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March 01, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-03-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY THUe

0

ley Cites Public Interest

Archaeological Exhibits
By STEVEN HALLER
lie interest in archaeology
een growing at an astound-
ite recently, Prof. Froehlich t>
iney, director-of the Univer -
' Pennsylvania Museum, said

NEW DEPARTMENT:
Green Urges Study
Of Labor Folklore

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

rof. Rainey, s p e a k i n g on
hat's New in Archaeology," said
this increasing public inter-
manifests itself in such forms
37,000 people coming to view
exhibit of artifacts from the
b of the ancient Egyptian,
raoh Tutankhamen.
e also discussed the Egyptian
ues which are in danger of
ig submerged when the Aswan
n is completed. Millions of dol-
are needed to preserve the:
is which otherwise will be
ded.
rof. Rainey went on to tell of
technological advances which
e contributed to archaeology,
which have In turn given
h important data to scien-
Among these, perhaps the
t important is the recent ra-
ctive carbon dating method,
which it has discovered" that
end of the ice age was half
ng ago as had previously been

abctor To Tell
f Congo Tribe
physician recently returned
i the Congo, Dr. Ian Schneid-
in, will speak on the "Basala-
ssa, a Bantu Tribe, Congo
" at 4 p.m. today in the Pub-
[ealth School Aud.

7
f
1
t

PROF. FROEHLICH RAINEY
. . submerging pharaohs
Among the many new mechani-
cal devices used in archaeology is
the resistance meter, which works
on the principle that the elec-
tric conductance of soil is alter-
ed by objects buried in it.
By use of the potentiometer, a
modification of the resistance me-
ter, the entranceways to 1,500
Etruscan tombs have been found.
When a tomb is discovered, an
electric drill is used to bore down
into the tomb. When this has been
done, a periscope is placed in the
hole. The periscope has a light on
the end to illuminate the tomb,
and the archaeologists can see
the interior without excavating.
When they have finished examin-
ing the tomnb, pictures can also be
taken through the periscope.

By LOUISE LIND
The University should initiate
a department to study trade un-
ions and their folklore, Prof.
Archie Green of the Institute of
Labor and Industrial Relations at
the University of Illinois said
Tuesday night.
Presenting "An Evening on
Folklore of the American Labor
Movement" under the auspices of
the Institute of Labor and Indus-
trial Relations, Prof. Green illus-
trated trade union folklore through
the songs, anecdotes and histori-
cal origins of Practices and ex-
pressions indigenous to American
labor.
'Intense Reservoir'
"An intense reservoir of trade
union folklore awaits those who
are willing to search for it," he
asserted.
"Like all other folklore, it is
not sugary, quaint or pure; it is
dull, bombastic, banal, sentimen-
tal, repititious, vulgar and lacking
in intellectual and esthetic value."
Prof. Green told how folklore,
a body of material passed by word
of mouth, is very long in growing
and is produced by an isolated
culture group which has main-
tained some stability over a period
of time.
Some Qualities
"Although the trade union
movement had some of these qual-
ities of stability and- isolation, it
Grou T View
UN University
Americans Committed to World
Responsibility will sponsor the
seventh seminar on the United
Nations University, "Administra-
tive Structure," at 7:30 p.m. to-
day -in Rm. 3532 of the SAB.
DIAL NO 5-6290
"FUNNIEST PICTURE
OF THE YEAR'!'-N.Y. Times
HELD OVER

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

in itself did not create folklore,"
he said.
"Movements never produce folk-
lore; individuals do. But it is im-
portant to remember that these
individuals are members within
the group whose ideology may have
a great influence upon them."
Relatinghow individuals in the
trade union movement are able to
dip into the past and adopt mater-
ial to the trade union scene, Prof.
Green cited several examples of
new words, poems, songs, and tales
of protest and affirmation which
came into being largely at a period
of social change.
Teenagers
"Now that Labor has gained so
many social benefits today, most
of these are no longer used by
trade unionists, so teenagers and
folklorists take them over."
Prof. Green offered as an ex-
ample the word "fink," originally
a derogatory term used by trade
unionists to describe a' strike-
breaker of thug-like qualities, has
become a favorite in teenage ver-
nacular.
"Trade union folklore is evi-
dence to the fact that folklore did
not end with the Industrial Revo-
lution," he commented. "There
will always be some persons in
any group who will respond to
their environmental conditions
with tales, songs and poems.
"It is the task of the etymologist
and folklorist to collect and pre-
serve these materials for future
generations."
Prof. Green hurled his challenge
at the University on the assump-
tion that the labor movement in
America through its existence has
managed to produce through the
years a viable body of traditions.
He suggested'that such a depart-
ment could study not only the
folklore of labor movements but
also various other aspects of folk-
lore and society.
Union To Hold
Student Panel
The Michigan Union Interna-
tional Affairs Committee will pre-
sent a seminar on "Student Re-
sponsibility Around the World" at
4:15 p.m. today in Rm. 3R-S of
the Union.
Panelists from Brazil, Japan,
Britain and Russia will discuss
housing, counseling, rule-making
and enforcement, student politi-
cal and social action and other
school topics.
Voice To Discuss
Coming Elections
Voice political party will hold
an organizationalmeeting at 7:30
p.m. today in Rm. 3511 of the;
SAB.
The group will discuss Student
Government Council elections.
RENT a
TYPEWRITER
(Portable)
$5.00 per Month
Ask about our rental
purchase plan
OVERBECK'S
BOOKSTORE1

C ,~em aq il
presents
THURSDAY and FRIDAY

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m., two days preceding
publication.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 28
General Notices
Hopwood Awards: Petitions to the
Hopwood Committee must be in the
Hopwood Room (1006 Angell Hall) by
Thursday, March 1.
Detroit Armenian Women's Club
scholarships and Fellowship: These
awards are open to competition by men
and women of Armenian parentage
whose legal residence in the the Detroit
Metropolitan area and who have dem-
onstrated high academic achievement
in at least one year at the college
level. Applications and further infor-
mation may be obtained at the Scholar-
ship Office, 2011 S.A.B. Applications
must be on file by April 15, 1962. ,
History Make-up Examinations will
be held Saturday, March 3, 9-12 a.m. In.
Room 25 Angell Hall. Pleases consult
your instructor and then sign the list
in the History Office, 3601 Haven Hall.
Approval for the following student-
sponsored activities becomes effective
24 hours after the publication of this
notice. All publicity for these events
must be withheld until the approval
has become effective.
April 20 Greek Student Association,
Concert of Liturgical Music, Hill Audi-
torium, 8:15 p.m.
March 30 Young Democrats, Con-
ference on "Problems of Tomorrow,"
8-5 p.m.
Events Thursday
Seminar in the Structure and Prop-
erties of Crystals: Thurs., March 1, 12:10
p.m. 3065 NS Dr. William T. Holser on
Relations Among close-packed Struc-
tures.
Stochastic Programming Seminar will
be held on Thurs., March 1, 1962 in
Room 247A west Engineering. Professor
W. Allen Spivey will speak on "Some
Inequalities in Stochastic Program-
ming."
University Lecture-March 1 -Room
1300, 8:00 p.m. Professor C. J. Balhau-
sen (Technical Univ. of Denmark) will
speak on "Ligand Field Theory"
Seminar on the United Nations Uni-
versity: Seventh 'Session. "Administra-
tive Structure." Sponsored by Depart-
ment for the Study and Promotion of
a UN University, Americans Committed
to World Responsibility. Discussant:
Professor Algo Henderson, Director of
the Center for Studies on Higher Edu-
cation and former President of Antioch
College, 7:30 p.m., Room 3532, Student
Activities Building.
Events Friday
International Students Association
Square Dance: Fri.,tMarch 2 at 8:30 p.m.
in the Women's Athletic Building. The
caller will be Dean Ivan Parker. Re-
freshments will be served. Admission
free, non-members 50 cents.
Composers Forum: Compositions by
student composers David Schwartz, Rog-
er Reynolds, Gregory Kosteck, David
Maves, and Uel Wade will be performed
by soloists and instrumental ensem-
bles on Fri., March 2, 8:30 p.m., Aud.
A, Angell Hall. Open to the general
public.
Spring Colloquium: Auspices of the
Department of Psychology. Dr. Murray
Sidman, Massachusetts General Hospi-
tal, speaking on "The Individual Or-
ganism in Behavorial Research," Fri.,
March 2, 4:15 p.m., Aud. B, Angell Hall.
Coffee hour before colloquium in Room
3417 Mason Hal.
Psychology Colloquium: Dr. Murray
Sidman, Mass. Gen. Hosp., will speak on
"The Individual Organism in Behav-
orial Research" at 4:15 p.m., Fri., March
2 in Aud. B, Angell Hall. Coffee hour
at 3:45 p.m. In room 3417, Mason Hall
Lounge.
Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEW, Bureau of
Appointments- Seniors and graduate
students, please call Ext. 3544 for inter-
view appointments with the following:
ANNOUNCEMENT:
FRI., MARCH 2-
Abitibi Corp., Alpena, Mich. - Bus.
Ad. or LS&A grad for Mgmt. Training
Program. Young men, military obliga-
tions completed, , who would enjoy
working In northern part of state. Pos-
sibly someone who comes from the
north country. Abitibi, a well estab-
lished company dealing in wood prod-
ucts, has new production plans for an
expanded painted board line in near
future. Career opportunity.
MARCH 5-7-
U.S. Navy-Naval Officers Procure-
ment Team from Detroit &' Naviator
Team from Naval Air Station, Grosse
Ile, Mich., will interview potential of-
ficer candidates Mon. through Wed. on

