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February 21, 1964 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-02-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE '

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

THE EXTRA POINT
by JIM BERGER

aU
Bad Belters No More
Hockey is a game of finesse, quick reflexes, superlative skating"
and teamwork. It is also one of the roughest games imaginable, and
if you don't believe it, go down to the Michigan Coliseum tonight or
tomorrow night and watch the war 'on ice between Michigan and
Minnesota.
The Wolverines and Gophers have a tradition for rough and
tumble hockey. Michigan Coach. Al Renfrew, who has been associated
with Michigan hockey for over 20 years as a player and coach, testi-
fies that as long as he remembers this has been one of the toughest
series.
Three years ago, during the '60-'61 season things got so bad
that both teams agreed to a one year cooling-off period where
neither scheduled each other.
Last year the series resumed, and the two teams belted their way
through four games. The Gophers, who finished fourth in the WCHA
las season won two games. The other two games ended in ties.
This year, Michigan has been the surprise of the Western
Collegiate, Hockey Association. The Wolverines have plowed
through Michigan Tech, Michigan State, and Colorado College.
Their one loss has been to those Gophers at Minnesota where
the two teams split earlier this season.

y

'cer
By DICK REYNOLDS
Michigan hockey fans are in for
a real treat this weekend when the
Wolverine icemen take on Minne-
sota in a two-game series at the
Coliseum.
Flying high on the crest of a
ten-game winning streak, the
Maize and Blue squad of Coach
Al Renfrew will be out to strength-!
en its hold on first place in the
Western Collegiate Hockey Asso-
ciation, and in doing so will trv,
to settle some old scores with the
Gophers.
The Michigan-Minnesota series1
has long been known as one of the
bitterest in collegiate hockey
circles.
No Secret
It's no secret that whenever
these two teams get together on
the ice the spectators are in for
some close bard-checking hockey
to say the least. In the 151 meet-
ings between the two schools,
Michigan has won 66 and lost 74,
11 games have ended in a t2.
The Minnesota sextet is likely
to be in a mean mood followin~g
a pair of defeats at the hand. of
lowly Colorado College last week-
end, 8-4 and 7-6. The double loss
to CC dropped the Gophers from
first place to third in the WCHA
standings with a 7-3 records.
In th. first meeting this seasoni,

To Risk

Win Streak

CHRIST'S RETURN
past, future or-?
Discussion-Refreshments

the two teams split at Mioneapo-
lis with Michigan winning the
opener, 5-1. and losing the second
game, 6.5. Since that time the
Wolvorines have skated past ten
straight oppornents while runnitg
its season's mark to 16-2.
Pa-t of Success,
Part of the Gophers' earl:;r suc-
cess against the Wolverines result-

High Scorers .

G A
Gordie Wilke, c 13 36
Gary Butler, w 27 22
Wilf Martin, c 27 19
Jack Cole, w 17 17
Tom Polonic, d 6 24
R. Coristine, w 10 15;
Mel Wakabayashi, c....
13 11
Alex Hood, w 8 13
Bob Ferguson, w 7 13
B. MacDonald, d 9 11
Marty Read, w 6 10
P. Dechaine, w 3 12
G. Forrest, w 4 7
T. Henderson, d 1 8
R. Galipean, d 2 6
Rick Day, d 0 6
Dave Newton, d 1 4
Bob Gray, g 2 0
Bill Bieber, g 0 0

;;

TP
49
49
46
34
30
25

. .
P PIM
4 8
7 14
48
12 24
22 58
4 16

24 1
21 9
20 11
20 20
16 8
15 2
11 3
9 '7
8 12
6 2
5 4
2 3
0 0
391 135
97 83

2
18
30
40
16
4
6
14
24
4
8
6
0
300
191

ed from theil effective defense
agains, Michigan's high-scoring
forward Gaiy Butler, who was
held to a psir of assists in the
series.
Since that time however the
Michigan team has shown great
scoring balance with six players
registering 10 goals or more )n
the season statistics. Butlec nd
Captain (ordie Wilke lead the
Maize and Blue scoring parade
with 49 pohta apiece.
Close on the tail of the Butler-
Wilke duo is sophomore Wilf Mar-
tin, who has recorded 27 goals and
19 assists. The Mallaig, Alberta
ceinter also leads the WCHA scor-
ing race with nine goals and eight
assists for 17 points.
Another Addition
Another important addition to
the Michigan offense since the
first meeting with the Gophers is
Mel Wakabayashi, a pint-sized
forward who has notched 13 goals
and 11 assists since joining the
squad at the beginning of the sec-
ond semester.
While Michigan's offense has
received a great deal of publicity,
mention must be made of the
Blue's ~defensive corps of Tom
Polonic, Ted Henderson, Barry
MacDonald and Roger Galipeau.
A questionable spot at the be-
ginning of the season, the rapid
improvement of the backliners
coupled with the sparkling play
of Bob Gray in the nets has been
instrumental in Michigan's drive
for WCHA and NCAA honors.
Shows Value
Gray showed his value in the
Michigan State series last weekend
when he ,performed almost flaw-
lessly in goal. At East Lansing
Friday night, the senior goal tend-
er picked up his fourth shutout of
the season, blanking the Spartans,
2-0. The following night he had
his string of 156 minutes of shut-
out hockey broken when MSU's

