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March 03, 1962 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-03-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Military Seizes Control
Of Burmese Government

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Expect U.S.
Anti-Missile
Bomb Tests
WASHINGTON tom?-The United

U Nu Jailed
This second coup obviously did
not have the blessing of Premier
U Nu as it did in 1958. Nu, one
of the world's best known socialist-
prone neutralists, former President
Thaik and other government min-
isters were swiftly arrested by ar-
my squads which began the round-
up with a visit to Nu's residence.
About 10,000 troops, backed by
at least 30 tanks, blocked all roads
into the capital, surrounded the
airport, appeared before police sta-
tions throughout the city, and
seized key communications and
' transport facilities throughout the
country. Air traffic to and from
the country was canceled.
Caen. Win, an aggressive anti-
Communist, then announced by
radio that the army had taken
control of a "vastly deterioriating
situation" in order to save the na-
tion from disintegration.
Suspends Parliament
As his first step in tackling
what the Burmese press has called
Nu's "16,000 problems," the army
strongman suspended Parliament
and told civil servants to go on
with their.jobs. He urged the peo-
ple-to take the changeover calm-
ly
Gen. Win, about 52, apparently
h was of the same mind as Nai Ba
Saw, vice-president of Burma's
commerce and industry union, who
declared three weeks ago that un-
less the country's policy was
changed "the time will not be far
off when Burma will go Commu-
nist."
Saw, along with Burmese, Euro-
pean, Indian and Chinese traders,
protested against Trade Minister
U Thwn's announcement that the
last 10 to 20 per cent of Burma's
private import trade was being na--
tionalized as of March 1.
Price Index
For Detroit
Shows Rise"
A report Issued by Adolph O.
Berger, Director,' North Central
Regional Office, U.S. Department
of Labor's Bureau of Labor Sta-
tistics, shows that the Detroit
Consumer Price Index advanced
0.2 per cent from December to
January.
This is 1.3 per cent below the
level of the January index for De-
troit a year ago.
The largest increase was 1.1
per cent for transportation. The
major reason for this change was
the return of gasoline to regular
prices after a prolonged price war.
Other increases were 0.9 per cent
for reading and recreation and
0A per cent for food.
During the same month period
decreases of 1.0 per cent for ap-
parel, 0.4 per cent for medical
care, 0.2 per cent for housing and
0.1 per cent for personal care
took place. The index for "other
goods and services" was unchang-
ed.
Compared with a year ago, there
have beenĀ° decreases of 41 per
Dent for transportation, 3.3 per
cent for "other goods and ser-
vices," 2.3 per cent for housing,
1.4 per cent for food and 0.3 per
cent for apparel.
Increases that have occurred
over the same year period, Jan-
uary 1961 to January 1962 are
4.9 per cent for medical care, 1.6
per cent for reading and recrea-
tion and 1.1 per cent for personal
care.

States is expected to try out war-,
heads for anti-missiles in nucleart
tests it evidently plans to resume
in the atmosphere next month.
There was no confirmation here
yesterday, however, of reports that
the blasts would include tests of
a neutron bomb intended to block
the mechanism of an enemy mis-
sile. So far as official statements
go, at least, there has been no
sign that this much-talked-of
weapon is ready for such tests.
However, some officials indi-
cate that a specially tailored hy-
drogen or atomic bomb might be
more effective in knocking down
incoming intercontinental ballistic
missiles high in the skies.
Kennedy Speaks,
President John F. Kennedy, at a
news conference Feb. 7, expressed
concern that if the United States
remained inactive in the nuclear
testing field, while Russia perhaps
prepared secretly for another se-
ries of tests, then the Soviet Union
might be first with a big break-
through in the field of anti-missile
missiles.
"It is a deadly business, this
competition," he said, "and I don't
say much security comes of it.
'Decisive Breakthrough'
"But less security would certain-
ly come out of it if we permitted
them to make a decisive break-
through in an ' area like an AI-
CBM (Anti-Inter-Continental Bal-
listic Missile) . .:
Besides the upcoming nuclear
tests, the Army is planning a sep-
arate experiment this spring. It
expects to fire. a Nike-Zeus anti-
missile missile against an Atlas
ICBM shot over the Pacific from
California.
Red Leader Urges
Summit Meeting
MOSCOW (AP)-Premier Nikita
S. Khrushchev sent letters yester-
day to Premier Amintore Fanfani
of Italy and Prime Minister Abu-
bakar Tafawa Balewa of Nigeria
repeating his insistence on an 18-
nation summit meeting two weeks
hence on disarmament.

Reservists
To Receive
Discharges
WASHINGTON (A-) - An esti-
mated 2,500 college students who
were called to active military duty
as Reserves or National Guards-
men will be eligible for early dis-
charge under an order announced
yesterday by the Defense Depart-
ment.
The order signed by Secretary of
Defense Robert S. McNamara is
expected to apply also to 600 or
700 high schools and other sec-
ondary school teachers now in uni-
form.
The action will release these
teachers and students in July and
August, in time for summer school
or the fall school term. It means
some of them may be getting out
of uniform as much as 90 days
early.
They were mustered into service
for a maximum of one year last
Seutember and October, during the
buildup resulting from the Berlin
crisis.
Pentagon officials said the early
release for teachers and students
is in line with standing policy and
has no bearing on whether the
Berlin crisis has eased.
They said no decision has been
made on a date for general re-
lease of the 155,000 Reserves and
Guardsmen called up last fall.
Students and teachers seeking
early release must present papers
showing they have been accepted
by an educational institution.
They will not be demobilized more
than 10 days before the registra-
tion date of the school or college
involved.
A spokesman pointed out that
similar early releases are granted
to members of the regular forces
near the end of enlistment terms
for school purposes.

said last night he will fight on to
the bitter end to 'prevent racial
extremists from turning his white-
run Central African Federation
into another Congo.
The Federation Prime Minister
reiterated at a news conference
that he will use force if need be
to preserve public order.
Welensky denounced Prime Min-
ister Macmillan's government. In
a voice edged with bitterness, he
declared the British Cabinet is
hampering his efforts to establish
a moderate, multiracial govern-
ment in the heart of the African
continent.
Welensky maintained Macmil-
Troops Fire
On Moslems t
In Casbali

lan's new constitution for North-
ern Rhodesia, which is linked in
the Federation with Southern
Rhodesia and Nyasaland, "favors
the cause of those who want to
break up the federation" and could
lead to a blood bath.
If that happens, Welensky said,
"it would be the duty of the gov-
ernment to maintain law and or-
der . . and I would be willing to
use force to do that."
The 55-year-old Prime Minister
said he failed to get from Mac-
millan "a satisfactory or unequiv-
ocal reply" as to what kind of fu-
ture Britain visualizes for the Fed-
eration.
In a final declaration before
heading back to Salisbury, his
capital, Welensky told a packed
room of correspondents:
"I believe that even at this late
hour it is the duty of the British
government to re-examine its pol-
icies in Africa and to look for an
entirely fresh solution to the prob-
lems of the Federation."
Welensky i accused a Northern
RhodesianNationalist leader, Ken-
neth Kaunda of heading a politi-
cal organization tainted by vio-
lence.
Shriver Discovers
Red Peace Corpse
WASHINGTON (JP)-Peace Corps
Director Sargent Shriver said yes-
terday the Communists are trying
to cash in on the popularity of the
Peace Corps in developing nations.
Peace Corps officials recently saw
Polish, Czechs and Red Chinese
in Afghanistan describing them-'
selves as the Polish, Czech and
Chinese Peace Corps, Shriver said
at a press briefing.