the ground floor of the Mich. Union.
Will furnish material on all Naval. Of-
ficer programs. No appointment neces-
sary.
.TUES., MARCH 6-
American National Bank & Trust Co.
of Chicago, Il. - Feb., June & Aug.
grads. Men with degree in Liberal Arts
or Bus. Ad. for Banking & Accounting
Programs.
International Paper Co., New York,
N.Y.-Feb., June & Aug. grads for lo-
cations throughout U.S. Men with de-
gree in any field for job opportunities

in Production, Market Research & Sales.
Prentice-Hall, Inc., Chicago, III.-Feb.,
June & Aug. grads for locations
throughout U.S. Men with degree in
Liberal Arts or Bus. Ad. for Book Rep-
resentatives. These reps. will call on
college professors to sell books for
classroom use, & to negotiate with them
regarding publishing of their manu-
scripts. Opportunities for promotion in
both domestic & foreign areas. Some
sales territories require no travel &
some only limited amount of travel by
car.
Continental Casualty Co., Chicago, Ill.
-Feb., June & Aug. grads. Men &
WOMEN 'with degree in Liberal Arts or
Bus. Ad. for Underwriting Dept.; Claim
Dept.; Actuarial Dept.; Promotion
Dept., including Adveritsing; Agency
Dept.; Law Dept.; Investment Dept.; and
Acctg. & Stat. Dept. Especially want
women with Math majors.
WED., MARCH 7--
Travelers Insurance Co., Hartford,
Conn.-Feb., June & Aug. grads for po-
sitions throughout U.S. Men & WOM-
EN in Liberal Arts or Bus. Ad. for
following divisions: Actuarial, Claims,
Sales & Service, Underwriting or Ad-
ministration. Company writes all kinds
of insurance & bonds commonly ob-
tainable.
International Business Machines,
Dearborn, Mich.-Feb., June & Aug.
grads for IBM. offices, plants & labs.
Men & WOMEN with degrees in Econ.,
Applied Math.; BS, MS, PhD in Phys-
ics, Math; and MS,. PhD In Astronomy
for Res. & Dev., Design, Elec. Comput-
ing, Systems Dev. & Analysis, Pro-
gramming Trng. & Sales. All managerial
trainees go in through one of the above,
programs. Also interested in women as
Systems Service Rep.
I-B.M. World Trade Corp., New York,
N.Y.-Feb., June & Aug. grads for lo-
cations overseas in student's home
country. Foreign nationals only tos work
in home country upon graduation. In-
terested in students fromall fields, in-
cluding Engrg. & Bus. Ad. Require-
ments for students from India are pres-
ently satisfied. Greatest current need
for people from Central & South Amer-
lca, Japan, Australia, Germany & Scan-
dinavian countries.
THURS., MARCH 8--
LB.M.-(See Wed. listing).
(Continued on Page 4)

I

We are now
Delivering
PIZZA and SUBS
DOMINICK'S
NO 2-5414
DIAL NO 8-6416
ENDS TONIGHT
She invited love
y -and hate.

