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February 24, 1962 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Commission Report Notes
Large Student Immigration

INDUSTRY, FOUNDATIONS:
Private FinancingSpeeds Research

(Continued from Pake 1)
other states (12,960), Canada
(664), and other foreign countries
(1,884).
"A breakdown by levels of the
three schools having the largest
out - of - state enrollments are
shown below:
"The University:
"Freshman-Sophomore, 32.8 per
cent; Junior-Senior, 27.4 per cent;
Masters, 32.9 per cent; Doctoral,
30.4 per cent; Graduate-Profes-
sional, 36 per cent. Total: 31.3 per
cent.
"Michigan Tech-Houghton:'
"Freshman-Sophomore, 26.3 per
cent; Junior-Senior, 29.2 per cent;
Masters, 34.3 per cent. Total: 27.8
per cent.
"Michigan State University:
"Freshman-Sophomore, 22.5 per
cent; Junior-Senior, 181 per cent;
Masters, 13.5 per cent; Doctoral,
8.9 per cent; Graduate-Profession-
al, 34.8 per cent. Total: 19.1 per
cent.,
"In the American Association of,
Collegiate Registrars' and Admis-
sion Officers' report Home State
Migration of Anerican College
Students, Fall 1958, a large stu-
dent migration into Michigan is
reported.
"Public Schools:
"Total enrollment: 112,426. Res-
ident Enrollment in S ate: 97,397.
Resident Enrollment Out of State:
3,859. Non-Resident Enrollment in
State: 15,029. Net Student Migra-
tion: 11,170." (Private school mi-
gration is not included in these
figures.)
Of particular note in the report
of Ferris was the statement :of
the deputy auditor general that
his 51 criticisms of that institu-
tion were due to a lack of ade-
quate record keeping at Ferris.
The deputy auditor general not-
ed, however, that there was no
evidence to substantiate the ru-
nors that funds had been misap-
propriated.
The report states, in part:
1) The . . , staff made a very
detailed and complete post audit
of the records at Ferris...
2) The ... staff spent'approxi-
mately 235 man days on the Ferris
post audit.
3) The notes on the accounting
records state in part, "We are forc-
ed to the conclusion that both
state and local fund accounting
records are in -poor condition..."
Ferris President Victor Spathelf
replied to the findings of the com-
mission regarding irregularities in
his school's records. He said, in
part:
"Part of the situation involves
the continuance through new and
not completely-oriented employes
this year, of bad practices of an
employe who is no longer with us.
An additional facet of the problem

stems from a lack of supervisory
employes,"
The report notes that improve-
ments are being made in the sit-
uation at Ferris.
The report concludes that Fer-
ris is still in need of supervisory
personnel and recommends ,the
appointment of a man with ex-
perience in auditing and account-
ing. It also hinted that a follow-
up audit at Ferris in the near-fu-
ture would be in order.
Union Group
'To Investigate
IXergyer Plan
(Continued from Page 1)
"It is something League officials
have been discussing among them-
selves and with Union personnel.
"However, there are more dif-
ferences than similarities between
the two organizations. The League
does not own its building or its
land; 'the Union is more autono-
mous.
"The best possibility for inte-
gration would be in student ac-
tivities, as a good number of our
committees already work togeth-
er," Miss Nemlaha said.)
Another motion by Olinick, to
require a referendum whenever the
Union planned new construction
necessitating the use of money de-
rived from Regental appropria-
tions, was defeated by a 12-1 mar-
gin.;
Olinick maintained that the
male students, from whose tuition
the Regents set aside an amount
used to pay off earlier bond con-
struction, should be allowed to
decide if and how their money
will be spent.,
Union Administrative Vice-Pres-
ident Michael Balgley, '62,express-
ed the majority sentiment by as-
serting that such a move would
bind the Union to a rigid course
of action which might prove eco-,
nomically unfeasible in the future.
In other matters at the board
meeting, Carder announced,that
appointments have not yet been
made to a committee to imple-
ment recommendations made by
the Facilities 'Committee last
month to overhaul and expand
Union facilities, as well as evolve
it into an all-campus organiza-
tion.'
Under the chairmanship of Ian
Hunter, '62BAd, the Bylaws Com-
mittee incorporated the structure
and policy outlines of MUSKET
into the Union bylaws, while House
Rules Committee thairman David
Baron, '62E, said that copies of
house rules would soon be posted
in conspicuous places in the Union.

