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February 23, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-02-23

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN lRAIT.V

1AG1 TW. 21 , 1 . .a <I 1 il NCU f

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1964

E.

ARTS R& LETTERS:
Condemns Electronic Music'

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS

STIRTON'S BABY:
Industry, Education
Unite at Dearborn

7
A

By STEVEN HALLER
and JEFFREY K. CHASE
"The label 'electronic music' is
a misnomer: a composition may
be either electronic or music, but
not both," Wolfgang Sawallisch,
permanent conductor of the Vien-
na Symphony, said here recently.
He explained that an electric
sound source can be seriously con-
sidered only as a source of sound
and not as a source of music be-
cause the sound source and the
compositional procedure are two
entirely separate factors.
Many people do not think of the
twelve-tone compositions of the
"Viennese School" Arnold Schoen-
berg and his disciples Alban Berg
and Anton Webern) as music. but
rather as random sounds. Yet such
people are wrong, Sawallisch not-
ed.
Technique Plus Instruments
He explained that these works
are music for two reasons: they
employ a strict compositional tech-
nique and their sounds emanate
from musical instruments.
"We offered the Webern 'Six
Pieces for Orchestra' as a possible
selection to all cities in which we
played during our tour. Of these
cities, only Ann Arbor and Ithaca
requested the Webern work."
Since Ann Arbor and Ithaca are
both college towns, this might in-
dicate that avant-garde music is
better appreciated in such edu-
cational environments.
Not Appreciated
Sawallisch noted that the music
of Anton Bruckner is not greatly
appreciated in this country, al-;
though that composer is much re-
vered in Austria and Germany.
"There it is possible to schedule

a program consisting entirely of
one Bruckner symphony, which
may run an hour or more in
length.," he said.
He added that players and the
conductor are much closer to the
feeling of the music; for that
reason, performances of Bruckner's
works are more successful there
than in this country.

far more evident in Europe than
in this country. "In West Germany
alone there are 54 different
theaters, each of which has its own
orchestra.
"In addition, there are about 10
radio symphony orchestras whose
principal function is to provide
concerts for the listening public.
These orchestras are all full-
fledged symphony orchestras sim-
ilar to the NBC Symphony that
Arturo Toscanini once conducted.
"Each radio station also has an
orchestra to provide music for
commercials and background pur-
poses and even an additional or-
chestra to handle dance music,"
he said.
Better Chance
Under these circumstances, it is
obvious that an aspiring musician
has a far greater chance to learn
his trade and to display his tal-
ents in Europe than be would in
this country, he noted.
Many American conductors have
found it to their advantage to
start out their musical career in
Europe. Among these are Lorin
Maazel and Dean Dixon.
Sawallisch noted that Dixon's
was a special case, however. As a
Negro, Dixon is faced with special
problems in trying to pursue a
musical career in this country.
Foreign Acclaim
Mazzel has met with much ac-
claim abroad; but Sawallisch
pointed out that this conductor
was most successful when he con-
ducted works which called for a
large amount of brilliance, a char-
acteristic quality of Maazel's
style.

TODAY
2 p.m.-The Intercooperative
Council will hold an open meet-
ing for those interested in Wo-
men's Coops in the Henderson
Rm. of the Michigan League. A
tour of the coops will follow the
meeting.
7 p.m.-Prof. George E. Men-
denhall of the Near Eastern studies
department, and Rabbi Max Ka-
pustin, director of the B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation at Wayne State
University, will present the second
of two dialogues on "Jesus, The
Man and His Teachings" at Hillel.
MONDAY, FEB. 24
8 a.m.-5 p.m.-Single tickets will
go on sale for the Smothers
Brothers, who will appear Satur-
day in Hill Aud.
TUESDAY, FEB. 25
4:10 p.m--Prof. Alfred S. Ro-
mer of Harvard University will
speak onh"The Invasion of the
Land by the Vertebrates" in Rack-
ham Aud.
7:30 pm.-The Peace Corps will
hold a student meeting in the
Union Ballroom, featuring as main
speaker Richard Graham, Peace
Corps director in Tunisia.
7:30 p.m.--Yehezkel Barnea,
counsul in charge of news and in-
formation for the Israeli Consulate
in Chicago, will describe the "Po-
litical Image of Israel" in the
Multipurpose Rm. of the UGLI.
8 p.m.-James C. McDonald,
editor of the Toledo Blade, will
speak on "Public Administrators'
Relations with the Press" in Rack-
ham Assembly Hall.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
will present a "Composers Forum,"
featuring works by Knight Ver-