Doug Roberts scored with two
Michigan men in the penalty box.
Wingman Roy Nystrom leads
the Gopher attack with 12 goals
and 15 assists in 20 games. Fol-
lowing Nystrom is junior wing-
man Craig Falkman with 23 points
on 12 goals and 11 assists.
Falkman ranks fifth in WCHA
scoring with 13 points, while Ny-
strom is ninth with 12 markers.
Game time for both games is
8 p.m.
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On hand for the Michigan-Minnesota series
born, sports editor of the Minnesota Daily, who
to those "rough and dirty" Wolverines.

was one Clint San-
devoted his column

Team Totals
Opp. Totals

156 235
42 55

MUTLI-PURPOSE ROOM

UGLI

Entitling his column "Bad Belters Still," Sanborn maintains that
although Wayne Kartusch and Ross Morrison, two of Michigan's all
time sin bin dwellers, have left, the team remains a bunch of vicious
rascals.
Roll Call of Rogues..
Sanborn listed a roll call of rogues which goes as follows:
"Black Jack Cole, a crooked nosed introvert who cherishes the
solitude of the sin box.
"Bob Gray, a part-time pugilist from Owen Sound, Ont.
"Tom Polonic, a silent smirking blackguard from Toronto.
"Gary Butler, a swift and gifted artisan from Regina, Sask.
Although, there's no doubt that the series at Minneapolis was
the typical rough and tough Michigan-Minnesota clash, it's not
hard to smell the sour grapes.
Minnesota and its coach, the redoubtable John Mariucci have
always cried that his poor Americans were whipped and bullied by
those big, mean Canadians. It's a beautiful excuse for losing.
To any Michigan hockey fan who has seen the Wolverines this
year, the truth is obvious. Unlike former teams, Michigan plays good,
fundamental hockey. This year's team has no superstars but a bal-"
anced squad.
Coach Renfrew strongly discourages any "dirty" tactics, and en-
courages good, clean hockey.
Michigan is a better hockey team than Minnesota, not a dirtier
team, and if you don't believe it, go to the Coliseum this weekend.

Goalie Records:
Bob Gray
Bill Beber
Opponents

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3 38 7 2.3
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(Continued from Page 1)

raise an estimated $3 million.
additional $5 million might be
aside for men's and women's
tramural facilities.
Either the Regents or

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Board in Control of Intercollegiate
Athletics could float the bond
issue, but the athletic department
has always prided itself on main-r
taining its self-sufficiency.c
The arena, of course, would re-t
place ancient Yost Field House as
M i c h i g a n ' s basketball facility.
Built in 1922-23, the Field House,
has been given nicknames like
"Morton Stadium" (when it rains,
it pours) and "The Barn."1
Crisler, the guiding force in
Michigan athletics for more than
a quarter-century, explained, "At
every Board meeting for the last
18 months. we've been hearing
progress reports by the Subcom-
mittee on Plant Expansion.
"All I can say is, we're begin-
ning to jell now. If we get the
financing and approval taken care
of, we're in a position to move
pretty fast."
Crisler said that he and other
members of the athletic depart-
ment have been touring the coun-
try to look at other basketball
arenas and will be making an-
other trip next week.
"The approach we've taken has
been not to try to copy these other
buildings, but to find out what
the school would change if they
had it to do over again," Crisler
said. "We've collected quite a file
of material."
Agitation for a new arena dates
back to the 1940's, when Yost was
widely acclaimed as one of the
worst facilities in the conference.
Last year, when Illinois opened its
awesome new Assembly Hall, Yost
was left alone at the bottom of
the Big Ten.
The Athletic Department's cur-
rent program of plant /expansion
began with a preliminary report
last May. The report said that a
tentative arena "would be located
north of Stadium Blvd. east of the
Football Stadium so that asso-
ciated parking lots, locker rooms,

and public sanitary facilities could
be used for football as well as
basketball and other facilities. The
new arena would be primarily a
basketball facility although it
would undoubtedly find bonus
uses for popular entertainment,
dances and commencement."
The report estimated that "ar
arena seating upward of 12,00(
around a basketball floor could be
constructed for approximately $S
million."
Crisler has indicated since ther
that he would prefer an arena
with 15,000 to 16,000 seats. Thi.
is twice as many as Yost can seat,
and four times as many, accord-
ing to a national sports maga-
zine, as Yost can seat with a viewo
to the court.

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