100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 25, 1964 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LY, APRIL 25,1994

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

AC Tn~ S S ~lkii

Y, ARIL25, 964THE ICHGAN AIL

rnur. inibnC.

;;

athet Lao Announces

See African Merger
As Rebuff to Babu

BIPARTISAN SUPPORT:
Attempt To Amend Rights Bill

)pposition to

Laotian

w

Cabinet Enlargement

Promises.
Tax Review
For Rails
WASHINGTON (P)-A railroad
spokesman said yesterday Presi-
dent Lyndon B. Johnson has
promised the industry a "fair and
reasonable" review of its request
for federal tax relief following set-f
tlement of the five-year-old workt
rules dispute.
But, emphasized J. E. Wolfe,E
Johnson'sp romise was not givenr
in exchange for teh railroads' ac-i
ceptance of Wednesday's settle-
ment in the labor dispute.
Chief Negotiatort
Wolfe was chief negotiator for I
nearly 200 railroads in the Whitet
House talks that led to settle-I
ment of the dispute over jobs,I
wages and working conditions of
train operating employes.
Wolfe brought up the matter ofi
tax relief several hours before ther
railroads accepted the labor set-t
tlement drafted by federal media-t
tors, but he said his talk with
Johnson "wasn't a trade and bar-
ter session." He added:t
"I did call on the President as
reported and I did emphasize the
impact of any settlement, partic-
ularly on any railroads financiallyI
in the red or bordering on the red."i
Fair and Reasonable
Wolfe said "I did talk about taxt
relief and the President said thoset
motters were being considered andt
if the industry's proposals weret
reasonable and fair, they would
receive fair and reasonable consid-
eration."
There has been no official esti-
mate of what the work rules set-
tlement will cost either the rail-I
roads or the unions.I
Some railroad sources have esti-1
mated the package agreement will
cost the industry around $70 mil-I
lion a year in money items won
by the unions. There is no ready
estimate of how much they might
save in reduced employment.
The tax review the railroads ask-
ed involves the question of depre-
ciation on their $4-billion invest-
went in tunnels and grading.
Last Forever
The Internal Revenue ServiceI
has ruled that tunnels last forever
so they are not depreciable, and
that railroad grading is essentiallyl
land, which also is not depreciable.
Wolfe said he could not estimates
how much the railroads might save
if allowed to depreciate tunnels
and grading, but other sources saidt
the industry could save some $301
million a year.
World News
Roundup
By The Associate Press
WASAW-Sweden and Com-
munist Poland declared yesterday
in a joint communique that their
"differences in political and social
order are no obstacle" to closer
cooPeration. The Polish press
agency issued the communique
as Swedish Foreign Minister Tor-
sten Nilsson headed home after
an official visit.
moved ahead yesterday with prep-
arations for its June 2 Republi-
can presidential primary.
The United States Supreme
Court, in a 6-3 decision issued;
without comment, turned down
Harold E. Stassen's appeal for a
place on the GOP ballot.
* * ~ E

STATESVILLE, N.C.-A coron-
er's inquest within three days is'
expected to determine circum-
stances of the fatal shooting in
Statesville of a Negro insurance
man who is seeking a seat on the
Iredell County board of commis-
sioners.
* * *{
CAPE KENNEDY - The Air
Force yesterday launched a Min-
uteman missile on a successful 5,-
000-mile flight, the 12th consecu-
tive test success here for the push-
b u t t o n intercontinental range
weapon.
TUSKEGEE, Ala.-The Macon
County School Board set the stage
for another showdown over school
desegregation Thursday by reas-
signing six Negro pupils from the}
burned out Notasulga High School
to an all-Negro school at Tuske-
gee.