non, Barry Vercoe, Gregory Kos-
teck, David Andre and Daniel
Perlongo, in Aud. A.
8:30 p.m.-The Ann Arbor Dra-
matic Arts Center will present the
initial concert in the 1964 ONCE
Festival of Contemporary Music
in the VFW Ballroom.
The festival will consist of seven
concerts of contemporary music.
The first concert will feature the
ONCE Chamber Ensemble in a
program of works by Ann Arbor
composers.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 26
4:10 p.m.-Prof. Alfred S. Romer
of Harvard University will speak
on "From Organisms to Molecules:
Problems of Staffing and Curri-
cula in Biology" in Rackham Aud.
7:30 p.m.-Mrs. Larry Slobodkin
will speak on the "Cultural Image
of Israel" in the Multipurpose Rm.
of the UGLI.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present "The Firebugs," a
social satire by the Swiss play-
wright Max Frisch, in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
8 p.m.-Prof. Paul J. Alexander
of the history department will
speak on "The Trial and Death of
Jesus" at Hillel.
8:30 p.m.-The second concert
in the ONCE Festival of Contem-
porary Music will feature Robert
Ashley and Gordon Mumma in a
program of new music for pianos
in the VFW Ballroom.
8:30 p.m.-The University Musi-
cal Society will present Teresa
Berganza, coloratura, as a part
of the Choral Union series in Hill
Aud. The program will include.
works by Haydn, Handel, Rossini,
Donizetti, Toludra, Obradors and
Turina.
THURSDAY, FEB. 27
4:15 p.m.-Prof. Mark J. Dres-
den of the University of Pennsyl-
vania will speak on "Aspects of
Parsi History and Scholarship" in
Aud. C.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present Max Frisch's "The
Firebugs" in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.

8 p.m.-Roger Smith of the po-
litical science department will
speak on "Cambodia in the Con-
text of Southeast Asia" in Rack-
ham Assembly Hall.
8:30 p.m.-The third concert in
the ONCE Festival of Contem-
porary Music will feature the
Judson Dance Theatre in a pro-
gram of modern dance in the VFW
Ballroom.
FRIDAY, FEB. 28
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present Max Frisch's "The
Firebugs" in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The ONCE Festival
of Contemporary Music will fea-
ture the Brandeis University
Chamber Chorus, directed by Alvin
Lucier, in the VFW Ballroom.
8:30 p.m.-The University Con-
sort of viols will be heard in con-
cert in Rackham Aud.
SATURDAY, FEB. 29
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present Max Frisch's "The
Firebugs" in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The Smothers Broth-
ers, folk-singing duo, will appear
in Hill Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The Brandeis Univer-
sity Chamber Chorus will be fea-
tured at the ONCE Festival of
Contemporary Music in the VFW
Ballroom.
SUNDAY, MARsit of
3 p.m.-The University of Il-
linois Contemporary Chamber En-
semble, directed by Jack McKenzie,
will be featured at the ONCE Fes-
tival of Contemporary Music in
the VFW Ballroom.
5:30-8 p.m.-The International
Students Association will hold an
International Peace Meal as th(
opening feature of Internatione
Week. The meal will feature n
guest speaker from the United
States National Students Associa-
tion.
18:30 p.m.-The -Bob James
Modern Jazz Trio will perform at
the ONCE Festival of Contem-
porary Music inthe VFW Ball-
room.