By ELLEN SILVERMAN
Private investments in research
account for a tenth of the $30.5
million spent in this area last
year, James Lesch, assistant di-
rector of the Office of Research
Administration, said yesterday.
The ORA deals with two sorts
of privately financed research.
One type is sponsored by private
industry. A second is financed by
foundations. Gifts set up in ex-
pendible accounts aid research not
covered by Lesch's offiae'
"Today there is a tremendous.
source of sums available from pri-
vate foundations which no one
has fully developed," Lesch com-
mented. "There are approximately
6,000-7,000 such organizations."
Foundations primarily support
research in areas which are not
well supported by other means,
usually areas unsupported by the
federal government. The social
sciences, the arts, literature and
controversial areas regarding gov-
ernment, such as examinations of
government itself, fall into this
-ategory.
Few 'Strings'
Private foundation grants us-
ually do not have many "strings
attached." The only limitations are
University policy as sponsor foun-
dation demands are quite general.
Many groups are satisfied with
receiving only a final report and
progress reports are not often re-
quested.
There are several types of re-
search done by the University. In
one, following a research project
proposed by the University, con-
tracts are signed between it and
the sponsor who agrees to givej
money, up to a specified amount
and time.
If the project cannot be com-
pleted with the money given, the
work will be terminated or the,
sponsor may be asked to con-3
tribute more money, Lesch said.
More Reports
Generally, University research
contracts ask more reports and
are more tightly monitored thanI
the grant-letter type of research
financing. This grant stipulatesi
the amount of money to be spent,
makes few demands on the inves-
tigor.f
Industry, up to World War II,
was primarily concerned with ap-
plied research, Lesch commented.
However, more emphasis has been
given to basic research in the post-S
war era.
in industry-financed research,f
the money spent by the University
has more stipulations, as industry_
is concerned with profit-making
unlike the non-profit foundations.I
Company Monitors,
Projects are often monitored by
company officials, progress reportse
are required, and frequently pat-
ent rights are secured for thec
company.r

"The University wants to make
unique contributions to new
knowledge," Lesch said. For this
reason, projects which require the
testing of new products are not
often accepted by the University.
"However, there is an increased
recognition of the value of basic
research on the part of industry,"
*he added.
Housing Problem
A housing problem faces Univer-
sity research programs. The Uni-
versity is renting space on cam-
pus and downtown to house the
varied projects. In addition, the
building of new facilities is con-
tinuing on North Campus.
No new project can seek spon-
sorship before a space is found for
it, Lesch said.
All research at the University is
done by University personnel. Al-
though industry occasionally asks
to have its men placed in research
laboratories as training, they are
told "to send these men to school
at the University," Lesch said.
In some cases, however, when
the University has unique facili-
ties for testing not available and
industrial testing laboratories, the
University will allow industrial

personnel to work on projects as
a service.
World Travel
Although University personnel
may go around the world to col-.
lect data for their projects, the
analysis and processing of them

are usually

done here.

YD's Censure
Move To Limit
Out-State Ratio
The Young Democrats unani-
mously passed a resolution cen-
suring a proposal by Rep. William
Roman (D-Warren), who has pro-
posed a ten per cent limit on the
number of out-of-state students at
the University, Wednesday night.
The resolution said that such a
proposal "is clearly contrary to
the best interests of the academic
standards of this institution." It
opposed "any such proposal to
fix by legislative action the
ratio of out-of-state to in-state
students."

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued on Page 5)
Prog. leading to positions in the above.
Outboard Marine Corp., Marine Engrg.
Waukegan, 11.-BS: EE & ME. June &
Aug. grads. R. & D.
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., 43 Plants
in 20 States. See Co. Info. Sheet-All
Degrees: ChE, ME, Physics & Chem.
(Phys., Org. & Inorg.). BS-MS: EE, EM.
IE. BS: E Physics & Sci. Prof.: Applied
Mechanics. June & Aug. grads. Des.,
R. & D., Prod.
BSinclair Research, Inc., Harvey, Il.-
BS-MS: ChE. June & Aug. grads. Des.,
R. & D.
United States steel Corp., Locations
throughout the U.S.-All Degrees: ChE,
CE, EE, EM & IE. MS: Constru. EBS: E
Math & E Physics. U.S. & 'Venezuelan
citizens. Des., R. & D., Sales & Prod.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Equitable Life of Iowa, Detroit, Mich.
-Student Agent Plan-Junior or Sen-
ior may work part-time, ten to twelve
hrs. per week, selling life insurance.
Will receive thorough training course.
To determine if student is adapted to
sales work, he will receive comprehen-
sive testing procedure combined with
vocational interviews.
Department of the Navy-Position as
[ndustil Engineer in Admin. Dept.
Bahlrs degree & for GS-7 level re-
quire i year of professional engrg. ex-
per. in Industrial Engrg. or closely re-
ated field. (Candidates with "B" aver-
age do not need the exper.) Closing
date: March 9.
The Ladish Company, Cudahy, Wis.
-Positions as follows: For BS in ME or
Met.E.-work in modern Metallurgical
Dept. For BS in ME-work' in machine
& tool design. For BS in ME or Met.E.
-work in Sales, purchasing & super-
visory training.
New York City Civil Service - Will
employ select num. of current grads in
trainee positions in fields of urban re-
newal & planning. Trainees will be
called Housing, Planning & Redevelop-
ment Aides. Training period for one
yr. & then promotion to higher posi-
tion. Must have Bachelor's degree by
June 26.
Michigan Civil Service-Child Care
Worker. Positions primarily in Wayne
ANCHOR INN
DANCING SATURDAY
NIGHT featuring
Ray Louis Quartet
Sat Nite only
PORTAGE LAKE

County. Completion of two yrs. of edu-
cation preferably in field related to
child care. Must take written civil
service examination.
Chrysler Proving Grounds, Chelsea,
Mich.-Position as Technician for man
with 1 or 2 yrs. of Engrg. College who
for some reason must drop out of
school & work. Should be mechanically
inclined. Permanent position with ad-
vancement.
For further information, please call
General Dlv., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 Student Activities
Building, during the following hours:
Monday thru Friday 8 a.m. til 12 noon
and 1:30 til 5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring students
for part-time or full-time temporary
work, should call Bob Hodges at NO
3-1511, ext. 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
MALE
1-Graduate student, electrican engi-
neering and physics background,
knowledge of optics.
FEMALE
1-Housekeeper and baby sitter to live
in if possible. Weekends off. Room
and board plus salary.
1--Baby sitter and help during dinner
hour in exchange for room and
board.
2-Trained Keypunch Operators. 20
hours per week.
-Saleswomen for "Beauty Counselor"
cosmetics. Hours optional.
i-Experienced technical typist, math
and phoenetic symbols, 5-8 hours
per week.
1-Secretary, some experience. Five
afternoons per week.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Seminar:""The Unfolding
Drama of the Bible"; Rev. J. Edgar Ed-
wards, Coffee, Feb. 25, 9:30-10:30 a.m.,
Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Gamma Delta Lutherkn Student Club,
Swimming at the Women's pool - Re-
freshments afterwards at the chapel,
Feb. 24, 7:30, 1511 Washtenaw Ave.
* * *.
Graduate Outing Club, Hike, Feb. 25,
2:00, Rackham, Huron St. Entrance.