More than 2,000 members of
Kaunda's United National Inde-
pendence Party were "convicted of
crimes of violence, including mur-
der, rape, arson and robbery," in
a wave of disorders last summer,
Welensky said.
He said the new Northern Rho-
desian Constitution - the chief
point of conflict between Macmil-
lan and himself-provided. such
complex voting arrangements that
it would not work.
T h e n, Welensky predicted,
"there is likely to be serious trou-
ble followed by a further surren-
der to violence."
Present Cost
Explanation
WASHINGTON (A)-A $225 mil-
lion rise in the cost of building its
long-range missile bases. was nc
surprise, the Air Force said yester-
day, because in such trail-blaz-
ing efforts the initial bill is at besi
"an educated guess.
Other factors in the cost climi
were the race against time plus a
number of strikes, witnesses told
the Senate Armed Services Pre-
paredness Subcommittee.
The explanation was presented
by Secretary of the Air Force Eu-
gene M. Zuckert and Maj. Gen
Thomas P. Gerrity, commander o:
the Air. Force Ballistic Missile Sys-
tem Division at Inglewood, Calif.
The Air Force spokesmen had
been asked to clear up why the
cost estimates for the bases foa
Atlas and Titan missiles rose $22u
million to $1,272,600,000 after mos'
of them were either complete o:
more than 90 per cent finished.

ALGIERS (A') - French troops
fired on Moslems in two sections
of Algiers yesterday in furious re-
action to the fatal stabbing of two
soldiers by terrorists.
The squalid Casbah was the
scene of an hour-long battle in
which at least five Moslems were
killed and eight wounded.
Some civilian authorities were
alarmed by what they described
as the brutality of the troops' re-
action.
"They went too far," a civilian
official said grirly. "This is not
a good sign for any future coop-
eration between the army and the
hebels to enforce a cease-fire."
Police patrols were pulled out of
the Casbah with'the outbreak of
the shooting there. Headquarters
radioed its units, "Let the army do
the job."

RHODESIA:
Welensky Blasts British Policy
LODN(J)Sr o elnk

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cCO M E 7lTOC

World News Roundup

Cr JI' rH/
SAB BAT

$y The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS-Col. John
H. Glenn Jr. orbited the United
Nations headquarters yesterday to
applause and cheers in half a doz-
en languages. He responded with
his' now familiar thumbs up sign
and lauded the UN as the naturalE
center for world teamwork in
space.
TULSA-The Federal Aviation
Agency will make tests at Tinker
Air Force Base to try to learn what
caused the crash of an American1
Airlines jet in New York Thursday,
Sen. Mike Monroney (D-Okla)1
said yesterday,
WASHINGTON - Welfare De-
partment officials said yesterday
an investigation is under;way into
serious charges against the Pub-
lic Health Service and a few mem-
bers of its staff which were pre-
sented to Secretary Abraham Ribi-i
coff by the Civil Service Commis-
sion. Reachable spokesman, how-
ever, declined to say anything
about the nature of the accusa-
Lions.
* * *
EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE,
Calif -More than a dozen military
aircraft were thrown into the
search yesterday for a missing U-2
plane. Seasoned U-2 pilot Capt.
John Campbell, 36, of Laughlin
AFB, Texas, has been overdue to
return to this desert test center
since Thursday night. A spokes-
man said his fuelwould have been
exhausted by then.
* * *
BONN--Chancellor Konrad Ad-
enauer yesterday ordered his Mos-
cow ambassador, Hans Kroll, to
return home at once to explain
reports charging him with making
proposals about the Berlin and
German questions contrary to gov-
ernment policy.
LOS ANGELES-A bullet-fast
B-58 bomber will make a speed
dash from Los Angeles to New
York and back next week-trailing
a sonic boom behind it all the
way. The Air Force hopes to cover
the 4,900 .miles in' less than five
hours, winning the Bendix Tro-

phy and setting three continental
records.
* * *
WASHINGTON-The Air Force
said yesterday that the lower Van
Allen Radiation Belt now appears
to be no Hazard for space travel-
ers, contrary to earlier opinions.
There is another layer farther out
but the service's scientists express-
ed optimism about what will be
shown by later tests there.
NEW YORK -- The stock mar-
ket Thursday maintained and
strengthened the steadier tone it
has shown in the past couple of
sessions, producing a moderate
advance. The Dow-Jones Average
of 65 stocks closed up .76 at
242.64.

ON

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MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappon Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship.
7:30 p.m. Open House, 802 Monroe.
THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061
Church School 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Woshtenow at Forest
The Reverend Leonard Verduin, Pastor
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan
10:00 A.M. Worship Services
11:15 A.M. Coffee Hour
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY--
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.
For Transportation call NO 2-2756.
ST. 'MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John J. Fauser, Assistant
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 a m., 12:00
Noon and 12:30.
Holyday Mosses: 6:30, 7:00, 9:00 a.m., 12:00
Noon, 5:10 p.m.
Weekday Masses: 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 a.m. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help,
,Wednesday evening, 7:30 p.m.
Rosary and Litany: Daily of 5:10 p.m.