(Continued from Page 1)
ing Stirton says.
To ease their employee short-
ages, the firms had come to ask
for the establishment of a joint
program whereby University stu-
dents would alternate between a
semester working on campus and
a semester working in industry.
For the firms, such an arrange-
ment would give them early-rooted
ties with potential employees and
advantages for hiring evaluations.
But the University was not im-
mediately sold on the plan, Stirton
recalls.
"Industry had come to us," Stir-
ton emphasizes. "The University
wanted to be in the driver's seat
to structure a step-by-step ad-
vancement program for our stu-
dents-studying at Dearborn and
working for industry."
Their plan, to cost induustry
some $10.5 million for buildings
and land, stressed the following
features, which the companies also
found acceptable:
1) a two-year senior college
offering limited graduate pro-

grams expanding to a capacity of
1,650 on-campus students.
Specifically, the college would
present a tri-divisional selection
of courses.
2) a comprehensive policy to
help eliminate the threefold man-
power problem. Called the "coop-
erative education plan," it offered
an internship program for all en-
gineering and business adminis-
tration students.
3) an exciting new educational
venture, the trimester system, was
officially to be instituted by 1960.
In October of 1959, the Stirton
hybrid opened on what he calls
its "insulated, yet isolated" 212-
acre campus. Located in the heart
of the southeastern industrial
complex, the four shining struc-
tures rose amidst farmland and
forest on part of the wooded estate
of Henry Ford.
Without tax funds, Stirton and
the University had set an exam-
ple for education-industry coop-
eration. He was now ready to build
a good name for the University.
(TUESDAY: Spreading the im-
age of the maize and blue).

WOLFGANG SAWALLISCH
"When one hears a truly fine
performance of Bruckner's music
in the United States, it is often
traceable to the number of Euro-
pean players in the orchestra or
to a conductor of European de-
scent," he continued.
European Interest
Sawallisch added that a strong
interest in music in general is

U

age of the maize and blue).
U

ONI

'

A FESTIVAL OF NEW MUSIC

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7

CONCERTS,

'4

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Build-
Ing before 2 p.m. of the day pre-
ceding publication, and by 2 p.m.
Friday for Saturday and Sunday.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23
Day Calendar
School of Music Recital of Trombone
Students--Lane Hali Aud., 3 p.m.
Cinema Guild - Paddy Chayevsky's
"The Goddess" with Kim Stanley, Lloyd
Bridges; plus short, "The Mechanics of
Dove": Architecture Aud., 7 p.m. and 9
p.m.
For Other University ;Events today
see the Across Campus column.
General Notices
Physical Education-Women Students:
Women students taking required physi..
cal education who were medically de-!
ferred for the first half of this semes-
ter should report to Office 15, Barbour
Listen to news, sports
and music on the
GERMAN HOUR
every Sunday from 7-8 P.M.
on
WAAM Radio
1600
DIAL 5-6290
Remember-
The First Night
Feature Starts 6:45
Shows at 1:15-3:45-6:30-9:05
Feature 15 Min. Later
"TOM JONES is
among the finest screen
achievements of all time"
-Hugh Holland
Mich. Daily
"BEST COMEDY
EVER MADE!"
--Newswe47

Gym to sign up for their spring ac-
tivity. Registration will be held from
8 a.m. to noon and 1-5 p.m., Feb. 20-
27. Upperclass students who wish to
elect physical 'ed, classes may do so on
Wed., March 25, Main Floor, Barbour
Gym.
This Week: Univ. Players (Dept. of
Speech). Max Frisch's satire, "The Fire-
bugs." Wed, through Sat., 8 p.m., Lydia
IMendelssohn Theatre. Box office opens
Mon. Tickets also available for Playbill
opera, Tchaikovsky's The Queen of
Spades," May 5-9.
Events Monday
Doctoral Examination for John Ed-
ward Brokloff, Metallurgical Engrg.;
thisis: t The Effect of Temperature
and Oxidation on the Reactions be-
tween Iron and Alumni-Silica Refractor-
Les," Mon., Feb. 24, 3201 E. Engrg. Bldg.,
at 2 p.m. Chairman, L. H. Van Vlack. {
Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS, Bureau of
Appointments-Seniors & grad students,
please, call Ext. 3544 for appointments
with the following:
MON., FEB. 24-
John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance
Co., Detroit, Mich. - Men & Women
(women must be 25 yr. or more) (p.m.
only). Seeking May & Aug. grads with
majors in Engl., Soc.,' Psych., & Gen.
Liberal Arts. Positions: Insurance Sales.
U.S. citizenship.
TUES., FEB. 25-
International Business Machines,
Dearborn, Mich. & Wash., D.C.-Men &
women. Seeking Dec., May & Aug. grads
with majors in Econ., Astro., Gen. Lib-
eral Arts, Math, Physics, & Chem. Po-
sitions: IBM does not have mgmt. trng.
prog. All trainees go in through one
of the following: Elec. computing, Prod.,
Sales (territorial), Sys. Engineers, Com-