PERSONAL
DIAMONDS - WHOLESALE
The Largest and Finest Diamonds
at the Best Prices in area.
Robert Haack Diamond Importers
First National Bldg., Suite 504
By appointment only, NO 3-0653
Diamond mines: British Guiana, Brazil,
and venezuela
F31
LADDIE, Oh, (to be read in a modu-
lated voice with interesting overtones)
chris
P.S. I hear a nasty rumor thatmem-
berships are still available. F32
DEAR LLOYD, Bet you never thought
you'd get it from me,! The sweater,
that is (Happy Birthday)
Love, Judy P33
HAPPY BIRTHDAY Caroline. Jack Dan-
lels on the Rocks, anyone? 734
HEY, did you hear about Ken Chatters
and his escapades in Chicago? F2
J.M.H., Watch out for Saturday night.
Ruth is a wild woman. Truthfully, ch
F1
HAPPY BIRTHDAY to you, Happy
Birthday to you, Happy Birthday
dear Lee, Chuck, & B.B. Happy
Birthday to you . . WE F3
OH MY LITTLE MERVYTINE why did'
you go and hurt, your ankle. Now
you can't learn to twist, Hully Gully
or Slop. Hope it wasn't too serious
because I need my pay check. ch
F6
ONLY ONE PERSON reading this
should understand; didn't love look
ugly if that be love. P.S. A hint-good
things happened to you. "Alone"
P5
HAPPY DAYS are here again. Hurrah
for Helene. % F4
JOE, eat at Steven's Coop, good food;
share the work; save the money.
You'll like it. Dial 2-3121. Marsha. E5
STAN BABY: How did you like the'
show last night? You put, on quite
an act. 230
WANTED-grad student with car to
share bargain luxury apt. NO 2-0592.
F23
MICHIGANENSIAN
your yearbook
is now selling for..
$6.50'
LOST AND FOUND
LOST - Alternating gold and pearl
bracelet between Business Adminis-
tration Bldg. -parking lot and Michi-
gan Daily about 8 p.m. Wednesday
night. If found, call Ruth, NO 3-1561,
Ext. 923. A13.
LOST: WOMAN'S WATCH, Longine-
Wittnauer, about' a week. ago .near
Clements Library. Call Marlene Mi-
chels at NO 5-8691. Reward. A3
IT'S ABOUT a funny black knitted hat
With pigtail and a piece of green yarn
tied around it-I lost it & am very sad
since it took me 1,287 hours to knit.
If you should happen to find it, call
Chris at NO 2-3241. This is no yoke!
A15
BARGAIN CORNER
ATTENTION ROTC
OFFICERS' SHOES
Army-Navy Oxfords - $7.95
Socks 39c Shorts 690
Military Supplies
SAM'S STORE
122 E,. WASHING3TON W6

LINES
3
4

1.00

2.85

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Phone NO 2-4786

BIKES
Boys, is the cold weather keeping
you from the Hill? Ride a bike
bought from
BEAVER'S BIKE'
AND HARDWARE
605 Church NO 5-607
Z16
MISCELLANEOUS WANTED
RIDERS WANTED: Driving Seattle via
Chic. Feb. 23 P.M. All or part way.
Share expenses. No driving. NO 2-
3086, Julian. 02
FOR RENT
APARTMENT near campus. Nicely fur-
nished for three. $150 plus electricity.
Phone 662-5152. C4
FOR RENT: Garage'space or off-street
parking available two blocks south of.
East Quad. NO 8-6665 after 5P.M.
C5
606 CATHERINE--Close to campus and
hospital. Single room 3-1695. C6
ROOMS for men: No landlord on prem-
ises. 420 8. Division,,NO 5-7806 ' C3
LARGE FIVE-ROOM furnished apart-
ment. Across from Engineering Arch.
$40/month. -$1110% S.U. NO 5-6012.
C2'
WANTED: Girl to share "large, attrac-
tive, campus, apartment" with two
others. Reasonable rent. NO 5-0447.
C40
FOR RENT: Furnished apartment close
to campus. NO 2-5385. C1
ON CAMPUS nice clean 3-room furn-
ished apartment: $125 per month in-
cludes utilities. Immed. occupancy.
Call NO 2-1897 after 3. C39
WE HAVE available for the Easter holi-
days-and our annual college invasion
of Fort Lauderdale-a hotel room
with private entrance and bath. Two
double beds ,- will accommodatef 4.
$2.50 per person per night. 1 minute
from the ocean-i block of U.S. No. 1.
Get your reservations in, early. Mr.
and Mrs. Win. J. Sweet, 3000 NE
21st Terrace, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 034
CAMPUS LOCATION
Pleasant, large furnished rooms
Share kitchen. $15 per week. NO
2-7395. C37
COMPLETELY furnished one room
apartment. 813 East Kingsley. Clean
and quiet. $50. Phone NO 8-6583. 027'
APT. FOR University Personnel. Prefer
single person or couple. Quiet, refined,
beautifully decorated. Furnished or
unfurnished, $115-$135. William & ,S.
Division. Call 2-0183 days, or NO 2-
2336 evenings. C24
LOT PARKING available. Call NO 2
1443. ' 031

USED CARS
FOR SALE: Alfa Romeo Guilletta
1959. Excellent condition, receni
haul, new battery and gen
Maintained for personal use -
raced. Forced to sell at sac
Reason-unexpected long leave
area. $1875 or nearest*offer. Ca
3-0857.
'57 FAIRLANE 500. Must sell by
Like new. Many options. Wil
first offer over $750. Call 665-955
BEST OFFER over $275 for a go
Ford 6 overdrive. One owner, ex
mechanically. NO 5-~7807.
MUSiC
COMPLETE HI-FI system -
turntable-empire.108 cartridge
pre-amp. model Hif-61. Radio C
man power amplifier-C-400. E
voice speaker-95.00 or will sel
arately. 422 Hamilton, Basemen
dio (back entrance).
AUTO REPAIR
C-TED
STANDARD SERVICI
FRIENDLY SERVICE
IS OUR BUSINESS
Stop in NOW for
brake work
engine tune-up
battery and tire checl
"You expect more from
Standardand you get it."
SOUTH UNIVERSITY & FORE
No 3-9168

1 DAY 3 DAYS
701 2.45
.85 2.40,

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATI

6DAY;
3.45
4.20
4.95

IF I

Read and Use
Daily Classi ,,ieds

tI

THE
ichiganensian

ARE YOU THE
MADISON AVENUE TYPE?

1 and 2 bedroom apts.--500 yds. from Union. New,
luxurious, 'carpeted, furnished, air-conditioned, full
kitchens, parking.
AVAILABLE FOR JUNE AND SEPTEMBER
For Information call NO 3-6357 320 E. Madison
Open Saturday & Sunday Afternoons C

