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February 27, 1962 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-02-27

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUE

IONAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION:
zlany Projects Further Aims

Q

'OR'S NOTE-This article is
and of a three part series
ing the founding, purposes,
and controversies of the
I Student Association.)

By PHILIP SUTIN
'o carry out its purpose as
ed in its constitution's pre-
>le, of maintaining academic
dom, improving democratic
dent government, and develop-I
better educational standards,
United States National Stu-
t Association undertakes a va-
y of projects.
hese programs are grouped in
general areas, each headed by
ice-president. One deals with
lent government and student
es in the United States. The
)nd involves NSA's interna-
al relations.
oth programs have grown con-}
rably in scope since NSA's
iding in '1947. That year, the
inization was more concerned
z international affairs and did
inherit any national machin-
from any of the groups that
e, in part, its predecessors.
Charity Funds
oday, both vice-presidents are
harge of many programs rang-
from charitable fund raising
eminars. NSA is, in fact, con-
ring splitting the two program
-presidencies to four so that
regions of the United States
be covered better.
he Student Government Infor-
ion Service (SGIS) is a clear-
house for information on stu-
government. It conducts re-
ch on its problems, maintains
iding library for member units
collects information from
iber schools. And student gov-
nent can obtain information in
areas of government, campus
munications, higher educa-
student activities, student po-
al and social responsibility,

WORKSHOP--Sessions, like this one at last November's NSA
regional conference at the University, are part of NSA's program
of improving student government.

and student values by writing to
SQIS.
Also aiding student governments
is the Student Body Presidents
Conferences, held four days before
the full NSA Congress. At this
conference student government'
chiefs exchange views in an at-
tempt to get a broader view of the
student community and the prob-
lems leaders face on their respec-
tive campuses.
Spur Developnient,
To spur the development of stu-
dent government, NSA holds the
Student Government Achievement
Competition each year. Colleges
and university student govern-
ments receive $100 and a - plaque
for outstanding projects. Wayne
State University won this prize
for student, faculty and adminis-
tration conferences several years
ago.
NSA is also affiliated as the
student representative with the
White House Conference on Edu-
cation, the American Council of
Education, and the United States
National Commission for UNES-
CO.

rost Cancels
J' Appearance
obert Frost will be unable to
icipate in this year's Creative
Festival.
he noted poet, invited by the
higan Union, is resting under
or's orders in Florida and
not guarantee hits attendance,
on Executive Vice-President
d Fay, '62, said yesterday.
be Union's Special Events
imittee has not yet decided
ther to obtain a replacement
o revamp the festival, which
ated for March.
owever, there is a possibility
Frost, who is eager to do so,
come back for a separate
arance after the festival in
i, Fay said,

III: . J

DIAL NO 5-6290
remarkably fine entertainment"
Tony Randall, whose comic sense
approaches pure genius... he
is superb."
Hollywood at its best . . some-
body out there likes us."
-Ralph Stingel, Michigan Doily
,.........................*.......
ROCOK HUDSON
DoRus DAY
ONY RANDAL-
IBEADAMS-JKAlE
ACK KRUSCII .

As part of its international re-
sponsibilities, NSA conducts an In-
ternational Student Relations
Seminar each summer at the Uni-
versity 'of Pennsylvania.
Consider Problems
During the nine-week seminar,
participants consider current in-
ternational problems and princi-
ples, the political ,economic and
social problems of the various re-
gions .of the world, and the devel-
opment and problems of interna-
tional student organizations. Lead-
ing speakers in education and in-
ternational student organizations
address the seminar to supplement
individual research work.
NSA brings 84 foreign students
to American colleges and univer-
sities as part of the Foreign Stu-
dent Leadership Project each year.
Partially sponsored by the Ford
Foundation.
The association deals with oth-
er student groups in the world
through the International Student
Green To Speak
On Union Folklore
The Institute of Labor and In-
dustrial Relations will, sponsor an
evening with Archie' Green, the
only labor folklorist in the United
States, at 8:00 p.m. today in the
third floor conference room of the
Michigan Union.'
Green will present "An Evening
on Folklore 'of the American La-
bor Movement."

