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April 14, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-04-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.I

THE MICHIGAN IMAYI.V

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.. au 1 aa aV L ~UNL N N A... UESD~JAY,

APRIL 14, 1964

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T

Impressionism

Direct Aid to Northern Negro

IMPORTANT MEDIUM:
Baez Sees Benefits in Folk Music Fad

J-- ..

Joyce Sees Rise
In Rights Action
By JEROME HINIKER
"This summer should bring an
intensification of civil rights dem-
onstrations; the oppressed Negro,
himself will take a more active
part in protesting his situation,"
Frank Joyce, former Wayne State
University student and national
chairman of the'Northern Student
Movement congress, said in an in-
terview with The Daily yesterday.
Joyce also thinks it is very pos-
sible that the Negro community
will be urged to boycott the No-
vember election unless the Demo-
cratic party purges itself of racists.
The NSM was formed in 1961,
basically as a tutorial program for
northern underprivileged Negro
youths; however, since then it has
broadened itselfand engaged in
many forms of civil rights activi-
ties.
The NSM has played a key role
in the Harlem rent strikes, worked
in school boycotts in Boston and
Chicago and created a variety of
local protest movements in all
cities in which it has a chapter.
The NSM differs from other
civil rights groups in two ways. It
works primarily in assisting the
Northern Negro who Joyce says is
"equally but much more subtlely
discriminated against than is his
southern counterpart." The NSM
is the' only rights group which
does not desire to take an active
part in racial demonstrations.

JOE CHABOT

FRANK JOYCE

A cross

0

Campus,
Prof. Theodore W. Schultz of the
University of Chicago will give the
second Cook Lecture on "Tradi-
tional Agriculture" at 4:15 p.m. to-:
day in Rackham Aud.
Bible Study.. .
Prof. Harry M. Orlinsky of the
Hebrew Union College will speak
on "Two Millennia of Bible Trans-
lations: Their Historical Back-
ground" at 4:10 p.m. today in
Aud. B.
Sociology...
Prof. Lloyd Ohlin of Columbia
University will speak on "Recent
Resolutions on Delinquent Sub-
cultures" at 4:15 p.m. today in
Aud. C.
Lamprey Control.. .
Leo F. Erkkila of the U.S. Bu-
reau of Commercial Fisheries will
speak on "Sea Lamprey Control
in the Great Lakes" at 8 p.m. to-
day in the East Conference Room
of Rackham.

"The aim of the NSM is not to
take a lead in demonstrations, but
to instill in the Negro himself the
desire and ability to articulate his
needs and to eradicate discrimina-
tion and poverty from his own
city," Joyce said.
Joyce, who has been in Ann
Arbor at the Center for Conflict
Resolution to participate - in a
Conference on Community Move-
ments and Economic Issues," feels
that the greatest accomplishment
of his organization is that its
nearly 2000 members are now very
aware of the exact.problems of the
Negro.
"Certainly the NSM has helped
make a number of concrete im-
provements in the status of the.
Negro, however the most worth-
while thing we have gained thus
far has been a working experience
in the Negro ghettos which will be
of invaluable importance in the
long battle for the rights of the
Negro," Joyce said.
'U'. Student 'in
Boat Accident{
University student James Wag-
ner, '66E, drowned Sunday when;
his 16-foot sailboat was overturn-
ed in Base Line Lake, near How-
ell, in Livingston County.
Skindivers have as yet failed to
recover the body of 21-year-old
Wagner, who lived at 22928 Bea-
consfield, East Detroit.

-National Gallery of Art
LA TOILETTE, a color print in dry paint and aquatint, by 19th
century impressionistic aatist Mary Cassatt is part of a display
of 30 prints and two preparatory drawings by Miss Cassatt cur-
rently on display in the UGLI.
FOR NEW STUDENTS:
Orientation Leaders Set
For Work in Summer