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL'
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
9:30 a.m. and 10;45 a.m. Morning Worship.
7:30 p.m. Evening Guild, 802 Monroe.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister
Guild House of 524 Thompson
Services 9:30 and 11:00 a.m., Sermon Topic:
"How to enjoy Lent." Communion at
both services.
Bible Lecture: 10:20-10:40, Mrs. Fred E.
Luchs.
Church School, crib-12th grade, 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
Student Guild: 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST STUDENT CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron-NO 3-9376
Rev. James Middleton, Minister'
Rev. Paul Light, Campus Minister
Mr. George Pickering, intern Minister
SUNDAY
,9:45 a.m. Campus Discussion Class.
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
6:00 p.m. American Baptist Student Fellow-
ship. Supper and discussion of A.B.C. mis-,
sions.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill Street at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder. Pastor
Miss Anna M. Lee, Counselor
Phone: NO 8-7622
SUNDAY
9:30 A.M. Worship Service and Communion.
9:45 A.M. Bible Study.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service.
7:00 P.M. "The Church and Patriotism."--
Discussion and film.
ASH WEDNESDAY
7:15 P.M. Service and Communion.

NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
2250 Fuller Road (Opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmondy 3-2969
William S. Boker, Minister
Morning Worship 10:45 a.m.
Church School and Child Care.

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow at Berkshire
Rev. Erwin Goede

,,"t

The sermon topic for Sunday, March 4, 1962,
will be: Comments on Albert Camus with
Mrs. Dorothy Bernd, Dr. 0. L. Chavarrio-
Aguilor, Mr. Edward'Jamosky.
Adult DiscussionGroup at 10:00
Church School at 10:30.
Church Service at 11:00.

,1

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Woshtenaw Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. ,Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Hours are Monday through Sot-
and holidays. Mordoy evening 7:00 to 9:00
urdoy, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Sundays

fl

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UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod)
1511 Woshtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Thomas C. Pork, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Worship Services,
Sermon by the Pastor, "Campus Christians
& the Call of Lent."
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 5:30: Meeting of those interested in,
joining Gamma Delta.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper-Program, with reception
of new members and business meeting.
Wednesday at 7:30 P.M.: Ash Wednesday
Communion Service, with sermon by the
Rev. W. Harry Krieger, President of the
Michigan District, "Lord, Is It l?"
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8.6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Compus Minister

it

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AIR FLIGHT to NASSAU

Only 20

seats,

left

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11:00 a.m. Morning prayer and sermon
(HolyCommunion on first Sunday of
month.)
7:00 p.m. Evening Prayer. Rev. Franklin
Bennett.
TUESDAY-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion.

THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OF ANN ARBOR AND THE
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Washtenaw
NO 2-3580
Sunday Services: 9:00 and 10:30 Rev. Elmer
Homrighousen, Dean of Princeton Theologi-
cal Seminary.
11:50 Rev. Jack Borckardt.
CAMPUS CENTER
10:30 A.M. Bible Study, "The Book of Acts,"
Campus Center.
6:30 P.M. Quest and Question at Campus
Center.
MONDAY
9:00 P.M. Coffee and Concern, 217 S. Ob-
servatory.
WEDNESDAY
4:15 P.M. Noise of Solemn Assemblies. Protes-

APRIL 7-15
AIR FARE and HOTEL

MARCH 4, 1962
9:00 and 11:15 A.M. Morning Worship. "A
Protestant Observes Lent." Sermon by Dr.
Rupert. The Service is broadcast at 11:15
A.M. on station WOIA.
10:15 A.M. Seminar on World Understanding:
Lebanon. Speakers, Mr. and Mrs. Moham-
med Yokan.
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
7:00 P.M. Worship and Program with Men-
nonite fellowship. Dr. Norman C. Kraus
will speak on "The Nature of the Church."

ANCHOR INN

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