Conference and its administrative
arm, the Coordinating Secretar-
iat (COSEC). Unlike the Interna-
tional Union of Students, ISC is a
confederation of national unions
of students which allows local au-
tonomy for each group. Through
it, observers are exchanged be-
tween various student groups and
international projects are carried
out.
NSA is the American represen-
tative in World University Serv-
ice. WUS collects money to aid
student projects in undeveloped
nations and aids refugee students
such as those from Algeria.
Attorney Cites
Freedom .Loss
By ROBERT SELWA
American students of today, al-
though more sophisticated, are less
free in many ways than their
counterparts of a generation ago,
Ann Fagan Ginger, '4711., said in
a talk directed to the members
of Voice political party Sunday
at the Michigan Union.
Mrs. Ginger is an attorney and
at present is editor of the "Civil
Liberties Docket."
She cited loyalty oaths, full-
time security officers at colleges,
and the fear of reprisal as present
examples of restrictions on free-
dom. Students can have no more
rights than the population at
large, she added.
Jailed for Ideas
"When a man is in jail for his
ideas, the situation poses a threat
to those out of jail who wish to
promulgate their ideas. And if a
teacher has to take a loyalty oath,
he is not as free to say what he
wants and students are not as free
to listen to what they want to
hear," she noted.
Referring to the cases of Lloyd
Barenblatt and H. Chandler Davis
and to the pending case of Ed-
ward Yellin, all former students
or faculty men at the University,
Mrs. Ginger said that when one
student from the University goes
to jail for not answering the
questions of the House Un-Ameri-
can Activities Committee, it af-
fects all students.
Loyalty oaths have become more
and more common. They are even
required of Indiana prizefighters.
What is even more alarming, she
added, is that the concept of these
oaths is becoming acceptable.
Students Benefit
Mrs. Ginger stressed that as
Negro students today gain their
rights in the South, students
throughout the nation benefit and
that when Negroes gain their vote
in the South they probably will not
re-elect congressmen who today
favor the continuation of HUAC
and who oppose much progressive
social legislation.
She added that academic free-
dom is a "threshhold" problem
which when once resolved, can be
studied.

U' Tol~ein
Health Test
Eva luations
By DONNA ROBINSON
The University Center for Re-
search in Diseases of the Heart
and Related Disorders is planning
to re-examine inhabitants of Te-
cumseh, Michigan to find out
what has happened to them in the
three years since they were first
tested, John Napier of the public
health school said yesterday.
The original study, which ran
from February, 1959 through 1960,
consisted of a thorough physical
examination and recording of
medical histories of the Tecumseh
people.
Its aim was to determine the
origin, cause and distribution of
disease and disability with the
population. At the beginning of the
study the Center did not yet
exist.'
Tecumseh Grant
The Tecumseh study was provid-
ed for in 1957 by a state grant
to the University School of Pub-
lic Health. The grant was part
of the state's larger program aim-
ed at the preservation and utiliza-
tion of human resources.
In 1959 a grant from the Na-
tional Heart Institute to Doctors
Thomas Francis, Jr. and F. H.
Epstein of the University public
health school's epidemiology de-
partment provided funds for a
major study of cardio-vascular
diseases and other disorders within
the Tecumseh area. The center
was officially formed in Septem-
ber, 1961.
The work of the center is con-
cerned both with testing old medi-
cal hypotheses as well as finding
new ones.
Close Integration
Its aim is a close integration be-
tween population studies, primarily
in Tecumseh, and laboratory and
clinical investigations. The center
is a collaborative effort between
various departments in both the
public health and medical schools.
The time since the base in--
formation was compiled has been'
spent analyzing results and pre-
paring for new and more detailed
studies, Napier said.
Some of the people in the orig-
inal study have since developed
new diseases or even died. The new
study will uncover these condi-
tions and researchers will then
attempt to determine what factors
reported in the patients original
records might have contributed
to the disease, and how these fac-
tors could be used to predict the
disease in others.
Original Study
Since the original study com-
prised all age groups, periodic
studies will provide a constantt
supply of data as the participants4
grow older.
One of the most unique aspects
of the study, Napier said, is tue
opportunity it offers to study the2
patterns of health and disease
within families and households.
Three Viewr
U'Concepts
(Continued from Page 1)
He added that a further threat
was a gradual loss of interest byt
the faculty in the extra-curricular
life of the students. "Prof. New-
comb's idea on using social groups
to integrate and support aspecs of
academic and non-academic ife is
one of the few original ideas we

have had in this area."
Robert Ross, '63, administrative
vice-president of SGC, said that
"most frightening in its absence
is the idea that there is a common
life; that despite our diversity we
can solve our problems together."
Seeing a need for an individual's
relationship to a larger unit he
explained that "only occasionally
do I find that administrators look-
ing at me from behind a desk see
me as a human being and try to
engage me in meaningful discus-
sion."
He characterized the American
campus as "an authoritarian place
with students being ruled by
people they didn't elect. Student
governments neither have power
nor a conceptual scheme from
which to employ power."
"Our concern should be with the
general alienation from public.
concern and government. We need
democrats who demand a say

