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February 13, 1964 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-02-13

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1964 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PA(~U~ TTiR1~

A raual i ABEL' i{.

v

Home Notifies Johnson Britain
L To Continue Trading with Cuba

0AU Asks A frican Action
To Quell Army Mutinies
DAR ES SALAAM, Tanganyika (P)-Delegates to the Organization
of African Unity conference agreed in principle last night to form an
African force to replace British troops called into Tanganyika to put
down an army mutiny.
The delegates said a 12-nation committee had been formed to
consider how the force is to be set up. The committee included
TLnna ,ilk K nvnrAnd TYandn .

STUDENT TRAINEES:
Budget Cuts To Limit Jobs

WASHINGTON () - President'
Lyndon B. Johnson and British
Prime Minister Sir Alec Douglas-
Home opened a two-day explora-
tion of world issues yesterday and
quickly ended up in opposing
camps on curtailing trade with
Cuba.
Diplomatic informants s a i d
Mackie Sets
House Race
By The Associated Press
LANSING - Highway Commis-
sioner John C. Mackie yesterday
announced that he will be a can-
didate for the Democratic congres-
sional nomination in the new sev-
enth district, and in other action
Rep. Robert Griffin (R-Mich) in-
dicated he would seek re-election.
There had been speculation Grif-
fin might run for the seat now
held by Sen. Philip Hart (D-
Mich).
As a result of Griffin's an-
nouncement, the possibility in-
creased that State Sen. William
Milliken (R-Traverse City) will
seek the Republican nomination
for lieutenant governor this year.
Milliken indicated earlier he
would run for Griffin's seat in
Congress if Griffin decided to chal-
lenge for the United States Sen-
ate.
In Lansing today, however, Mil-
liken said he still hasn't made up
his mind whether to run for lieu-
tenant governor or not.
At the same time he announced
his congressional candidacy, Mack-
ie said he will endorse Rep. Neil
Staebler (D-Mich), the only an-
nounced Democrat, for governor.
Lt. Gov. T. John Lesinski said
yesterday the Democratic race for
governor this year "may wind up
in - a head-to-head primary be-
tween Neil Staebler and myself."
"I regret this very much," Le-
sinski said, but added that he was
"very much encouraged to run for
governor" since a trip to the
Muskegon area Tuesday.
He. said Highway Commissioner
John Mackie's announcement that
he would seek a congressional seat
instead of the governor's chair
"means nothing as far as my
decision goes."
Lesinski had given strong indi-
cation earlier he would not seek
the governor's chair unless Mack-
ie, or at least one other candi-
date, also did.

Douglas-Home made it clear Brit-
ain has no intention of joining the
United States in holding down
commerce in non-strategic goods
with Cuba.
Johnson, informants said, force-
fully restated the United States
position that the Western allies
must find a formula harmonizing
their attitudes toward the Com-
munist world.
Afterwards the two chiefs quick-
ly agreed on the need to speed
up efforts at reaching agreement
with the Soviet Union on the cen-
tral issues of Germany and Berlin.
Reportedly a new Western ap-
proach will be sought.
Johnson and Douglas-Home al-
so dug into the problems of Cy-
prus, Southeast Asia, Cuba and
East-West relations.
Johnson recalled the trodition
of meetings between American
presidents and British prime min-
isters that began with Sir Win-
ston Churchill.
"During these years we have had
our differences," Johnson said,
"but these have passed away . .
much as two brothers . . . whose
ties are too strong ever to break."
Johnson and Douglas-Home
talked alone about 45 minutes in
the President's office. The advis-
ers continued the talks another
45 minutes. American diplomats

xa ganyma,x senya a gl a,
each of which called for British
help to quell a mutiny last month.
Tanganyika's President Julius
Nyerere had called on the year-old
organization to form an African
force to prevent a recurrence of
the mutinies. He told the 33-na-
tion conference meeting here that
urgent action was needed to end
"the national humilitation" exper-
ienced when British troops had to
be called in.
Delegates reported the commit-
tee would seek first a solution to
the Tanganyika situation and then
draw on that experience to find
solutions for Kenya and Uganda.
An informed source said So-
malia's proposal to put its border
disputes with Kenya and Ethiopia
on the conference agenda was dis-
cussed without final decision.
Nyerere said his people sup-
ported the call for British help
but "the presence of troops from
a country deeply involved in the
world's cold war conflicts has
serious implications in the con-
text of African nationalism andI
our common (African) policies of
nonalignment."

ALEC DOUGLAS-HOME

present included: Secretary of
State Dean Rusk, Asst. Secretary
William Tyler and David Bruce,
ambassador to the United King-
dom. British advisers were For-
eign Secretary R. A. Butler, Sir
Harold Caccia, permanent under-
secretary of the Foreign Office;
Ambassador to the United States
David Ormsby Gore and British
Cabinet Secretary Burke Trend.

YD's Oppose
Radical View
Collegiate Press Service
LAS VEGAS-Democratic Party
"regulars" carried the day in the
recent convention of the Young
Democratic Clubs of America (YD-
CA) here, overcoming a deter-
mined drive led by westerners to
cast the YD's in a more liberal
image.
The convention backed the Lyn-
don B. Johnson administration to
the hilt, beating off moves to
strengthen the civil rights resolu-
tion and to expressly condemn ex-
treme right-wing elements.
A threatened all-out civil rights
battle between the liberal west-
erners, led by the California and
Arizona delegations, and the
Southern Democrats was averted
by an unprecedented, sudden, and
successful move to close debate
on the report of the resolutnons
committee before the expected
strong debate could take place.
The Southern delegations, led
by South Carolina, Alabam and
Georgia, managed to register op-
position "in part" to the civil
rights stands, which backed the
administration civil rights bill. The
liberals, however, expressed dissat-
isfaction that no stronger stand
could be obtained from the con-
vention.
The final vote showed the Young
Democrats on record as condemn-
ing those who delay passage of
the civil rights -bill and calling
for the use of federal registrars

Collegiate Press Service
WASHINGTON-President Lyn-
don B. Johnson's oath to fiscal
frugality is wounding one of the
late President John F. Kenne'dy's
favorite plans to woo top college
students into federal government
careers.
The Civil Service Commission
(CSC) last week reported that it
will be tougher for United States
college students to find summer
employment, in the federal gov-
ernment this year because of the
administration's pinch on pennies.
CSC Chairman John Macy, Jr.
urged all federal agencies to lim-
it their use of summer help "in
the interest of economy."
Competition Mounts
In another statement, the CSC
said:
"Student interest in summer em-
ployment has been mounting in
recent years, so competition for
the limited number of jobs will be
keen."
With a big helping hand from
the late President, top college stu-
dents from all over the nation were
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featuring Frank Kuntz
Tues., Thurs. & Sat.
Del RioBar
122 W. Washington

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urged to seek federal employment
during the past two summers.
Kennedy hoped to induce scholars
into careers in public service after
tasting the opportunities available
in the federal service.
Help Place Students
To spur the program, a special
White House aide last year was
assigned the job of helping to place
some students in summer jobs and
"make sure the good ones don't
lose out."
The White House drew charges

of political payrolling from the
CSC after it wasreported that
campus Democratic Party Clubs
had a hand in securing summer
federal jobs for their membership.
Despite the outcry, Kennedy
continued his interest in attract-
ing college students to federal
work. In addition to meeting per-
sonally with various groups of
students, his brother, Attorney
General Robert F. Kennedy, held
frequent sessions with the stu-
dents during their summer stay.

WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP:
Cypriot Rejects Peace Plan

With a Michigan
Sleeping-Team

By The Associated Press
NICOSIA, Cyprus - President
Makarios of Cyprus has turned
down a new British-American plan
for stationing an international
peace-keeping force on Cyprus, an
authoritative Greek Cypriot source
said last night.
Fighting raged in the island's
second largest city, the south coast
port of Limassol, while United
States Undersecretary of State
George Ball talked with leaders of
the feuding Greek and Turkish-
speaking factions.
* * *
WASHINGTON-President Lyn-
don B. Johnson will name Fulton
Freeman, a career diplomat and
ambassador to Colombia, to be am-
bassador to Mexico.
The White House, in announc-
this yesterday, said Freeman might
participate in talks Johnson will
have in Los Angeles and Palm

Springs, Calif., next week with;
President Adolfo Lopez Mateos of
Mexico.
DALLAS - Defense Attorney
Melvin Belli charged yesterday
that a public relations firm work-
ing for the court in the Jack
Ruby murder case is part of a
Dallas conspiracy to deprive Ruby
of a fair trial.
* * 0
DETROIT-Auto manufacturers
were reported "up in arms" yes-
terday over President Lyndon B.
Johnson's proposal to create more
jobs by forcing employers in se-
lected industries to pay double
overtime rates.
* * *
NEW YORK-The New York
Post yesterday quoted a juror in
the trial of Byron de la Beck-
with at Jackson, Miss., as saying
the jury first voted 10 to 2 for

acquittal but eventually wound up
in a 6 to 6 deadlock.
Beckwith was tried on a murder
charge in the slaying of Medgar
W. Evers, Mississippi secretary of
the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People.
The case ended in a mistrial.

CAMPUS NITEE
H qRt S kTbC
HOD S RC

{.

University of Michigan
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
Presents

07,

I

ON SUNDAY, FEB. 16, at 7 p.m.

John Hersey's

DR. MAX KAPUSTIN,
Dir., B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, Wayne State University
PROF. GEORGE E. MENDENHALL,
Near Eastern Studies, U-M
conduct a DIALOGUE on
"JESUS THE MAN AND HIS TEACHINGS"
including
"THE JEWISH HERITAGE OF JESUS"
"The New Testament Sources in the Perspective of the Old Testament"
' This is part of the series on "The Jews and Jesus"
and continues the following Sunday, Feb. 23 at 7 p.m.

THlE

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