100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 01, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWOl

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

.TENn MAREC ,1.

THE MIC IG N IOT V tLEI V MAY1CPl

i ,

ARTS AND LETTERS:
Stokowski Views Conductors

THIS WEEK'S

EVENTS

n

By JEFFREY K. CHASE
Upon meeting Leopold Stokowski
one is immediately awed by the
stateliness and air of self-assur-
ance which the man conveys.
His many assignments as an or-
chestral conductor make him a
qualified person to discuss the
requisites of his profession.
"The conductor must have cer-
tain characteristics -- a certain
kind of dedication, and certain in-
nate talents-which are somewhat
rare," Stokowski began, in his de-
liberate, authoritative manner.
Education'
"His education must be a good
one both musically and generally,
speaking," he maintained, "be-
cause in back 'of everything he
does should be a cultural perspec-
tive and an awareness of every-
thing he has received from his
ancestors.
"The genes from thousands of
ancestors go into all of us and
their balance and intensity are
very important."
He explained that in addition
the conductor must understand
the nature of all the instruments:
what they like todo, what they
cannot at all do, and what they
can do only with difficulty because
it is against their nature.
Play Instruments
"In my opinion, the conductor
should play all the instruments.
He may not play them all well,
because one lifetime is not suffi-
ciently long for this, but he+
should know their character and
willingness," Stokowski elaborated.
He continued, "The conductor
should, of course, know the score
well and should know how to beat
time.'These two things hundreds
of people can do, but there are

LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI
not hundreds of good conductors
all the same. These are funda-
mental requisites; there are oth-
er things equally as important."
I Psychology
Stokowski added, "The conduc-
tor must understand the psycho-
logical nature of the players. And
here American orchestras are
unique. In Europe, an orchestra is
composed, by and large, of play-
ers of only one nationality-that
of the resident country. But in
America, orchestras are compos-
ed of players from all nations,
and the cultural differences among
the players make conducting an
American orchestra psychological-
ly difficult."
Stokowski called the other abil-
ity the conductor must have "X,"
for lack of a better term. It is

the means by which some con-
ductors can make the music come
alive, how only some can convey
the ideas of the composer to the
listeners. "This is the most dif-
ficult task," he maintained.
Expression
"It is not enough to conduct the
correct noteshonly; the conductor
must make the notes express the
spirit and mood of the music,"
Stokowski noted.
"Many play correctly, but the
spirit is weak, 'The letter kills;
bhe spirit brings life.' Nothing could
be more true of a really great
conductor and a really great or-
chestra."
IHed-Studlents
Wint Aid Grant
The University's Medical School
received $52,216 last Thursday
through the Michigan State Med-
ical Society.
The money is from two differ-
ent sources: $38,326 comes from
$10 contributions of members of
the State Medical group, and the
remaining $13,890 from the Ame-
rican Medical AssociationhEduca-
tion and Research Foundation.
Wayne State University received
$31,988 from the same group. The
money given by the State Medical
Society is used to "aid medical
students" and is divided between
the two schools on a per capita
basis. The AMA funds may be
used as the schools wish.
Dr. Orlen J. Johnson of Bay
City, MSMS president, will pre-
sent the checks to medical school
representatives in Lansing.

TODAY of Washington State University as a part of International
3 p.m.-The University of Illi- will speak on "Photoperiodic Mech- at Jordan Hall.

nois Contemporary Chamber En-
semble, directed by Jack McKen-
zie, will be featured at the ONCE
Festival of Contemporary Music in
the VFW Ballroom.
5:30-8:30 p.m. - The Interna-
tional Students Association will
hold an International Peace Meal
as the opening feature of Inter-
national Week, at the Michigan
League. The meal will feature
speaker, Alex Korns, vice-presi-
dent of USNSA. '
7. p.m.-There will be an all
campus S t u d e n t Government
Council Forum in which candi-
dates in the upcoming election will
speak out at the Michigan Union
Ballroom.
8:30 p.m.-The Bob James Mod-
ern Jazz Trio and saxophonist
Eric Dolphy will perform at the
ONCE Festival of Contemporary
Music in the VFW Ballroom.
MONDAY, MARCH 2
8:30 p.m.-A joint address by
G. Mennen Williams, assistant sec-
retary of State for African affairs
and S.nO. Adebo, head of Nigerian
Mission to the United Nations as
a part of International Week will
be sponsored by the International
Students Association. Williams
will speak on ."The Student in
Africa" and Adebo on "The Re-
sponsibilities of Students in Af-
rica," in Rackham Aud.
4 p.m.--Prof. Rene Millon of the
University of Rochester will speak
on "Archeology of Teotihuacan:
Prehistoric Capital of Mexico," in
Aud. B.
TUESDAY, MARCH 3
4 p.m.-Prof. Donald S. Farner