puter Programmer, Desigfn, Res. & Dev.
IBM has summer positions avail, for
Jrs. & Srs. who wlil be available for
permament employment 1 yr. later with
the Federal Systems in Bethesda, Md.
U.S. Civil Service Commission, Chi-
cago, Ill.-Men & women. Seeking Dec.,
May & Aug. grads-Liberal Arts for all
kinds of positions with the Fed Govt.,
avail. through FSEE.
Social Security Admin., Chicago, IlI.-
Men & women. Dec., May & Aug. grads.
1) Claims Examiner Trainee GS-5-Re-
sponsible for correct appli. of tech.
knowledge of pertinent laws, regula-
tions, & policies necessary for making
required adjustments in the accounts of
beneficiaries. , 2) Claims Authorizer
Trainee GS-7-Makes findings of fact
& law & determinations as to entitle-
ment.
Social Security Admin.-Men & wom-
en. Dec., May & Aug. grads. Seeking
any major field of study for claims
Reps. About 600 field offices throughout
U.S.
Brunswick Corp.. Chicago, ill. - Men,
May & Aug. grads. Seeking General
Liberal Arts for positions in Produc-
tion & Sales (for Health & Sic. Div.
only). Location: Prod. in Midwest; Sales
-Nationally.
WED., FEB. 26-
IBM-(See Tuesday).
U. of M., Ann Arbor, Personnel Of-
fice-Men & women. Dec., May & Aug.
grads. Seeking Chem. (general, analyt.,
inorg., org., phys.); Biochem. & Bacti.
Positions: R & D.
Leo Burnett Co., Inc., Chicago, Ill.-
Men & women. May & Aug. grads. Seek-
ing: Econ., Poll. Scl., Engl., Journ., For.
Lang., Geog., Soc., Psych., Anthro., Hist.,
Law, Fine Arts (design), Lib. Sdi., Mu-
sic, Philo., Astro., Speech, Educ. & Gen-
eral Liberal Arts. Advertising positions
with home office.
Corning Glass Works, Corning, N.Y.-i
Men & women, Dec., May & Aug. grads.
Seeking: Majors in Econ., Poli. Sel.,
Engl,, For. Lang., Psych., Fine Arts (de-I

sign), Educ., Journ., Gen. Liberal Arts,
& Arch. Positions: Adv., Design, Eocn.,
Elec. Computing, Mkt. Res., Personnel,
Prod., Purchasing, Sales (inside & ter-
ritorial), Sales promotion, Stat. & Traf-
fic.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign interview schedule at 128-H W.
Engrg. for appointments with the fol-
FEB. 26-27-
Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co., Various lo-
cations: BS, MS, Prof.: EE, IE, ME,sMet.
BS-MS: EM & Mat'ls. BS: E Math, E
Physics & Sci. Engrg. MS-Prof.: Nu-
clear. May & Aug. grads. R. & D., Des.,
Prod. & Sales.
The Bendix Corp., All corp. divs. &
locations not scheduled to be on Cam-
pus also students uncertain of Div. of
greatest interest-All Degrees: AE & As-
tro., EE & ME. MS-PhD: Commun. St.
& Instru. BS: E Math, EM, E Physics &
Sd. E. May & Aug. grads. R. & D., Des.,
Prod. & Sales.
FEB. 26-
Bendix Corp., Lakeshore Div., St. Jo-
seph, Mich.-BS-MS: ME. Dev., Des.
FEB. 26-27-
Bendix Corp., Products Aerospace Div.,
South Bend. Ind.-All Degrees: AE &
Astro. & ME. BS-MS: EM. MS: Nu-
clear. R. & D., Des., Prod.
Bendix Corp., Products Automotive
Div., South Bend, Ind.-BS: ME. May
& Aug. grads. Des., Test & Dev.
Bendix Corp., BendixMissiles-Mish-
awaka, Mishawaka, Ind.-AiI Degrees:
EE, EM, ME. MS-PhD: AE & Astro.
R. & D., Oes., or Engrg. Trng. Prog.
FEB. 26-
Bendix Corp., Research Labs., South-
fid, Mch.-MS-PhD: EE & Physics.
Dec. & May grads. R. & D.
International Harvester Co., All corp.
operations-BS-MS: CE, EE, IE, ME,
Met. BS: Sci. Engrg. Dec., May & Aug.
grads. R. & D., Des., Prod. & Sales.
(Continued on Page 3)