May Block
Government
Operations
Premiere Agrees to
Right-Wing Demands
VIENTIANE (IP)- A spokesman
for the pro-Communist Pathet Lao
opposed yesterday the demands of
a right-wing military junta for
enlarging the coalition cabinet of
neutralist Premier Prince Souvan-
na Phouma.
This came on the heels of an
announcement from Souvanna
that agreement had been reached
on the right-wing demands. It
threatened to block efforts of the
premier to put his government
back into full operation.
To Keep Control
In addition, a leader of the
junta that seized power in this ad-
ministrative capital Sunday made
clear it would not relinquish con-
trol until a government is formed
"according to our wishes." It
wants men it approves added to
the cabinet.
Souk Vongsak, secretary of state
for the Pathet Lao, declared his
group opposes any cabinet reshuf-
fle and refuses to deal with the
junta leaders.
He told a news conference that
the aim of the junta is "to sabo-
tage the policy of peace and neu-
trality in Laos" and to destroy
the coalition. He said the junta is
"illegal and the Pathet Lao does
not recognize it."
To Turn Down Demands
Souk's statement indicated a
formal turndown would come from
Prince Souphanouvong, deputy
premier and leader of the Pathet
Lao.
Souphanouvong is holed up in
his headquarters in Khang Kay
in a boycott he began against
the government 14 months ago.
Two Pathet Lao secretaries of
state attended the cabinet meeting
but they have no power to author-
ize agreement.
Gen. Kouprasith Abhay, leader
of the coup, said it is up to Sou-
vanna's coalition to handle the
problem of Pathet Lao coopera-
tion.
An avowed anti - Communist,
Kouprasith said Souvanna's cab-
inet had accepted the junta's con-
ditions. His deputy, Gen. Siho
Lamphouthakoul, made clear the
junta would remain in control of
the city until a government is
formed suitable to the officers.

LONDON (M)-British observers
yesterday saw Zanzibar's surpriset
decision to merge with Tangan-
yika as a major rebuff for the is-
land's pro-Chinese foreign minis-f
ter, Sheikh Abdul Rahman Mo-T
hammed Babu.
Over the past three months Ba-i
bu had emerged as the strong-t
man of the island's revolution. i
The decision to merge with
Tanganyika was announced whileI
he was out of the country. Some1
commentators in London speculat-
ed he may not be allowed to re-
turn.
Feuding Factionst
Recent maneuvering among the1
island's politicians suggests a feud
between rival Communist factions
may lie behind the m :ger.c
Within weeks of the JanuaryE
revolution, Communist diplomats1
in East Africa were predicting that
such a feud would soon come to3
the surface.,
According to their count, aboutc
half the island's 30-man revolu-
tionary council were "nonaligned"
African nationalists and the restt
Communists. The Communistst
were divided in allegiance betweenc
Moscow and Peking.
Babu, a former London post-I

office clerk, heads the Peking fac-
tion.
For most of the past month, Ba-
bu has been away from Zanzibar,
first at the world trade confer-
ence in Geneva and then in Indo-
nesia and Pakistan.
Pro-Soviet elements are repre-
sented at the top by Vice-Presi-
dent Kassim Hanga, who has stud-
ied in Moscow.
Hanga had a key role in orga-
nizing the merger. He was in Dar
Es Salaam for talks with Tangan-
yika's President Julius Nyerere
on Tuesday and, according to Brit-
ish authorities, presumably settled
the details of a scheme that had
been only a few days in gestation.
Talks with Sovietsf
Significantly, in the view of
diplomats here, Hanga had return-
ed recently from talks with Soviet
leaders in Moscow.,
Three hundred armed Tangan-
yikan police are in Zanzibar, avail-
able to put down any attempt to
oppose the merger by force.
The police were sent there at
Zanzibar President Abeid Kar-
ume's request soon after the Jan-
uary revolution to stop looting and
communal clashes between the Af-
ricans and the island's Arab mi-
nority.

WASHINGTON (A) - Judges
could not impose more than 30
days in jail or $300 fines without
jury trials in civil rights cases un-
der an amendment introduced in
the Senate yesterday by the Dem-
ocratic and Republican leaders.
It is similar to a provision in
the 1957 Civil Rights Bill dealing
only with voting rights discrimi-
nation. But it offers some conces-
sion. to Southern forces who want
jury-trial guarantees in all crim-
inal contempt cases-not just civil
rights-except when contempt is.
committed in court.
Dirksen Amendment
The amendment was offered by
Republican leader Everett M. Dirk-
sen of Illinois on behalf of him-
self and Sen. Mike Mansfield of
Montana, the Democratic leader,
as the civil rights debate struggled
through its 39th day.
President Lyndon B. Johnson
and Senate leaders guiding the
rights bill have called for pass-
age of the House-approved meas-
ure without change. But Dirksen