By ROBERTA POLLACK
Special To The Daily
DETROIT - "I want to com-
municating with people and I do it
by singing."
And Joan Baez, in her perform-
ance at Masonic Temple on Sun-
day night gave proof of this abil-
ity to communicate. Her folk
songs, in fact, were direct reflec-
tions of viewpoints she had ex-
pressed during an interview held
just prior to the performance.
Miss Baez acknowledged the
relatively new trend in folk
music that has svept across col-
lege campuses. In her inimitably
honest fashion she admitted that
the resulting commercialized songs
"do their job in spite of them-
selves by attracting people who
otherwise would never have been
exposed to folk music-."
Miss Baez feels that the impor-
tance of folk music, particularly
in relation to the civil rights
movement, is immeasurable. "This
was the only means of expression
left open to the Negro. Today, it
is the primary means of expres-
sion for the civil. rights move-
ment. It attracts people, it in-
spires people."
Camp Followers
The major disadvantage, added
Miss Baez in her unpretentious
manner, 'is that you attract in-
dividuals who are just following
the group. They haven't done any
self-analysis to understand why
they want to participate. These
are people, who, once the group
is taken away, are left hanging.
They're not individuals."
She claimed that the most de-
sirable qualities for a good protest.
song are a beautiful tune and
words that mean something-not
just repetitions of words. Among
her favorites, she listed "Blowing
in the Wind" and "We Shall
Overcome."
oiss Baez is particularly ena-
moured of the works of Bob Dy-
lan. Sunday night she cleverly in-
troduced two new Dylan songs
that referred to Byron de la
Beckwith's trial in Mississippi.
"People have asked me if I've
traveled abroad recently. And I
just repetitions of words. Among
turned from Mississippi where I
listened to the Beckwith trial pro-
ceedings. That's not another
country-it's another planet."
SPECIAL
SATURDAY MATINEE
FOR ROMANOFF & JULIET
SAVES AD WRITER
Imagine an ad writer with noth-
ing to write about. Horrible
thought, isn't it?
You can imagine how terrible our
copywriter felt when we told him
ROMANOFF & JULIET was al-
most sold out even before he wrote
a single ad.
He cried.
Well, we had to do something so
we arranged a Special Saturday
Matinee at 2 p.m.-April 18-
with all seats reserved for only
$1.50. It gave him something to
write about.
He smiled. We think we pre-
vented a suicide. The human
thing to do, of course.
So make him think it is all worth
while. See ROMANOFF & JULIET
at the special matinee, 2 p.m.,
Sat., Apr. 18-$ 150. Tickets also
available for Thurs., Apr. 16, 8
p.m.-$1.50 and Sat., Apr. 18, 8
p.m.--$1.75. All seats reserved.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
THEATRE

An Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
!Production

JOAN BAEZ
rights movement. College students
play a significant role in this
movement, a much greater role
than they realize. Not only in at-
titude, but even in legislative pro-
cesses of the country their influ-
ence can be felt." She cited as a
specific example the work that
SNCC is doing and planning for
this summer.
A point of particular interest

The first song, the- "Percy
Song" was a ballad of a man who
had 'no strings to pull" and so
was sentenced to an unjustly long
prison term.
The recent problems in Birm-
ingham were not overlooked. In
stirring and sad tone "Birming-
ham Sunday" revealed h o w
"blood ran like wine and the choir
kept singing of freedom'? as foir
young girls were shot.
Miss Baez, when asked, replied,
that "I do what I can for the civil

DIAL Shows at
5+6290 1, 3,5,
7 and 9:05 P.M.

has been Miss Baez's attitude to-
ward television. "I can't stand it.
Everything is fake. Everything
they say is false and pretentious."
God's Ours
Miss Baez is now patiently, and
somewhat curiously waiting to see
what action the United States
government will take. Once again,
her attitude was reflected in the
repertoire of Sunday evening. In
one pacifist song in which she
traced American wars from the
Indian wars to the Second World
War, she used the old American
stand-by, "God is on our side."
But she concluded if "God is on
our side, He'll stop the next war."
When asked how her pacifist
attitude merged into civil rights
feelings, Miss Baez replied that as
one theory crystallized, others
arose and they too crystallized.
Probably one of the most appeal-
ing aspects of Miss Baez is her
very calm and' yet very sincere
attitude regarding these move-
ments. She does not become fan-
atical. Instead, as she said, "I do
what I can."
Avoided People
Miss Baez is a true performer.
"I started singing, but when I did,
I avoided people. If they didn't
like me, they didn't have to hear
me. You know"-she; expressive-
ly stuck out her tongue and grin-
ned-'"But then I realized that I
did want, to communicate with
people. And, well, to be honest,
I like being in the limelight. Ever
since I was one or two years old,
I'd dance"-again an expressive
arm-flinging gesture - "around
and sing, just to be the center of
attention."
And Miss Baez will undoubtedly
remain the center of attention for
many years to come. This very
beautiful young woman is plan-.
ning to make another record late
in May, a record of "Bobby Dy-
Ian's song."

''

r,.,

The University Services Com-
mittee of the, Women's League and
the Michigan Union announced
recently the selection of the orien-
tation candidates for the fall se-
mester, 1964.
Students who did not serve as
orientation leaders in previous se-
mesters are required to attend the
Leader Training Workshop ,on
Tuesday, April 21, at 7 p.m., on
the third floor of the Michigan
Union. -Former leaders will receive
instructions from the Orientation
Office in mid-July.
The former leaders who have
been selected include:
Barbara Airmet, '65; David Allor, '66;
Sharon Andrews, '65; Carolyn Bent,
'66; Harvey Braunstein; '65; Lee Brom-
berg, '65; Marilyn Chasteen, '65; Gary
Chernay, '65; Bruce Chudacoff, '66; Al
Craft, Grad;, Laning Davidson, '66;
Cheryl Dodge, '65; Richard Esposito,
'65; Jeffrey Fortune, '65; Roslyn Fried-
laender, '65; Pauline Furniss, '66; Shar-
on Gaines, '66; Andree Garner, '65;
Paris Genalis, Grad; Gary Gerlach, '66;
Gerald Grijak, '66; Michael Hannum,
'66; Phyllis Hart, '65; Edward Hlavac,
'65; Ellen Isaacson, '65; Bargara Jen-
nings, '66; Sandra Johnson, '65.
Also, John Josselson, '66; Myrna Ka-
sey, '66; Sylvia Kasey, '65; Rachelle
Kraft, '65; Arthur Lennox, '66; Ed-
ward Malinak, '65; Elody Mondo, '65;