ansims in Birds" in Rm. 1400 of
the Chemistry Bldg.
4:10 p.m.-Sir Gordon Suther-
land, idrector of the Natioanl
Physical Laboratory in England,
will speak on "A Scientist's Jour-
ney to CommunistChina" in Aud.
A.
7:30 p.m.-Prof. Henry Bretton
of the political science department
will speak on Nigeria, as a part
of International Week in the Mul-
tipurpose Room of the UGLI.
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present John
EIersey's "The Child Buyer," adapt-
ed for the theatre by Paul Shyre
in Trueblood Aud.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4
8 p.m.-Prof. Gordon J. Bahr
will speak on "The Early Years
of the Church" as the sixth lec-
ture of the series on "The Jews
and Jesus" at the B'nai B'rith
Hillel Center.
8 p.m.-Albert J. Kelley, direc-
tor of Electronics and Control in
the Office of Advanced Research
dna Technology of the National
Science Aeronautics and Space Ad-
ministration, will speakon "Ad-
vaned Research and Technology
in Space Electronics" in Rackham
Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
will present the Tuskegee Institute
Choir in concert at Hill Aud.
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre will present "The Child
Buyer" in Trueblood Aud.'
THURSDAY, MARCH 5
4 p.m.-The International Stu-
Ident Association will hold a tea

4:10 p.m.-The Student Labora-
tory Theatre will present Act IV
of Ibsen's "Brand" and "The Last
Word" by James Broughton in the
Arena Theatre.1
8 p.m.-The International Stu-
dents Association will hold a sem-
inar with foreign student leaders
from Southeast Asia in conjunc-
tion with nine University profes-
sors as a part of International
Week.
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present "The
Child Buyer" in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The University Ba-
roque Trio will give a program of
music by Arcangelo Corelli, Gott-
-fried Stozel, Telemann, Johann
Auantz and Robert Valentine in
Rackham Aud.
FRIDAY, MARCH 6
4:15 p.m.-Dr. Samuel Messick
of the Education Testing Service
will speak on "Stylistic Measure
of Personality" in Aud. B.
8 p.m.-Prof. Gerhart Niemeyer
of the University of Notre Dame
will speak on "The Problems of
Ideology" as a part of a program
on "Contemporary Political Thouh
on' "Contempopary P o 1i t i c a 1
Thought: The Issues and Prob-
lems" seponsored by the Univer-
sity Phileutherian Society in the
Third Floor Conference Rm. of
the Union.
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present "The
Child Buyer" in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The Eastern Ortho-
dox Student Society will present
a program of Byzantine music in

Week

Hill Aud. Four choirs will be sing-
ing in four languages.'
8:30 p.m. -- The Union-League
will present Erick Hawkins and
Dance Company in "8 Clear
Places," "Early Floating," and
"Cantilever" as the opening pro-
gram of the Creative Arts Festi-
val in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
SATURDAY, MARCH 7
2:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present "The
Child Buyer" in Trueblood Aud.,
3-6 p.m.-Architecture fraterni-
ty Alpha Rho Chi will sponsor.
an are show at the fraternity, 640.
Oxford Rd.
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present "The
Child Buyer" in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m. -- The Union-League
will present Erick Hawkinds and

Dance Company in "Here and Now
with Watchers" as a part of the
Creative Arts Festival in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
9 p.m.-The International Stu-
dents Association will sponsor the
Monte Carlo Ballr in the Union
Ballroom.
SUNDAY, MARCH 8
2:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present "The
Child Buyer" in Trueblood Aud.
3 p.m.-The School of Music
will ,present a wind instrument
concert in Lane Hall Aud., per-
forming works by Mozart, Bouch-
er and Bonneau.
3-6 p.m.-Alpha Rho Chi will
sponsor an art show at the frater-
nity, 640 Oxford Rd.
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present "The
Child Buyer" in Trueblood Aud.

i

1r

:
a

STUDENTS and FACULTY
Dial 662.8871 for
Cinema Cquild
Program Information

i

.

DIAL
2-6264

.

STARTS TODAY *
Shows at 1:00-2:50
4:50-6:55 and 9:00
Feature 7 mins. later

Petition For
MUSKET
GENERAL CHAIRMAN
Feb. 28-March 8
May Pick Up Petitions at
UNION MAIN DESK Anytime

Evaluate Student Participation in SACUA

A bold, blushing, outrageously funny

'r

4

(Continued from Page 1)

CAMPUS PACS,
At Last,- Both Men's and Women's
ON SALE
MARCH 3-5, 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
Diag and Union
$2.00 plus value for 50c
Proceeds support WUS and Sphinx
(Incredible but True: giving yourself a bargain
gives eduducational, medical, food and lodg-
ing assistance to University students through-
out the world.)

