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March 10, 1964 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-03-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

luarreling Reds
o Settle Dispute
Russia, Red China Begin Discussions

Observes
Viet Nam
Progress

Killingsworth Offers Definition of Automation

Of Alleged Borde
NEW DELHI (1P)-Feuding Red
up a joint commission to settle
a visiting Soviet official reporte
Last fall, the Soviet Union char
rng its border and trying to seize
Peking in turn accused the Sov
t in Red China's far northwest

HAROLD WILSON.

ViolaionsRevo HOA HCAO, Viet Nam W-P-Sec-
r Violations, Revo lt retary of Defense Robert .S. mC
Namara helicoptered around South
I China and the Soviet Union have Viet Nam's Mekong River delta
disputed areas on their long fron- yesterday and said he saw prog-
d here yesterday. ress being made.,
ged Red Chinese soldiers were vio- With Vietnamese Premier Maj.
e chnksof Rssin sil.gen. Nguyen Khanh at his, side,
chunks of Russian soil. cNamara spoke in three places.
viet Union of trying to foment re- Each time he was cheered and
province of Sinkiang and warned greeted enthusiastically.:
that such action had brought re- He promised that the United
lations between the two Commun- States would see the war, against
ist powers to "the brink of a split." the Communist Viet Cong guerril-
Announces Commission las through to victory for South
The report that the joint con- Viet Nam and called on the peo-
mission had been established was Ae . to give their full support to
made by Ivan Vasilevich Spiridon- Khanh.
ov, chairman of the Supreme Un- Later, riding with a reporter in
ion of the Soviets, one of the two a small three-wheeled scooter con-
houses of parliament. He is also veyance, McNamara said he not-
chairman of a 10-member Soviet ed progress in the countryside since
parliamentary delegation to India. since he visited in December.
Spiridbnov told a news confer- He credited Khanh's efforts to
ence that commission began dis- bring order out of the chaos in
cussions after he left for India the Vietnamese government since
and he does not know how it is the overthrow and slaying of
getting along. He did not specify President Ngo Dinh Diem Nov. 1-2.
whether it was meeting in Moscow McNamara declined comment on
or Peking. speculation that the United States
He said the commission was may be considering carrying the
agreed upon after the Soviet Un- war to Communist North Viet
ion protested to Peking against Nam, but said:
Chinese border violations. Its pur- "I think the thing to concen-
pose is .to "work out and delimit trate on is winning the war down
certain parts of the border," he here. One thing you can be sure
added. of-we intend to continue our sup-
A Soviet Communist party port for Viet Nam. The first thing
statement last September said Red is to overcome the insurgency in
Chinese servicemen and civilians South Viet Nam.
had violated the border thousands He noted that the United States
of times since 1960, were still vio- will continue to supply military
lating it and that Peking had ig- and economic aid.
nored repeated offers to hold con- Speaking of Khanh, McNamara
sultations on disputed areas. said: "He has our great admira-
Khrushchev's Idea tion and respect, and our full sup-
The offer to set up the joint port. ?
commission was based on Premier
Nikita Khrushchev's view - ex- N .... .. to -
pressed at the new year -,that .g a e
territorial disputes should be set-
tied by peaceful means, Spiridonov
said; FirstPrimary
Another member of .the Soviet
delegation indicated the Soviet CONCORD (A) - New Hamp-
Union had done something about shire's first in the nation presi-
Peking's complaint that thousands dential primary today will measure
of Chinese from Sinkiang were support for candidates Sen. Barry
crossing the border to the Soviet Goldwater (R-Ariz), Gov. Nelson
Union. Rockefeller of New York, Sen.
The "massive flow" of people Margaret Chase Smith (R-Maine),
from Sinkiang has now halted, Harold E. Stassen, and Norman
said Bolot Mambetov, chairman of Lepage, a Nashua accountant, in
the Council of Ministers of the Republican presidential prefer-
Kirgiz Soviet Republic, on Sin- ences.
kiang's western border. In addition, heavy write-in votes
Mambetov said the people left are expected in, the GOP primary
because "of the very difficult sit- for Henry Cabot.Lodge and former
uation in Sinkiang." The Russians Vice-President Richard M. Nixon.
previously have said the people On the Democratic side, write-
were Moslems who fled from Sin- ins are expected for President
kiang because of religious perse- Lyndon B. Johnson and Atty. Gen.
cution. Robert Kennedy for Vice-Presi-
Peking broadcasts in September dent.
charged the Chinese had been No Democratic presidential pref-
lured across the border. erences are sought.