that we can have some reliability
about its results, we will take it."
Pointing out an example, Presi-
dent Hatcher said, one of the new
relationships developing out of
family life in the American so-
ciety is the tendency to accept
young people as young people and
not as men or women.
This will be evidenced at the
University, he said, noting the rec-
ommendations in the OSA report
for coeducational residence halls
and ending the dual existence of
a Michigan Union for men and
Michigan League for women.
Student Inclusion
Taking a more detailed look at
the report, President Hatcher ap-
proved of the student-faculty ad-
visory boards which the commit-
tee report asks be established to
aid various OSA administrators.
"Students ought to be included
where their interests are most in-
volved and their experience and
hope are in focus."
Asked if he favored such ad-
visory boards for the academic,
decisions as well as student af-
fairs, President Hatcher said that
the Senate Advisory Committee
does an "exceptional" job bringing
faculty opinion to the administra-
tion and added that he favored
any device which would bring
more wisdom into University de-
cisions.
"There must be an easy and
natural way for students to pre-
sent their views and participate in
the decision making process. My
own experience shows that one
can't sell students short - they're
responsible and can contribute to
a good decision."
Student Shortcoming
The only shortcomings in work-
ing with students is their brief
tenure on campus and their prime
devotion to studying-they don't
really have the time to adminis-
trate and aren't here long enough.
"Either of these, however, should
not keep up from making the full-
est possible use of their responses."
The president of a large univer-
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

NOTES SUPPORT:
Hatcher Backs Philosophy
Of "OSA Study Report
(Continued from Page 1)

sity "tries to move student affairs
ahead as much as academic af-
fairs,"ePresident Hatcher said. "It
occupies my attention as much as
anything else."
The presidency contains a great
deal of responsibility for the ex-
tra-classroom life of the student
and his insistence on certain ob-
jectives and attitudes can create
a "spirit of approach" which will
develop the University's broad
aims, he explained.
Con-Con Delegate
To Address YR's
Constitutional convention dele-
gate Rockwell T. Gust, Jr. (R-
Grosse Pointe), will speak on Re-
publican prospects in the state
election at 7:30 p.m. tonight in
the Michigan Union at an open
meeting of the Young Republicans
club.
DIAL NO 2-6264
Friday and Saturday
at 2:00 -15:00 & 8:00
Shows Sunday thru Thursday
at 12:00- 3:00 - 6:00 & 9:00
THE
GREATEST
HUMAN
DRAMA
THE WORLD
HAS EVER
KNOWN!

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Favorite Encores cago Symphony.
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RICHTER. Beethoven
Concerto No. 1. Munch,
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Op. 54. LM/LSC.2 04

n.

F E
FROM :
RCA VICTOR .,
RED
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THIS SPECIAL COLLECTORS' RECORD
also available in regular album edition LM-2585 at $4.98*
WHEN YOU BUY ANY ONE OF THESE SIX
OUTSTANDING, NEW
RED SEAL RELEASES
OFFER ENDS FEB. 28th. ACT NOW!

I

Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Luncheon Discussion, Feb
27, noon, Guild House, 802 Monroe.
* * *
German Club: Film Festival, Johann
Strauss' operetta "Die Fledermaus' (col-
or, English subtitles), Feb. 27, 8 :0(
p.m., Multipurpose Room, Undergradu-
ate Library, followed by coffee hour in
4072 Frieze Bldg.-"Herzlich willkom-
men."
** *
German Club: Coffee Hour, Feb. 28.
2-4, 4072 Frieze Bldg. German conver-
sation, music, singing of songs, re-
freshments.-"Herzlich willkommen!"
* * *
Rifle Club, Special Business Meeting,
Wed., Feb. 28, 7:30, Range, Voting on
Constitutional Changes.
U. of M. Folk Dancers, Meeting with
instruction and dancing, Feb. 27, 7:30
p.m., Hillel, 1429 Hill St.
ULLR Ski Club, Meeting-Boyne and
Aspen Trips-Movie, Feb.. 28, 7:30, Union
* * *
Wesleyan Guild, Holy Communion
followed by breakfast, Feb. 28, 7 a.m.,
Chapel, Meth. Church.
DIAL NO 8-6416
ENDS THURSDAY
She-nvted love

.
,

I tMNICULOR(F)
Adult Weekday Matinees
Adult Evenings & Sunday
Children under 12 Years

J

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SPECIAL
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ON ABOVE PUBLICATIONS
SEND NO MONEY NOW
PUBLISHER WILL BILL YOUt

I

We are now
Delivering
PIZZA and SUBS
DOMINICKS
NO 25414

-
With Madeleine Robinson
who won the Golden
Lion Award for her performance
at the Venice Film Festival.
* FRIDAY *
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HUSTLER" IIIWOMEN"

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ADDRESS BY
CON-CON DELEGATE
ROCKWELL T. GUST, JR.
of
GROSSE POINTE

I

see: IQC-Assembly Show
preenin DUKE ELLINGTON
AND HIS NEW WORLD FAMOUS
ORCHESTRA
at: HILL AUDITORIUM
on: Saturday, MARCH 3, 1962
AlaRr
- All Seats Reserved

oft"

*'r Republican
mGraduate of U-M Law School

11

I'

I

:'f'ftii..i r................. !W!:'.!::!:a w

m

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