFFICERS' SHOES
Army-Navy Oxfords = $7.95
Socks 39c Shorts 69c
Military Supplies
SAM'S, STORE
122 E. WASHINGTON W
FOR RENT
PARKING SPACE for rent. Very close
to Frieze Bldg. Call NO 2-7274. C1
LOT4PARKING available. Call NO 2
1443. C31
MODERN - 3-borm. ranch. Brighton.
$100 down, $75/mo. Includes taxes &
insurance. Call AC 7-3164. C9.
APARTMENT FOR RENT-One room
and kitchen and bath. Furnished..
Immediate occupancy. $70. Call NO
5-8079. C8
CAMPUS HOSPITALS
Large, two bedroom apartment,
nicely; furnished, located near in-
tersection of Washtenaw and For-
est Avenues. Ideal for three or
four. Immediate occupancy. Call
for appointment to see: NO 2-7787
days and NO 3-2763 evenings.
Campus Management
C10
WE HAVE available for the Easter holi-
days-ano our annual college invasion
of Fort Lauderdale-a. hotel room
with private entrance and bath. Two
double beds - will accommodate 4.
$2.50 per person per night. 1 minute
from the ocean-1 block of U.S. No. 1.
Get your reservations in early. Mr.
and Mrs. Wm. J. Sweet, 3000 NE
21st Terrace, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. C34
HELP WANTED
COOK WANTED for summer hotel on
Mackinac Island starting June 20
through September 5. John F. Ross,
3821 Bishop, Detroit 24, Michigan. H16
EDITOR-Business Manager for campus
magazine. Part-time. Editorial and
advertising experience. Car helpful.
Send resume. PO Box 386, Ann Arbor.
H17
PART TIME WORK, male and female,
18 and over. Home telephone contact
work. Making appointments for com-
pany representatives. Large national
company. Hrs. 9-1 PM. and,5-9 P.M.
For appointment dial 665-0188. H18

PERSONAL
VOTE ROGER GOLDMAN LS&A Treas-
urer. P14
VOTE BOB WALTERS LS&A President.
F15
VOTE Stuart Goodall LS&A Secretary.
F16
DEAR ROG-See you at the P-Bell
Friday night. Happy "21."
Your Daily girls Flo
LEAGUE PETITIONING NOW OPEN!I
Hurry! Pick up your petition in the
League Undergrad office. F5
B.K.-You'11 like it in Arlington over
spring vacation. The cemetery is
beautiful by night. R.G. F20
TO MY FAVORITE KING TUT, TUT-
Just one thing to say-Happy Birth-
day. M.H. F17
HELP US WRECK OUR CAR-Strike
a blow against hunger and illiteracy.
Little Daig, today. P18
FRIENDS, acquaintances, and serious
drinkers-Bell party Friday night.
Roger F.' F12
WARUM SPRECHEN SIE NICHT? DAS
IST SEHR SCHADE. ABER, NICHT
SCHADE CENUG. LACHEN LACHEN
LACHEN . P19
CAN WE HOPE ... for a turn towards
peace? Read Disarmament, special
issue of The National Guardian on
sale at Marshall's. F2
THE DATE: March 18, 2-5 p.m. The
Place: 407 N. Ingalls. The Reason: Phi
Sigma Sigma presents Pledges on
Parade. F11
CHAFF, feature magazine for Michigan.
On sale at campus drug stores. Fic-
tion, satire, cartoons,' colored photos,
jokes. Buy it today! F13
WILL PERSON picking up black rain-
coat instead of own in Campus
Theatre Saturday call 3-1430. No ques-
tions. P9
WANTED-Two female dates, moder-
ately good looking, for evening of
March 30. Stimulating, intellectual
experience guaranteed, must be will-
ing to travel. Call 2-4603. F3
THE ISA INVITES YOU to a PIANO
RECITAL at the InternationalCenter
on Friday, March 16, at 7:30 p..n
given by Sheila Bates, special gradu-
ate student in piano. F6
SI ZENTNER and His Orchestra in con-
cert Tuesday night, March 20, 8-10
p.m. Pease Auditorium, Eastern Mich-
igan University. Tickets $1.00. On sale
at The Disc Shop. F??
DIAMONDS - WHOLESALE
Fine Quality at Student Prices
Robert Haack Diamond Importers
First National Bldg., Suite 504
By appointment only, NO 3-0653
F31

MISCELLANEOUS
THE NEW YORK TIMES delivered daily.
Student Newspaper Agency, PO Box
241, Ann Arbor, Michigan. M1O
-a
USED CARS
FOR SALE: Alfa Romeo Guilletta coupe.
1959. Excellent condition. recent over-
haul,, new battery and generator.
Maintained for personal useg-never
raced. Forced to sell at sacrifice.
Reason-unexpeted long leave from
area. $1875 or nearest offer. Call NO
3-0857. #N5
FOR SALE
TWO TWIN BEDS-$35 each, and one
Kelvinator electric stove-$65. Call
Detroit TU 4-4126 after 7 p.m. B17
LOST AND FOUND,
LOST - Omega C-Master Wristwatch.
Vicinity Frieze Bldg.-Call NO 5-0005
or University ext. 3142. Reward. A9
LOST: Six foot black plaid wool scarf
in front of Union on 3/11. If found
call 8-8991 between 5 & 7 P.M. All
LOST at the A.E. Phi Open House-
Men's Black rain coat with furry lin-
ing. Call NO 3-8320. Reward. A10
EXCHANGED at Kappa Open House-
Man's tan coat with red lining for
other tan coat. Call NO 2-4401, 320
Wenley. A13
LOST-Man's black framed glasses in
black case. In or near 1007 Angell
Hall on March 2. Call 3-3471. Re-
ward. A14
LOST-Pair of glasses and case. Glasses
have brown rims and case, is light tan
crush-proof type. If found. call NO
2-5571. Ask for Chuck Lane. F4
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES

;

9:30 A.M. each Sunday, Seminar:p
"The Unfolding Drama of the Bible"

C-TED
STANDARD SERVICE
/ FRIENDLY SERVICE
IS OUR BUSINESS
Phone NO 3-4858

A.

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82

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TODAY!
Michigan Union
presents
Joh Frederick Nuns
noted U. of Illinois poet'
Reading his own poetry
and discussing,
poetry of today'

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SOUTH UNIVERSITY & FOREST
NO 3-9168
85
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grip safe tires
$69.95
OTHER SIZES COMPARATIVELY LOW

PETITIONING

FRESHMAN NOTE:
SOPH SHOW

CENTRAL COMMITTEE

"You expect more from
Standard and you get it."

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TUNE-UP
KENDALL
WHEEL

March 15-26

At the League

BRAKE SERVIC
UNDA-GARD
BALANCE

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Stop in NOW for
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engine tune-up
battery and tire check-up

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DEFIES KHRUSHCHEV!
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That's what Khrushchev screamed,

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