(Second in a fie-part series on
(automation)
By JULES LOH
NEW YORK-It is important to
know exactly what automation is
and how it differs in nature from
other technological advances, in-
cluding those of the 19th ,Century
industrial revolution.
Prof. Charles C. Killingsworth
of Michigan State University de-
fines it as "mechanization of sen-
sory, control and thought process-
es." He offers as a rudimentary
example the ordinary household
thermostat.
This gadget makes a continuous
analysis, as it were, of room tem-
perature and decides when to send

a signal to the furnace to turn it-
self on and off. All the operator
has to do is "instruct" the thermo-
stat, that is, set a simple control
for a desired result.
Punch Card
In a complex automated system
the instructions are contained on
a punched card or tape or other
device.
Thus a plant in Cleveland can
produce 200 cubic yards of ready
mixed concrete an hour with no
human labor at all-just someone
to select the punched card for the
right mixture and amount and
push the button. _ .
"It appears possible," says Prof.
Edward B. Shils of the University
of Pennsylvania's Wharton School

Johnson Announces Program
To Cut Employment Figures

"that almost any physical process
controllable by man can be made
to control itself."
Another significant feature of
automation is that machines, per-
forming tasks beyond the capacity
of mere humans, now can do jobs
which heretofore were impractical;
if not impossible.
Last summer a computer was
installed in the Toronto City Hall.
It receives continuous traffic in-'
formation from 2000 underground
sensors spotted throughout the
city, analyzes the data many times'
a second, and sends corrective sig-
nals to traffic lights at 1000 in-
tersections. No combination of
human effort could match the
performance.

World ,Newsl
Roundup
By The Associated Press
LONDON-The Labor Party will
cancel Britain's agreement to build
its own Polaris-missile submarines
if it wins power in this year's elec-
tion, party leader Harold Wilson
said last night.
The chief of the opposition to
the conservative govprnment said
Britain's plans to "buy or hire"
Polaris submarines adds nothing
to Western defense capabilities.
NICOSIA-Greek and Turkish
Cypriots battled with armored
bulldozers, mortars and bazookas
in Ktima yesterday, ignoring Unit-
ed Nations efforts to secure a
lasting cease-fire in the flaming
west coast city.
After 12 hours of brutal fighting,
surrounded Turks appeared on the
point of surrender, a British
army spokesman said. However, a
Turkish spokesman declared they
would never surrender.
NEW YORK-The stock market
encountered a wave of profit tak-
ing yesterday but had enough buy-
ing power to overcome it and wind
up with another gain by a narrow
margin. The final Dow Jones av-
erages had 30 industrials up 1.15,
20 rails down .19, 15 utilities
down .24. and 65 stocks up .07.

WASHINGTON (R) - President
Lyndon B. Johnson announced
yesterday a national manpower
policy designed to slash, high un-
employment and prepare all Amer-
Favor Hannah
For Senator
DETROIT ()--The Detroit News
said yesterday a poll shows that,
Michigan State University Presi-
dent John A. Hannah towers above
all others seriously mentioned as
possible Republican candidate for
United States senator in Michi-1
gan this year.
Hannah has said, however, he
is not a candidate and will op-
pose any attempts to draft him.
The poll was conducted for the
News by a private opinion research'
company. The results indicate that
Hannah would take 45.9 per cent of
the vote in afour-way primary.
John B. Martin, Republican na-
tional committeeman, would get 34
per cent; James E. O'Neil, State
Board of Education member, -9.1
per cent, and Ewdard A. Meany,
Grand Haven businessman, 11 per
cent.

icans for better job opportunities.
Johnson called on Congress and
the nation to help make the policy
work by meshing the needs of the
work force with basic educational,
economic, scientific, health and so-
cial welfare programs.
"We must seek to develop more
completely our people's talents and
to employ those talents fully,":
Johnson said.
Active Manpower
"'There must,i n brief, be an ac-
tive manpower policy--to comple-
ment our new national attack on
poverty," he said.
Johnson's first manpower report
to Congress noted that more Amer-
icans than ever before held jobs,
"but unemployment p e r s i s t e d
grimly despite 1963's strong eco-
nomic advance."
Noting that unemployment av-
eraged 4.2 million over the past
year, Johnson said:
"Such a waste of our human re-
sources and loss of potential pro-
duction cannot be tolerated."
' . Education Need
'Johnson placed heavy emphasis
on the need for education to give
both young and older workers more
and better opportunities for jobs.
"Let us not shortchange our fu-

The Harvard Computation Lab-
oratory put a computer to work
five years ago comparing nearly
5000 ancient Biblical manuscripts
to find out which were copies of
the same original text. It would
have taken scholars literally hun-
dreds of years to do the job un-
aided.
Seek Price-Fixers
The Justice Department is using
a computer to seek patterns of
similarity in thousands of bids
submitted at all levels of govern-
ment in an effort to spot price
rigging. Human detectives would
find the amount of paperwork
utterly unmanageable.
Catching swindlers and advanc-
ing Biblical research may be un-
tarnished benefits, but there is no
avoiding the fact that 'this new
wave of change also has a cruel'
undertow. Automation eliminates
.jobs. And it is eliminating them
at a time when the work force is
mushrooming as never before.
Although' automation's toll has
been heaviest in basic manufac-
turing-where job security has re-
placed wag'es as the number one
item in labor contract bargaining
--the erosion doesn't stop there.
Machines also are cutting an ever
widening swath through the ser-
vice industries, clerical ranks, even
middle management executive jobs.
Many managers are hired to
recommend actions based on accu-
rate perception of data according.
to a given set of rules-decision
making. A computer, with its in-
fallible memory of an almost lim-
itless number of ,facts, is far more
reliable and much faster.
Change Job
A management service company
studied the effects of office auto-
mation and concluded:
"Computers will affect the na-
ture of the manager's job, and
th~ey. will have' fundamental, im-
pact on how strategic business de-
-cisions are made and plans de-
veloped." The machine, it said, is
destined to become "an integral
part of the decision making and
operating. apparatus of a business."
Actually the trend already has

ture," he said, noting the rapid
rise in the number of youths en-.
tering the labor market and their;
extremely high jobless rate.
Johnson mentioned the impact
of automation on employment anda
asked Congress to set up a national
commission to study it. He also an-
nounced that his own advisory3
committee on labor-management
policy will begin a similar studyI
of the impact of automation onI
workers and industry.
He said he is also creating a
presidential committee on man-
power to make a continuing study
of manpower resources and needs.
He asked Congress to enact al-'
ready pending measures affecting
youth unemployment, federal aid
to education, area redevelopment,
a study to see if_ overtime can
be reduced to spread jobs, civil,
rights measures to help minority
groups find better job opportuni-
ties, expanded coverage under the
federal minimum wage law and c
increased' unemployment, benefits.

rr

r-~-- -= - - -- -=-- C

iii

HELEN SIEGL

Woodcuts
FEORSYT]H]E GALLERY

, 201 Nickels Arcade'
Weekdays 10-4 NO 3-0918

Ann Arbor
Saturdays 10-1

.

.r

"--

Located in Campus Village to serve Michigan coeds,
Marilyn Mark's gives you complete hair care. For that
special occasion . . . as well as day-by-day loveliness
... call Marilyn Mark's today.
HAIR STYLISTS
548 Church St /Phone 662-5683/Huron Towers/ Phone 662-5685

A Cordial Invitation Is Extended to Hear
THE HON. YAACOV SHIMONI

"I

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2 k
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Director, Asian Affairs,
Israeli Ministry for Foreign Affairs
Monday, Mprch 16, at 8 P.M.
on
"ISRAEL AND THE NEWLY
DEVELOPING COUNTRIES OF
ASIA AND AFRICA"
ling-Cohn Hall 1429 Hill St.

--------

a ,k

i-m -

Zwerdl

I

The Michgdn Russian Circle

'I'~I

presents

lk

Prof. Leonard Rowe,
Department of Political Science,
speaking on a topic of vital interest

"PROBLEMS IN SOVIET POLITICS

I

IU iB'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
jg 11429 Hill St.
i "t Announces"
i PASSOVER LUNCH AND DINNER
March 31 to April 4, 1964 -
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
I
U
I
AND USE THIS FORM AS YOUR RESERVATION
S Hillel Members Non-Members
in good standing and Guests
Special Package Rate for all 10 meals $16.65 $20.25
* Each Lunch 1.40 1.75
* Each Dinner 2.30 2.75
I
Enclised is my check appropriate box)
i money order ElcT
drawn to "B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation Trust Account" for $
" to cover the following meals: (BE SURE TO SPECIFY)
~]ALL 10 MEALS
LUNCH DINNER
* Tuesday, March 31 E Tuesday, March 31
ElQWednesday, April 1 E Wednesday, April 1
* QjThursday, April 2 E Thursday, April 2
I ®lFriday, April 3 Q Friday, April 3
Er1Saturday, April 4 M Saturday, April 4
U
£ NAME-Type or Print
* last name . first middle
* CAMPUS ADDRESS Phone__ _
I
NOTE
1. Make your reservation now.
*' 2. Payment in full must be made at the time of reservation.
3. There will be no cancellations or refunds:
U
1 D ..,..s ..U..i .. #.. ..J~sowfn.4.^ &rr r rt L,

AND SOCIETY"

m
l1w

Tues., March 10, 2065 Frieze Building
7:30 P.M.

Something of 'extraordinary,
presence ... almost hypnotic
power. On a weighty decorator
cotton, convoluted flowers-
within-flowers and leaves-
within-leaves involve themselves
in a moody steel-engraving
effect. Rather like "Green
Mansions" illustrated by
Gustave Dore. The pouf shaping
allows it to flow unchecked.
Gold, Blue, Olive. Sizes 6 to 16.
19.98

..

00 .
- --

Be in Command
of Every Situation

we have

Cards.

Gifts and

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