YOUR YEARBOOK

For
Call

Reservations
HA 6-8183

__ __ .

FOREIGN CAR SERVI
We service all makes and mo
of Foreigd and Sports Care
Lubrication $1.50
Nye Motor Sa
514 E. Washington
Phone NO 3-4858
REAL ESTATE
STUDIO, 800 sq. ft., Music, Dane
ducing, Ceramic, large assembly
33x15, 4 smaller rooms, over
Bell, 2-5 year lease. Will sell
building of 3 floors. 'Call Li
ED 7-9305.
HELP WANTED
BABY SITTER Needed: 5 days wi
erences. In home. Call NO 5-572
REGISTERED NURSE for empic
at a Coed Camp in Northern
gan. It is preferred, though not
sary, that she be single and bE
the ages of 22-30. Inquire Bruce
man at NO 2-4780 after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE
1952 PONTIAC .8, Reconditioned
dramatic, Radio, Heater, Snow
will price to sell before March
NO 8-9731.
THE NEW YORK,TIMES delivered
Student Newspaper Agency, P(
241, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
MAGAZINES: For special si
rates, call NO 2-3061 days o:
nings. Student , Periodical A
Box 1161, Ann Arbor.
DIAMONDS-Charles Reaver Co.
fering for sale estate and im
diamonds. For appointment ce
2-5685 after 6 P.M.
BUSINESS SERVICES
HEMMING-$1.75 straight skirt,
Full skirt, Call Mrs. Miller at
5465.
It's. off to Schwaben Inn we g(
No more quaddy burgers for n
HI-HO, HI-HO.
215 S. Ashley, Ann Arbor
FINDING HOLES in your wI
clothing? Find t.iat' the wind i
ties through and sends chills
and down your spine? Then
them to
WEAVE-BAC SHOP
224 Arcade NO 2-
"We'll reweave them to look like
GUITAR INSTRUCTION
Beginner and advanced. Indi
ual and small workshop gro,
Classical, folk, popular. Call
6942.
HI-FI, PHONO T', and radio
Clip this ad for free pickup an
livery. Campus Radio and TV,
Hoover. NO 5-6644.
FOUR NEW 750x14 Tires $69.95.
Batteries $11.95 & exchange. 1
Batteries -- $16.95 & exchange,
Gripsafe Atlas Tires.
at HICKEY'S
300 N. Main Phone NO 8-
A-1 New and Used. Instrumen
BANJOS. GUITARS AND BONG
Rental Purchase Plan
PArTL'SMUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-
BEFORE you buy a class ring, In
the official Michigan ring. Bur
terson' and Auld Co. 1209 Sbutt
versity, NO 8-8887.

ON SALE

NOW

for,

$6.5O

IBM,
WILL
INTERVIEW,
MARCH
7.8.9

BUY BEFORE THE PRICE RISE
See Your "House Representative
or Stop by McCoy's Card Shop

z

'1)

Candidates for Bachelor's or Master's De-
grees are invited to discuss opportunities in:
Engineering and Sales
This is a unique opportunity to find ovt about
the many career opportunities at lIK The
IBM representative can discuss with you typ-
ical jobs, various training programs, chances'
for advanced education; financial rewards,
and company benefits-all important factors
that affect your future.
SOME FACTS ABOUT IBM
An Unusual Growth Story: IBM has had one
of the exceptional growth rates in industry. It
has been a planned growth, based on ideas
and products having an almost infinite appli-
cation in our modern economy.
Diverse and Important Products: IBM devel-
ops, manufactures and markets a wide range
of products in the data processing field. IBM
computers and allied products play a vital
role in the operations of business, industry,
science, and government.
Across-the-Country Operations: Laboratory
and manufacturing facilities are located in

Endicott, Kingston, Owego, Poughkeepsie,
Vestal, Yorktown, N. Y.; Burlington, Vermont;
Lexington, Ky.; San Jose, Calif.; Bethesda,
Md.; and Rochester, Mipn. Headquarters is
located in New York. City with sales and serv-
ice offices in 180 major cities throughout the
United States.
The Accent is on the individual: No matter
what type of work a person does at IBM, he
is given all the responsibility he is able to
handle, and all the support he needs to do
his job. Advancement is by merit.
The areas in which IBM is engaged have an
unlimited future. This is your opportunity to
find out what that future has to offer you. All
qualified applicants will be considered for
employment without regard to race, creed,
color or national origin.
Your placement officer can help you to learn
more about IBM. He can give you literature
describing the many career fields at IBM. He
will arrange an appointment for you with the
IBM representative. If you cannot attend an
interview, write or call the manager of tho
nearest IBM office:

1I

Study in
Guadalajara, Mexico

/

11

.. w.r _ _ w__. __ _r_ aa_____._

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