Candyce Patterson, '66; Mark Phillips,
'65; Lana Pleskacz, '65; Nicholas Pisor,
'67; Alan Rogers, Grad; William Sal-
ow, '66; Allen Solomon, '65; Janet Tee-
ple, '65; Joanne Temple, '65; r Nancy
Tempue, '66; Terry Thall, '65; Jose-
phine Thompson, '66; Mary Van de
Water, '65; Kenneth Vatz, '65; Diet-
mar Wagner, '66; Martha Welling, '65;
Kirk Wheeler, '65; Linda Yee, '66.
The office staff includes Joan Deutsch,
'65, and Stephen Straight, '66.
The new leaders chosen by the League
and the Union are listed by discussion
group as follows:
Discussion group one, meeting in
Room 3K, includes: Harriet Adler, '66;
Sigfrid Allen, '67; Marsha Bellman,
'65; Jack Blumenthall, '65; James
Boughey, '65; Jo-Anne Bowerman, '67;
Harriet Bridges, '65; Cheryl Broome,
'66; Michael Duhl, '66; Jacqueline Fell-
man, '66; Mary Ellen Foss, '65; Peggy
Friedman, '67; Mary Hunt, '67; Miriam
Lang, '67.
Discussion group two, meeting in
Room 3L, includes: Garlene Boone, '65;
Cheryl Cahn, '65; Susan Deutch, '66;
Barbara Goodfriend, '65; Susan Jacob-
son, '64; Stephen Landau, '66; Kathleen
List, '66; Edward Lystra, '65; Ennd
Magidson, '66; Beth Mattson, '65; Carol
Mersereau,''66; John Miles, '65; Stuart
Mitnick, '67; Jane Moy, '66; Joseph
Nelson, '65; Carol Nuttall, '65: Michael
Sattinger, '65; Ronald Serlin, '66.
Discussion group three, meeting. in
Room 3M, includes: Richard Buell, '65;
(Continued from Page 2)

"A BRILLIANT PICTURE, NOT TO BE MISSED!"
-Hugh Holland, Michigan Daily
Peter Sellers" George C. Scott
Stanley Kubrick's
r r.trangeovea
Or How I Learned To Stop Worrying
And Love The Bomb
- -4

' <
s
,
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"'ter
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the hot-line suspense comedy ;

Dial 2-6264 ' ENDS TODAY
YUL BRYNNER
£ 9"KINGS OF
THE S1

UN"

ENCORE ENGAGEMENT

STARTING WEDNESDAY

ri COCERT AZZ"
V V
April 19...7:00 P.M.
Union Ballroomn
Y
1) Uof M Jazz Band
2) Clarence Byrd Trio
3) Richard Lowenthal QuartetU
UNION SPONSORED 50c Admission
I)? 0'<0<' > -== "<==>0<=> 0= ,.<1>O C

Dial 8-6416
ENDING WEDNESDAY
"'THE SILENCE' is an aston-
ishing and memorable collection
of vividly presented images, inci-
dents, episodes, spiked with erotic
symbols and elliptical dialogue."
-Cue Magazine
Starting Thursday
The Award Winning
"FELLINI 8%"

.J~qU~ FILIV~ P~ZN I

"BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR!"
"EWW ACTORI" Albert Finney
"BEST DIRECTORI"Tony Richardson
-New York film Critics Award.
"A ROARING ENTERTAINMENT!"'' ;
"THE BEST COMEDY. EVER MADE... AN ABSO-
LUTE TRIUMPH!" '-N. .
"BRILLIANTLY ENTERTAINING. IT LEAVES AN
AUDIENCE STUNNED WITH JOY.N.Y. V/,d';t*omsuo
"* * * (HIGHEST RATINGI) DELECTABLE."
-Cte Comeo.". N.Y. otty News
"ABSOLUTELY MAGNIFICENT!" --Time.Magaziee
UASTMANCOLOR* AiImTo AiSTI.'L OPETEASE

INGMAR BERGMAN'S
THESI1 (

rr

THREE YEARS AFTER THE BAR MITZVAH.. I

BROTHER
DAVE GARDNER

IN PERSON AT

it

I

11

ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY
(1948-1964)
A brief talk by Lt. Commander Herzl Lavon of
the Israeli Navy will be followed by Israeli folk
dancing by the Nagila Dancers. The audience
.7 . .. . 7. . _ 1 7 1 1 ._4_ .._ 1# - -

MASONIC AUDITORIUM
Sat., Apr. 18, 8:30 p.m.
One Performance Only !
You saw Brother Dave Gardner
on the Jack Parr "Tonight" show
. times!
Other "think" comedians milk
Our sacred cows . . Brother
Dave Gardner leads them to the
slaughter house.
Bob Hope says: "Dave is one of the

11

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