r

I

STUDENTS and FACULTY
Dial 662.8871 for
C hi ema a qJuilci
Program Information

VFW BALLROOM, 314 E. Liberty
Series 7.50; Single 2.25, on sale now:
Marshall's Bookshop-Record Center-Disc Shop
and from Dramatic Arts Center, P.O. Box 179
Tues., Feb. 25 8:30 ONCE Festival Orchestra
Wed., Feb. 26 8:30 Robert Ashley & Gordon Mumma
Thur., Feb. 27 7:00 & 10:00 Judson Dance Theatre
Fri., Feb. 28 8:30 Brandeis Chorus/electronic music
Sat., Feb. 29 8:30 Chorus/ensemble/opera
Sun., Mar. 1 3:00 Illinois Percussion Ensemble
Sun., Mar. 1 8:30 Bob James Trio & Eric Dolphy
--presented by The Dramatic Arts Center-

4

9

I

DIAL
8-64 16

4-1

Continuous Shows
Today from 1 P.M.

I -----------

.

.00-

DIAL STARTING TODAY
Shows at 1:05-3:00
2-6264 5:00-7:00 and 9:05
Feature 1 0 Mins. Later
STARTING SUNDAY *
DEAN MARTIN
ASKS THE HOTTEST QUESTION OF THE DAY:
"Who n Been
Sleeping InM BRed
:. A JACK ROSE Pradutti.n

't

"BIZARRE AND BARBARIC;...MACABRE AND GRUESOME...
IRONIC, BLOOD-STAINED AND SADISTIC... UNCONVENTION-
AL...PROVOCATIVE... CONTROVERSIAL ...FILMED TO PRO-
DUCE MAXIMUM SHOCK!"-Frank Quinn, Daily Mirror

mm

I

am'"

"SIGHTS
NEVER
BEFORE
PHOTOGRAPHED
... SEE IT FOR
YOURSELF!
LIVE AND
LEARN!
Fascinating
... .Shocking!"

"HORRIFYING,
x WEIR D,
HIDEOUS,
BIZARRE,
VORACIOUS
,A N D
FRANK!"
.--Bosley Crowther,.
N~ew York Times

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS (Dept. of Speech) present
THE FIREBUGS
MAX FRISCH's "Smoldering Satire"
Wednesday-Saturday
8 P.M.-LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Box Office Opens ToMorrow
12:30-5
(until 8 p.m. on performance nights)

I

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Produced by GUALTIERO JACOPETTI
TECHNICOLOR * A Times Film Release
____Also-_ so

"WOMEN OF
THE WORLD"

c-m ELIZABETH i MARTIN JILL
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CONTE-NYE-SOOMERIL-TANI-FOSTER-REID-BURNETT
Na~a Av ANEI ANN "wanen EJACK ROSE * A PARAMOUNT RELEASE

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of

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"If You Bounce for THE BE A T LES
You'll Flip for THE FIREBUGS"
(featuring the Fireman Chorus)

SMOTHERS

BROT H ERS

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POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Leadership and Experience
SIGN UP NOW

SATURDAY, FEB. 29, 8:30 P.M.

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