i

I

King Vidor's
HALLELUJAH
ALL-NEGRO CAST

: Brtkhage's The Way to Shadow Garden

Laughs
are back!
Love is
backs

Saturday and Sunday

Fritz Lang's M
PETER LORRE, ELLEN WIDMANN
Short: A Time for Bach (Bach Aria Group)

r
r
r
IM
.9
',9
I,
r
V
r
r
M
r

With Madeleine Robinson
who won the Golden
Lion Award for her performance
at the Venice Film Festival.
* FRIDAY
Double Encore Program
"THE I "TWO
HUSTLER" Ill WOMEN"

Released in the autumn of
1929, Hallelujah was hailed as
a masterpiece. From its direc-
or, King Vidor, the creator of
The Big Parade and The Crowd,
nuch, of course, was expected.
But here was at last a sound
ilm that was not debauched by
he sensational possibilities of
he new medium. Critics noted
with pleased astonishment that
ven silence could be used cre-
atively. Richard Watts, still on
;he New York critics' circuit,
proclaimed Hallelujah "One of
he most distinguished and ex-
iting moving pictures ever
nade," -- he compared it to
Greed and Potemkin. One of
he fathers of the documentary
ilm, a person most unlikely to
e swayed by commercialism,
?are Lorentz said that after
zaving yelled himself hoarse in
Ais enthusiasm his considered.
'erdict was: "I think that Vi-
lor, in his casting, his music,
is story, and his photogra-
thy, created the greatest dra-
natization of the Negro, as he
xists outs5% the Harlem cul-
ure belt, that can ever be done
iith the (movie form." When
omne years later the French
ritics Bardeche and Brasillach
rrote their history of world
ilm they nominated Hallelu-
ah as one of the four or five
nost important films everl
nade; and Paris, where it ran
or two years, appeared to agree{
a this verdict.

not live up to these claims to
enduring fame. Of several
things we can be sure: it is a
striking and unusual film; it
reflects a culture that is now
an anomaly, that received its
first conceptual assaults under
the New Deal only a few years
after the film was made, crum-
bled further under the pro-
gressive industrialization of the
South, where now more Negroes
live in the cities than in the
countryside, and survives as
much in nostalgic memory as
in any fact. For in the past two
years the face of even the most
rural South has greatly
changed.
The reaction of the New Ne-
gro may be gauged from the
criticism of L. D. Reddick, dis-,
missed unilaterally in 1960 from
the Alabama State faculty by
that caric'ature of a southern
governor, John Patterson. Prof.
Reddick observed that "Halle-
lujah was significant in that it
gave Negro actors important
roles and did not exhibit the
crude insults which disturb Ne-
gro patrons; however, it did
not advance very far beyond
the usual stereotypes and, as
everyone could see, being all-
Negro it was by that token a
Jim Crow film."

ROCK HUDSON
DRIS DAY'
TONY RANDALL_

AIR FLIGHT to NASSAU

i

I I

Come to the4
I.S.A. SQUARE DANCE
for a GOOD TIME!
DEAN IVAN PARKER, Caller
8:30 PM Friday, March 2nd
Women's Athletic Building
Refreshments will be served
MEMBERS FREE NON-MEMBERS 50c
Shows Sunday thru
4A Thurs. at 2:00-5:00 & 8:00
[N0I2-6254 Friday and Saturday at
12:00-3:00-6:00& 9:00
* HELD OVER! Thru WEDNESDAY;*
pesents SAA z
_( L4 .

. s
+ swimming

For Contracts and Information-UNION

U

I'

t in the rural South and
largely in Tennessee and
.nsas, Hallelujah attempted
>rtray the soul of the post-
m Negro; King Vidor said
had no need for glycerine
The story of a young man
kills unwittingly and gets
ion but cannot resist the
of \fh fnph rp fa mai

Who can be more universal-
ly loathed than the sex fiend
who preys on children? Pris-
ons, composed of the "dregs of
humanity" despise the sick in-
dividuals committed for these
crimes; and their reaction is
wholeheartedly shared by the
vast majority of people who
have never had even a single
brief, telling police experience.
"It could be my child," is the
universal cry. But what if your
child were the sex criminal?
This problem is seldom faced.

I

I

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