Thomas Triggs, Grad, student
epresentative tothe planning sub-
committee, said he could see stu-
dent representation continuing,
but "not gaining in constructive
coexistence with faculty."
He commented that the faculty
members' reaction was "favorable,
and sympathetic to students want-
ing to contribute something."
The work of the subcommittee
"interests me very much," Triggs
said, "but there is little I can
suggest from a student viewpoint
toward its long-range planning."
Hepredicted that student par-
ticipation on subcommittees prob-
ably will continue, "especially as
the chairmen come more and more
to recognize" student involvement.
Since the SACUA bodies are
relatively small, composed of 12-13
members, more than one student
per subcommittee would tend to
inhibit their work, Triggs felt.
EPC: One's Enough
Prof. John W. Henderson of the
ophthalmology department, chair-
man of the educational policies
subcommittee also thought one
student representative "is probably
sufficient." Prof. Henderson said
the faculty is "glad to have" the
student sitting with his commit-
tee.
However, the student only at-
tended the first of the subcom-
mittee's three meetings. He re-
ceives minutes of the meetings, but
"hasn't contacted us since," Prof.
Henderson said.
Harley Bornbach, Grad, delegate
to the Henderson subcommittee,
commented that he "felt extremely
well accepted" by the faculty. "The
members seemed quite pleased to
have a student representative."
Concerning the experience, Born-
bach said, "There is no question in
my mind that I am learning some-
thing."
Instruction
The improvement of instruction
subcommittee has two students
who have met with it twice, Chair-
man Prof. John S. Diekhoff of the
education school noted.
According to Prof. Diekhoff, the
two students are "active and
imaginative"; they have taken full
part in the discussion of the
agenda.
He noted that he felt "two stu-
dents are better than one-I don't

know at what point the nupnber
would be excessive."
Daryl Bem, Grad, one of the
students meeting with the sub-
committee agreed that two were
better than one-preferably one
undergraduate and one graduate
student.
Non-Rep
Regarding the effect of student
participation on the SACUA body,
Bem noted, "I don't see how we
can relate back our experiences
to the student, body as a whole."
Prof. Gordon Brown of the
epidemiology department, com-
mented that the faculty members
were pleased with the presence of,
two student representatives to his
research policy subcommittee.
Howard Schreyer, Grad, one of
two student representatives to the
subcommittee, said he is "def-
initely benefitting from what I've
learned."

One drawback to student par-
ticipation on the committee is
that "the faculty informed us it
doesn't want information let out.
They thought it would hinder
their work if it was," he said.
"The hesitancy to let this in-
formation out is the big thing to
overcome. These problems certain-
ly didn't shock me even though I
didn't know about them before."
According to Schreyer, he and
the other student representative
"are the only ones benefitting
from our participation.I thought
the purpose of it was to inform
more students of faculty work."
Whether or not students will in
fact continue participating on the
SACUA groups will be decided by
next year's subcommittee chair-
men, SACUA Chairman William
Kerr of the nuclear engineering
department said

"My guess is that they will
allow them to continue, although I
have no way of insuring this."
He said that he would recom-
mend that students be seated
again.
Prof. Kerr pointed out that a
continuing student-faculty inter-
change can be valuable as an ef-
fort to find ways to better the
University. Prof. Kerr noted that
the seating of students on the
faculty groups was "not the cul-
mination of a student-faculty gov-
ernment plan, but a look at the
problems involved in working to-
gether."
Prof. Kerr attributed the lack
of whole-heated enthusiasm on the
part of the faculty for the idea
to begin in its first year-it may
be just that it deserves a fair
trial.

..~.AlbertoG ordi
'Toled...dr ndt toled°

mlt

4 l

K-
)

Wide Variety of Tours
planned for students only
SORBONNE STUDY TOUR
70 days, $1388
including England, Holland, Belgium,
France, Spain, Portugal
DISCOVERY ADVENTURE
TOUR OF EUROPE
76 days, $1295
Many other Student Tours featuring
Europe, Israel, Greece and USSR.
Ask-for Plans and Profitable
Organizer Arrangements
SPECIALISTS IN
STUDENT TRAV EL t'R~
SINCE 1926
for folders and details
SEE YOUR LOCAL TRAVEL AGENT
or write
UNIVERSITY TRAVEL COMPANY
Cambridge 38, Mass.

I

A

"A GEM OF A FILM"'
Bosley Crowther
N.Y. Times

DIAL 8-6416
u 1 l

U

I

QIP.) GSG
i o ~
!000 00

DIAL 5-6290
Remember-
The First Night
Feature Starts 6:45
Shows at 1:15-3:45-6:30-9:05
Feature 15 Min. Later

"The saga of 'TOM JONES'
Vibrant Comic Classic!"
-Hugh Holland
Mich. Daily
"BEST COMEDY
EVER MADE!"
-Newswe*J

I

ERICK

2ND WEEK
(Stays at Least thru Mar. 5th)
NOMINATED FOR
10

s ,
_ . . .
~^ : :.?
1 .
, - . _ '9
Z"-
, ., .
: '> "
_.. :.
,.:v: :

HAWKINS
and
DANCE COMPANY
March 6, 8:30 p.m.
"8 CLEAR PLACES"
"EARLY FLOATING"
1,r' A L r1ri C/ir,

i

I

I

ii

I

I

y : .

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan