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February 21, 1964 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-02-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1PUTT A"ST 17'L'IMlMTTA11P'%r Al InAPAP

________________________________________________ ,rnui

rflYn FERUR 21rnr =n s, 1564

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DINING EXCELLENCE AT

DESPITE CONFERENCE DEADLOCK
cWe'll Be All Right

Golden Tree Room

Town and Country Room

Main Dining Room
Featuring
MAINE LIVE LOBSTERS
and

By GARY WINER
"We'll be all right," Coach Dave
Strack said yesterday in reference
to the tie in the conference be-
tween the Wolverines and Ohio
State.
"I know we'll take the rest of
them. We're going to have to take
them because I can't count on
Ohio State losing any. This is all
going to have to come from us."
Michigan and Ohio State, each
8-2, have four remaining games
in the Big Ten. The Wolverines
have only dropped three of their
20 games this year, but all of them
DOUBLES LEAGUEI

CHAMPAGNE COCKTAILS
Mon. thru Thurs. Fri. and Sat. Sunday
11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. 11:30 a.m.-1 a.m. Noon - 8:30 p.m.
JACKSON ROAD AT THE 1-94 AND M-14 EXIT

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have come on the road, and the
Wolverines still have to face Wis-
consin (Feb. 22) and Iowa (March
7) on their opponents' court.
No Excuses
Strack made no attempt to offer
any excuses for the 89-75 blitzing
Minnesota gave his team Tuesday
evening at Minneapolis. "Minne-
sota is a very good squad," Strack
commented. "They're fast and
strong and I'd say they're about
the best team we've faced in the
conference this year."
Michigan gained an 11-8 lead
in the first half, but from that
point on, the Gophers proceeded
to outscore the' nation's second-
ranked team, 14-1. Strack felt that
that was probably the turning
point in the game. "We started
getting cold about then," he re-
lated. "We missed a few shots and
gave a few passes away sowe be-
gan forcing everything and you
just can't do that.
"Minnesota started to flounder
a little too, but then they began
putting in everything and before
we knew it we were down quite
a bit," he continued.
Closing the score to 23-17, Mich-
igan got cold again and allowed
Minnesota to pull ahead 33-17 and
put the game out of sight.
Statistics told the story, though,
as Minnesota hit a phenomenal 57
per cent of its shots in the first
period and calmed down slightly
to a 46 per cent clip in the sec-
ond stanza. The Wolverines, who
have been pumping the ball
through the hoop close tp 50 per
cent of the time this year, could
barely scrape together a 27 per
cent field goal average in the first
period
Each team pulled in 43 re-
bounds. For Minnesota this was

:"
'-S track
an unexpected feat against the
Wolverine board-hogs.
Trailing by 18 points, 43-25, at
intermission, Michigan came out
strong to hit on eight of its first
nine shots and eventually cut the
Gopher lead to 65-56 and 67-58.
Comeback Thwarted
According to Michigan's assist-
ant coach Jim Skala, "I thought
we did a real nice job of coming
back, but when we started to
gamble, to try to come back, Min-
nesota was a good enough team
to take advantage of our weak-
nesses."
Terry Kunze, Minnesota's guard,
pumped in eight points in a row
after intermission to keep his team
well ahead. Strack commented,
"That Kunze hurt us. He put in
a couple of thirty-foot Jumpers
that I'm willing to give any team
any day,"
Michigan hit 58 per cent, of its
field goal attempts in the second
stanza, but the well-balanced Go-
phers failed to give much ground.
"They're a very well-balanced
team," Strack stated. "After all,
they had six players in double fig-
ures and that's better than we've
ever been able to do, even though
we're capable of it."
Strack concluded by saying that,
"Minnesota is a team much like
us with a couple of good sopho-
mores. They collapsed a few times
earlier in the year and threw away
some ball games. That's been
about the only difference between
them and us."

By CHUCK VETZNER
Two injury-riddled gymnastics
teams will meet tomorrow when
Michigan State comes to Ann Ar-
bor for Michigan's last duel meet
of the season.
The meet will begin at 2 p.m.
in the Sports Building.
The Spartans will be without
Bill Curzi, a very fine all-around
performer. Dick Giliberto, a free
exercise and tumbling specialist,
will perform although handi-
capped by various injuries this
season.
Wolverine Fred Sanders will join
Rich Blanton on the sidelines.
Blanton is out for the season and
Sanders, the Big Ten trampoline
champion, is the latest cripple
with two pulled tendons in his leg.
Captain Arno Lascari will be
competing for the first time in

several weeks. He was hurt before
the season began and has been
recovering slowly. Coach Newt Lo-
ken explained Lascari's appear-
ance by saying, "Arno is trying to
get in some kind of shape for the
Big Ten meet."
The return of Lascari is not the
only sign of the approaching con-
ference meet which will be held
March 6 and 7 at Wisconsin. The
routines of the Michigan gymnasts
are geared for the Big Ten meet.
This year's new scoring system
has each judge grading a differ-
ent aspect of the routine, putting
added emphasis on the difficulty.
For this reason the gymnasts will
be altering their usual routines in
order to add more difficult moves.
But the Wolverines will not be
merely experimenting because

.

I y

I

Disabled Gymnasts Meet

I-

I

Michigan Union
Bowling Lanes

.-

11

This Weekend in Sports
TODAY
HOCKEY-Minnesota at Coliseum, 8 p.m.
SWIMMING-Michigan at Cincinnati
TOMORROW
BASKETBAL-Michigan at Wisconsin, 4:30 p.m.
GYMNASTICS-Michigan State, at Sports Bldg., 2 p.m.
HOCKEY-Minnesota, at Coliseum, 8 p.m.
SWIMMING--Michigan at Ohio State-
TRACK-Five-way Meet vs. Ohio U., Taylor U., Loyola
(Chi.) Track Club, and Ann Arbor Track Club, Yost
Field House, 2:30 p.m.
WRESTLING-Michigan at Michigan State

NEED IDEAS
for
BIRTHDAY GIFTS?
Can't think of anything to please
Mom or Dad? Need something
for the "man who has everything?"
Give a MICHIGAN DAILY
Subscription-if you care enough
to send the Very Best.
Just
Just $4.50
Call 2-3241
Circulation Dept.

94* q~

AS TANKERS INVADE OHIO:
Stager Wants More Cold weather
To Keep Swimmers in Top Health

By MIKE MEYERS
Compared to the sub-zero tem-
peratures recorded in Ann Arbor
this time last year, few people
can complain about the "warm"
readings in the upper 30's over the
past week.
One grumbler, however, is Gus
S t a g e r, Michigan's swimming
coach.,
Stager's protest is not, as one
might suspect, that he would like
it even warmer, but he wants to
go back to the good old days of
ice and wind.
"When it's really cold," Stager
explained, "the swimmers take careI
of themselves. But in this mild

weather which we're having now,
there is the temptation to go out
in shirt sleeves or light jackets.
The result-a common cold.
"This is the first time since I
started coaching here that sickness
has really hurt us," he remarked.
The hurt was deeply felt last
Friday at Minnesota, when Wol-'
verine freestyler Bill Farley only
tied for first in the 200-yard event
with a time of 1:49.1. Just one
week before against Michigan
State he set a new varsity record,
1,46.49.,
Farley did not even compete in
his other forte, the 500-yard free.,
style, because of his cold.

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SALUTE:* JIM HEYER

When he joined the Wisconsin Telephone Company in
August of 1962, Jim Heyer (B.S.E.E., 1960) immediately
learned to design television transmission circuits.
No "make-work" assignment, Jim's job calls for him to
develop circuits for use throughout Wisconsin. He also
goes into the field to check the effectiveness of his designs
once they're in operation.

There are many decisions to make, and many to defend.
But Jim enjoys the challenge and has the ability to meet it.
No wonder raises come much sooner than eKpected.
Jim Heyer, like many young engineers, is impatient to
make things happen for his company and himself. There
are few places where such restlessness is more welcomed
or rewarded than in the fast-growing telephone business.

STEAK AND SHAKE
Charbroiled Hamburger Steak
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The Wolverines should neverthe-
less be at top strength when they
invade Ohio for two dual meets
this weekend.
Take on Bearcats
Tonight, the tankers are in Cin-
cinnati where they challenge the
Bearcats of the University of Cin-
cinnati. The Cincinnatators don't
have any spectacularly good swim-
mers, and Michigan could even
sweep first in every event.
There should, however, be some
very close races for second and
third spots in some events.
The Cincy meet is a mere tune-
up for the main event tomorrow
afternoon.
After making the quick hop from
Cincinnati to Columbus, the Wol-
verines jump in head first against
ever-tough Ohio State.
The Buckeyes are not without
their share of superstars. Fore-
most on the list is Marty Mull.
The Canton, Ohio, senior is de-
scribed as the greatest all-around
swimmer in Ohio State history
from an Ohio high school.
A four-time high school All-
America, Mull set an NCAA record
in the 200-yard individual medley
as a sophomore. His time then was
2:03.4, and he has been brutally
chopping away at that mark ever
since. Last week in a dual -meet
with MSU, he touched out with, a
fantastic time of 2:00.4.
In the backstroke, Dick Mich-
aels of Plymouth, Mich., has out-
swum all expectations. Sought by
Coach Stager for Michigan, he
decided to go to OSU. Stager said
that he was "pleasantly surpris-
ed" by Michael's improvement. The
sophomore could conceivably give
Michigan's N C A A backstroke
champ, Ed Bartsch, a close con-
test.
Best at Distance
Perhaps the best distance free-
styler in Buckeye history is Lee
Danielson. The California sopho-
more might prove a serious chal-
lenge, even to a healthy Farley.
Other strong Buckeye standouts
are Nate Clark in the butterfly,
Ben Donaldson, much improved
in the 200-yard freestyle, and div-
ers Bill Glueck and Randy Lar-
son.
In their last outing, Ohio State
was put down heavily by Michigan
State, 64-44.
The Wolverine tankers return
home to face Big Ten champion
Indiana, next Thursday.

MSU is no pushover. Despite the
injuries both teams will feature
many talented, healthy perform-
ers. Spartan high bar man, Ted
Wison, has been scoring in the
90's as have been State's two top
trampoline artists, Dick Strobel
and Jim Nobel. The loss of Sand-
ers will put even more pressure on
the Wolverines' remaining tramp-
olinists, Gary Erwin and John
Hamilton.
Tod Gates, Spartan P-bar man,
has been scoring a consistent 93
and should give Alex Frecska a
battle in this event. Tom Hurt is
a fine all-around performer who
can pick up some needed points
for the underdog Spartans. In the
side horse, Michigan's Paul Levy
should have his own way.
Michigan's performance in this
meet should give a good indica-
tion of their chances for defend-
ing its Big Ten championship.
Thus far, the defending Wol-
verine NCAA champions have been
able to record only a 3-2 dual
meet record. At this time last year
they were undefeated, on the tail
end of a 22-meet winning streak
broken several weeks ago by Iowa.
No matter how small, Michigan
still has a chance to retain its
national crown this year in Los
Angeles. But that will depend en-
tirely on the conditions of its
erstwhile injured. Without depth
the Wolverines will have a rough
trail against the likes of talent-
laden Southern Illinois and Iowa.
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BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES

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INTERNATONAL WEEK

MARCH 1-7

sponsored by all campus organizations

* International Dinner

* Address by G. Mennen Williams

U -." _ _ 1 -r _I

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