Justice Department representatives
as well as several senators.
"I trust it will be agreeable to
everybody," Dirksen added,
Mansfield' expressed hope that
the amendment can be voted on
Tuesday, in the first balloting since
the Senate took up the measure
last month. When the vote comes
will depend on the willingness of
Southern foes of the measure to
pause in their talking.
The Dirksen-Mansfield amend-
ment would limit to a $300 fine
and 30 days in jail contempt sen-
tences without a jury trial under
all injunctive provisions of the
1964 bill. And it would bring the
1957 measure into line by reduc-
ing the jail ceiling in voter rights
cases from 45 days to 30 days.
In line-with Southern argu-
ments, the amendment also would
limit penalties even in trials before
juries to a $1000 fine and impris-
onment for 6 months.
The leadership proposal was
tossed in as a substitute for one
offered by Sen. Herman Tal-
madge (G-Ga).

MIKE MANSFIELD

indicated his jury-trial proposal
has the blessing of the Justice
Department.
The GOP leader said he and{
Mansfield have discussed it with

F

SOUVANNA PHOUMA

He's Sitting Pretty
Because He Signed Up To
Sel lMichigan Dailies
Next Fall!
MAKE 25 Cents
on every
subscription
you sell!i---.
CALL JUDY
Uat 2-3241 X 32
SIGN UP NOW!

10:30 a.m. "FINDING A POINT OF REFERENCE"
CALVIN MALEFYT, speaking
7:00 p.m. "FACING OUR CONTEMPORARY
PROBLEMS"
Professor PAUL KAUPER, U-M Law School
Professor KENNETH PIKE, U-H School of Linguistics
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 East Huron (by Rackham Auditorium)
Visit the community's most contemporary church

-r

I

F

.1

COME

1g C

C H U R CH

11

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
Breakfast at Canterbury House
11:00 A.M. Morning Proyer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.

FIRST CHURCH
SCIENTIST

\4ABr4,'lA vtH

:

OF CHRIST

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
John G. Makin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:00 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
Transportation furnished for all services-
Call NO 2-2756

1 833 Washtenaw Ave.
For transportation call NO 8-7048.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 20 years of age.
i1:00 a.m. Sunday morning church service.
11:00 a.m. Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 6 years of age.
A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberty, open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p m.;
Monday evenings from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenow Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen.
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 A.M. and 12 Noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located of the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckordt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
ANDCHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Avenue
Dr. Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship Service & Communion
I 1:00 a.m. Worship Service
WEDNESDAY
7:15 p.m. Vespers

WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
668-6881
Minister-Hoover Rupert
Campus Minister-Eugene Ransom
Associate Campus Minister-Jean Robe
SUNDAY
Morning Worship at 9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-
The Revolutionary Jesus"-Rev. Ransom.
10:15 a.m.-Seminar. Christianity and Major
Religions of the World. Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Worship and Program. "Early
Development of Litrugical Music" by Har-
old Hough, Professor of Music.
TUESDAY
8:30-11:00 p.m.-Open House, Jean Robe's
apartment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in Pine Room.
6:00 p.m.--Wesley Grads. Dinner and Pro-
gram. Report on Washington Seminar on
Race Relations, Jerry Cross, Wesley Foun-
dation Director at Eastern Michigan Uni-
versity.
FRIDAY
5:30 p.m.-Young Marrieds, Picnic at Is-
land Park. Meet at church at 5:30. Please
phone in reservations to NO 8-6881.
BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Kloudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Church School.
7:00 p.m. Student Guild.

ORIENT BOUND THIS SUMMER? Whether you
are returning home or visiting the Orient for
the first time, Japan Air Lines will enhance
your trip. Your JAL hostess, charming in
kimono, makes you serenely at home amid
classic Japanese surroundings aboard your DC-8
Jet Courier. = In Economy or First Class, JAL offers
you warmly personal service unique in jet travel.
And remember, all jet fares are the same: It costs no
more to fly JAL and transform your jet flight into a
travel experience unique in all thi world.

al

to your Orient trip

Now Daily DC-8 Jet Courier Flights to Tokyo
from Los Angeles or San Francisco via Hawaii
-where you may stop over at no extra fare.
Excellent JAL connections are available at
Tokyo to all the Orient, and now on to Europe.
See your travel agent or
JAPAN
AIR
LINES

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
1501 West Liberty Street
Ralph 8. Piper, David urocklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors
Worship Services-8:30 and 11 :00 a.m.

I

11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan