100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 13, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-02-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

PAGE ~TWO THE MICHIGAN DillY THURSDAY. FEBRUARY

.,: .

p

'I

I

PROFILE

:

John Ead ie

Zoologist Notes Patterns
Of Territorial Behavior

DAILY OFF ICIAL BULLETIN
i^; : "y::: . .fiS.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: from. time to
t time The Daily's new "Profile" col-
umn will appear with an Interview
of a campus personality currently
in the news.)
By JOHN BRYANT
The newly elected president of
the Inter-Quadrangle Council
aims to launch his administration
from the tightly-knit organiza-
tional base created by retiring IQC
President Curtis Huntington, '64.
John Eadie, '65, a history major
from Livonia, comes well versed
in Huntington's policies. He served
that administration as vice pres-
ident.
The Huntington administration
was forced to start from scratch
and totally reshape the structure
of IQC, he explains.
One Instance
As one example, Eadie notes
that when Huntington took office
in the fall, he was confronted with
a non-existent committee struc-
ture. However, under his leader-
ship the organization solidified
and provided a committee system
geared to expansion.
One of the main areas in which
IQ must expand is communica-
tions, Eadie feels. "We are going
to make a concentrated effort to
get people at all levels aware of
the existence of our organization
and its functions."
As part of this program, IQC is
expanding both Sthe size and dis-
tribution of its newsletter. Eadie
and the rest of the officers also
intend to develop more personal
communication with house presi-
dents.
Dispel Vague Notions
In the past, many presidents
have had only a vague notion of
what IQC was doing, he notes.

"We will try to give them a first-
hand knowledge of the various
issues to make them fetI closer to
IQC."
Another plan involves encour-
aging communication among the
various houses. Many ideas that
have been successful in one could
be used with equal success in oth-
ers.
'We also intend to stimulate in-
terest in our organization by
means of a stepped up informa-
tion program during the first
weeks of the semester which
would outline what activities the
quadrangle and IQC are offering.
Middle Ground
Eadie views the quadrangle sys-
tem as a middle ground between
fraternities and apartments.
"We can never equal the close
group relationships offered by fra-
ternities nor can we ever equal
the independence offered by an
apartment. However, we can offer
some c f both.
The various houses should be
able to increase spirit and activi-
ties. However, the increasing num-
ber of freshmen coming into the
residence halls each year may
force upperclassmen out of the
system, thus removing much of
the continuity and leadership.
Semester Contract
"One possible solution may rest
in cutting residence hall contracts
to one semester. This would allow
those who are not interested in
house activities to move out, leav-
ing a nucleus of interested men."
IQC also intends to discuss with
Interfraternity Council the effect
of rush on the quadrangle system.
"We have found that first semes-
ter rush has created problems by
immediately cutting into spirit
and manpower."

JOHN L. EADIE

By STEVEN HALLER I
Most forms of animal life dis-
play an obvious tendency to de-
fend their own territory against
intrusion, Prof. William H. Burt
of tle- zoology department told a
seminar yesterday.
There are many definitions of
home territory among animals,
but "the one I like best is that
of G. K. Noble, who refers to it
as 'any defended area'," Prof. Burt
said.
Prof. Burt further defined an
animal's home range as that area
it normally covers in the course
of its life-activities. "The part of
its home range that an animal
might try to protect then would
be its territory," he said.f
Headquartersj
In general, an animal will es-
tablish a 'headquarters' in the
form of a nest or burrow and
then set up its territory around
that area.
Among cliff-nesting sea birds,
he noted that va'ch bird of the
thousands which .nhabit a cliff
Swill live on one small part of the
rock, no closer than pecking dis-
tance to the other birds in the
community. They will fish together
for food, but each bird will return
to its own particular spot Z
Stake Claim
Among some animals, such as
chipmunks, the tendency is for
individual animals to set up ter-
ritories for themselves and their
amilies, Prof. Burt noted. Among
others, such as prairie dogs or
howler monkeys, clan groupings
will act similarly to the individual
chipmunk in matters of territorial
behavior.
Why do animals behave this
way? "There might be several
possible answers to this question,

Coeducationai housing has gone
over well, Eadie feels, however, it
has raised some problems in stu-
dent government.
"The governing bodies in the
coeducational housing units are
mixed, yet they must send repre-
sentatives to two separate bodies,
IQC and Assembly Association.'
These bodies do not coordinate all'
their actions which has thus, at
times, made it unclear for both
South Quadrangle and Mary
Markley where authority lies.
"If coed housing is here to stay,
IQC and Assembly will need to
meet these problems." Eadie does
not anticipate any formal action
in the near future, however.
Eadie is' not yet sure what his
role on Student Government
Council will be. Declining to clas-
sify himself as either a liberal
or conservative, he does feel that
SGC should allow IQC to act first
on affairs concerning men in the
residence halls.
"For instance, the recent SGC
study of laundry service in the
quadrangles ought to have been
left to IQC."

male and female to get together,
he theorized.
Insures Food Supply
But perhaps this behavior in-
sures an adequate food supply for
the inhabitants of a region, Prof.
Burt suggested. This however
would not be a good explanation
in the case of the cliff-nesting sea
birds, he said. Their food source
is the water.
Prof. Burt commented that by
having individual living quarters
spaced farther apart, :.here is less
danger of epidemics and preda-
tory animals.
He noted that the motivation
could lie in preventing inbreed-
ing within a population, since re-
cently matured yroung would be
less likely to mate with close rela-
tives if the rules of territorial
rights compelled them to go out
and seek their own territories.
No set answer to tlhis mystery
has yet been found that would
account for any and all of the
myriad forms of territorial be-
havior known to naturalists. A
definitive explanation of such be-
havior is still in the future, Prof.
Burt claimed.
Greek. Women
Announce New
Pledge List
Panhellenic Association has re-
leased the following list of women
pledged by the 21 sororities on
campus in the 1964 rush.
ALPHA CHI OMEGA
Susan V. Baptie, '66; Diane M. Base,
'67; Beverly K. Benish, '67, Susan L.
Berquist.'667; Susan G. Blackburn, '67:

The Daily Official Bulletin is an r
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Build-
ing before 2 p.m. of the day pre-
ceding publication, and by 2 p.m.
Friday for Saturday and Sunday.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13
Day Calendar
Mental Health Research Seminar-
Norman Storer, Assistant Prof. of So-
cial Relations, Harvard, Univ., "The
Social System of the Scientific Pro-
fessions": Main Conference Room, Men-
tal Health Research Institute, 2:15 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Pabst's "Secrets of a
Soud," plus Trauffanut's "The Mis-
chief Makers" (Grand Prize, Brussels
Festival): Architecture Aud., 7 p.m. and
9 p.m.
Applied Mathematics Seminar: Otto
Ruehr, Radiation Laboratory, will speak
on "Stephan's Problem," at 4 p.m. in
Room 246 W. Engineering. Refresh-
ments will be served in Room 350
W. Engineering at 3:30 p.m.
Center for Russian Studies and School
of Education Lecture - J. G. Tolpin,
Northwestern Univ., will speak on "De-
velopment of Chemistry and its Teach-
ing in the USSR." In the Multi-purpose
Room, Undergrad. Lib., at 4:10 p.m.,
Thurs., Feb. 13.
Doctoral Examination for Karl Lewis
Zinn, Education & Psychology; thesis:
Valdation of a Differential Test of
Cognitive Objectives of the First Course
in Psychology," Thurs., Feb. 13, 6615
Haven Hall, at 9 a.m. Chairman, J. E.
Milholland.
Chemistry Lecture: "Infrared Spec-
tra of Avially Symmetrical Molecules,"
by Prof. T. Harry Edwards, Mich. State
Univ., 8 p.m., Room 1300, Chemistry
Bldg.
For Other University Events today,
see the Across Campus column.
IGeneral 1NVotices!
Spring Semester Fees: At least 50 per
cent is due and payable on or before
Feb. 28, 1964.
Non payment of at least 50 per cent
by Feb. 28 will result in the assess-
ment of a delinquent penalty of $5.00.
Payments may be made in person
or mailed to the Cashier's Office, 1015
Admin. Bldg., before 4:30 p.m., Fri.,
Feb. 28, 1964.
MAIL EARLY.
Mail payments postmarked after due
date, Feb. 28, are late and subject to
penalty.
Identify mail payments as tuition and
show student number and name.
English Honors Program: Students
interested in the English Honors pro-
TAKE YOUR FILMS &
SLIDES FOR QUALITY
PROCESSING TO
LLBLETT'S
PHOTO DEPARTMENT
RUSH SERVICE ALSO

p_____ _ _ _ _ _-- __ _

HILLEL'S SABBATH SERVICE

this week will be held at

gram are invited to a meeting Thurs.,
Feb. 13, at 4 p.m. In 2402 Haven Hall
at which the program as well as the
qualifications for admission will be
discussed, Freshmen as well as soph-
omores are invited. Students definite-
ly planning to apply should see Prof.
Barrows (1223 AH) or Prof. Greenhut
(2634 AH) before arranging their sched-
ules for next fall. Students In the
Teacher's program are eligible.
National Teacher Exams: Candidatesj
taking the National Teacher Exam Feb.
15 are to report to Aud. B, Angell Hall
at 8:30 Sat. morning.
Ushers Are Urgently Needed for the
'Sounds from the Summit" concert to
be given in Hill Aud. Sat., Feb. 15.

7 p.m.
FRIDAY, FEB. '14

Anyone who is interested in ushering
for this concert will please reportt o
Mr. Warner at the east door of Hill
Aud. at 7:30 p.m. on Sat., Feb. 15.
Placemenit
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
212 SAB-
Memorial Hospital for Cancer & Al-
lied Diseases, N.Y. City-Needs secretar-
ial or typist help & laboratory tech-
nicians. Applications at Summer Place-
ment.
Ne wYork State Civil Service, Allegany
State Park Commission-Positions open
as Park Patrolman & Traffic & Park
Officer for summer. Must be resident
(Continued on Page 5)

1429 Hill Street

Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel

r

STUDENTS and FACULTY
Dial 662-8871 for
Gine ea qd
Program Information

I

Across Campus

and the answer might vary from Ellen C. Drake, '67; Carole S. Foster,
one species to another," Prof. Burt '67; Marly Suzanne Fraker, '67; Ma-ri-
said beth Gilbert. '67; Pamela L. Griffin,
sat p i t '67; Nancy J. Hallewell, '67; Phyllis
There is the possibility that J. Hinkel, '67; Susan E. Jeremy, '67;
establishing zealously-guarded ter- Carol Ann Kupiec, '67; Charlotte Lev-
ritorial rights encourages repro- insohn, '66; Mary R. McConnell, '67;
duction by making it possible for See PANHELLENIC, Page 8

1A

Municipal Court Judge Francis
J. O'Brien will speak on "Civil
Disobedience and the Law" before
an open meeting of the Young
Democrats at 8 p.m. today in Rm.
3RS of the Union.
* * *
Conflict...
Prof. Karl W. Deutsch of Yale
University will speak on "Prob-
lems in Estimating the Probability
of Nationalistic or Racial Con-
flicts" at 4 p.m. today in Aud. B.
s * .
Irrelevant9 .. .
Akbar Hagg from India, Prof.
Merrill C. Tenney, dean of Wheat-
on College Graduate School and
Prof. Kenneth Pike of the Eng-
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Circle Honorary Society, Important
meeting, Feb. 13, 7:30 p.m., Conference
Room No. 1, Michigan League.
* . *
Le Cercle Francais, Le Baratin, Feb.
13, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Lec-
ture by Dr. Merrill C. Tenney, Dean
of Grad. School, Wheaton College, "Can
I Afford to be a Christian?" Feb. 14,
7:30 p.m., Michigan Union (3rd Floor
Conference Room).
Newman, Fireside Chat: Prof. Stephen
J. Tonsor on "Liberty, Freedom and the
Church," Fri., Feb. 14, 3 p.m., New-
man Center, 331 Thompson St.
Alpha Phi Omega, Pledge meeting,
Feb. 13, 4 p.m., 3516 SAB.
Congregational Disciples, E&R, EUB
Student Guild, Mid-week worship, Feb.
13, 12:10-12:40 p.m., Douglas Memorial
Chapel.

lish department will conduct a
panel discussion disagreeing with
the proposition that "Christianity
is Irrelevant, Impractical and Im-
material" at 4:10 p.m. today in
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Theatre...
The Student Laboratory Theater
will present two original one-act
plays, "A Night in a Hamburger
Joint" by John Wellman, '64, and
"Rain of the River" by Davida
Skurnick, '65, at 4:10 p.m. today
in Trueblood Aud.
. * *
Careers...,
Associate Dean Charles Leh-
mann of the education school will
discuss career information for fu-
ture teachers at 4 p.m. today in
the University Elementary School
Aud.
** *
Troupe...
Vera Embree's all-Negro Mu-
sical and Dance Troupe from De-
troit will give a program of "The
Negro in the Arts: A Musical and
Literary Presentation" at 8 p.m.
today at Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre.
* * *
Petitioning.,.
Petitioning for positions on the
Board in Control of Student Pub-
lications, the Union Board of Di-
rectors and the Board in Control
of Intercollegiate Athletics is open
until 5 p.m. Friday.
Petitions for elections to class
offices and delegate positions to
the United States National Stu-
dents' Association congress must
also be turned in by that time.

Today: 4:10 p.m.
Arena Theatre

Promptly
Frieze Building

STARTI NG
FRIDAY

DIAL 5-6290

ENDING TONIGHT
Cory Grant Audrey Hepburn
in
"CHARADE"

Two Original Plays
A NIGHT IN A HAMBURGER JOINT
by John Wellman '64
RAIN ON THE RIVER
by Davida Skurnick '65
Department of Speech
Student Laboratory Theatre
in cooperation with Professor Rowe's
Playwriting Course in the Department of English
ADMISSION FREE

I1

.......

Dial
2-6264 _____________

STARTING
TODAY

Shows start at 1:20,
3:45, 6:10 and 8:45
Feature at 2:15, 4:40,
7:05 and 9:30

Dial 8-6416 Shows at 7 & 9 P.M.
ENDING TONIGHT
"A MOST
DISTINGUISHED
FILMI"
.-rew YorkTm.
"FIRST-RATEI
DISTINGUISHED
ENGROSSING"'
-Hferald ribune
"A CINEMA
ACHIEVEMENTI
MAGNIFICENTI"
"-World Telgrrm&Sur

I

CONTI
BOOK
330 Nick
(over
BOOKS A
FOR
All NEW bo
10-20% OF
Artist's Gallery-
Sue Hodges 6

NENTAL
STORE
kels Arcade
Blazo's)

PR9wPeR

Written by
ARNOLD
SCH ULMAN

ARE GOOD
tYOU
oks in store-
FF during sale.

,I

Also co-starring Co-tarng IE A D A M S
Pandduced by Directed by
HERSCHEL BERNARDI introJuing BIOLEY ALAN J PAKULA "ROBERT MULLIGAN
Music- ELMER BERNSTEIN- A PARAMOUNT RELEASE EAR THE JACK ONES RECORDNGO

-Now Showing-
& Helen Cohen

I

I

E

I

I'
J

Sat., Feb. 29, 8:30 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM

Starring Co-starring °
TOMMY KRK- ANNTTE -DoN AM -STAr ERIN
Screenplay by TOM and HELEN AUGUST-Basedon astory by s il wALSAssociate Producer RON MILLER-Directed by ROBERT STEVENSON
Released by BUENA VISTA 0isribtione ,inc-01963 Walt Disney Productions

Block Sales:

Fridav.

Feb. 21. 8 A.M.-5 P.M.

..-~~rwu~uum rum

! 5.11 . .,. .r ,... .r . .., ~: 5: r'"

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan