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February 09, 1964 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-02-09

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I-l

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9,1964

fI

ARTS AND LETTERS:
Stokowski Helps
Young Musicians

This Week's Events

..."t.S .,.".yfl.VaS*%Wflf****"""" 5 m*W*Q*.........**....*v
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

By JEFFREY K. CHASE
Special To The Daily
NEW YORK - Eighty-three-
year-old Leopold Stokowski is a
man who has had a profound
effect on orchestral performance
in this century.
His frequent disregard for the
traditional in favor of the new
and experimental makes him a
greatkinnovator in his vocation.
Stokowski's apartment occupies
the entire 14th floor of an apart-
ment building overlooking Cen-
tral Park and the Solomon Gug-
genheim Museum and is decorated
with pictures of himself and
momentoes of his performances.
Another New Idea
Recently Stokowski has been
working with an other new idea.
His own words from a recently
taped interview tell the story:
"About five years ago I began
receiving letters from young men
and women stating that they had
graduated from one of the great
music schools of America and
wished to enter the musical life
of their country. Their problem
was a lack of opportunity.
"So many of these letters came
that I finally decided to hear
them play and to review their
qualifications. Up to January I
had given about 400 auditions.
Plenty of Talent
"I discovered that there is an
immense wealth of highly talent-
ed young musicians on all instru-
ments in this new generation and
decided to do something to give
theseyoung players opportunity
for actual playing in the orches-
tra. There they can receive and
understand orchestral culture,
which is something quite differ-
ent from any other kind of cul-
ture."
Stokowski's speech and ges-
tures are alert, but his walk is
somewhat slow and deliberate.
Physically he looks like a man of
65. He continued:
"I got the idea to form the

LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI
American Symphony Orchestra in
May, 1962. We premiered Oct. 15,
1962 and, now in our second sea-
son, are flourishing and doing
splendidly. I am very happy
working with these fine young
musicians.
Anyone Can Play
"The people who asked for an
audition were mostly young, but
not exclusively so. The orchestra
is open to all players of great
talent, irrespective of their age,
sex or color. We have many tal-
ented Negro and Japanese players.
"Another aspect of the project
is to offer our concert series at
a modest price so that middle-
income New Yorkers may enjoy
live music performance, too.
"But whether the players are
young or old, men or women,
white or Negro, American or
foreign-born, I ask of them only,
one thing-that they play well."

TODAY
2:30 p.m.-Prof. John Bardach
of the zoology department will
hold the third seminar sponsored
by the Honors Steering Committee
in Lounge 3 of Mary Markley Hall.
He will discuss G. B. Shaw's play,
"Man and Superman."
8:30 p.m.-The Sahm-Chun-Li
Dancers and Musicians from
Seoul, Korea, will present a pro-1
gram in Rackham Aud. as part of
the University Musical Society's
Chamber Arts Series.
MONDAY, FEB. 10
4:10 p.m.-Prof. Robert J. Har-
ris of the Law School will speak on
"Law and Politics-Are They Use-
ful Tools in the Struggle for Ra-
cial Equality?" in Aud. A. This
is part of a program commemorat-
ing National Negro History Week.
8:30 p.m. - The Sahm-Chun-Li
Dancers and Musicians will pre-
sent a special lecture-demonstra-
tion, in addition to their scheduled
Sunday performance in Rackham
Aud.
TUESDAY, FEB. 11
7:30 p.m.-As part of, its lec-
ture-discussion series, the Inter-
national Students Association is
sponsoring a lecture on "The Po-
litical Image of Australia" in the
Multipurpose Rm. of the UGLI.
Peter Nygh will lead the discus-
sion.
8 p.m.-"The High Wall," a mo-!
vie analysis of American preju-
dice, followed by a discussion led
by Leonard Sain, special assist-
ant to the director of admissions,
will be presented in Rm. 3RS of
the Michigan Union.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12
3-5 p.m.-Prof. Joseph L. Balint-
fy of Tulane University will speak
on "Mathematical Programming
for Menu Planning" in Rm. 311
of the West Engineering Bldg.
This is the first of a series of four
lectures on "The Application of
Operations Research to Hospital
Management."
4 p.m.-Prof. Ben L. Yablonky
of the journalism department will
speak on "European Television To-
day."
4 p.m.-Prof. William H. Burt of
the zoology department will speak
on "Territorial Behavior" in Rm.
1400 of the Chemistry Bldg.
'7:30 p.m.--The ISA will spon-
sor a lecture on "The Cultural
Image of Australia" in the Multi-
purpose Rm. of the UGLI.
8 p.m.-The ISA and the Mich-
igan Christian Fellowship will co-
sponsor an informal talk on
"Christianity and its Relationshi:
to other Religions." Prof. Akbar
Haqq, formerly of the University
of Illinois, will lead the discussion
in the Union Ballroom.

8 p.m. - A panel composed of
Professors Albert McQueen of the
sociology department, Beverly J.
Pooley of the Law School and
Broadus Butler of Wayne State
University will discuss "The Ne-
gro's Re-discovery of Africa: Its
Impact on American Foreign and
Domestic Affairs" in Rm. 3RS of
the Michigan Union.
8:30 p.m.-The Stanley Quartet,
composed of music school Pro-
fessors Gilbert Ross, violin; Gus-
tave Rosseels, violin; Robert Cour-
te, viola, and Jerome Jelinek, cello,
will give a recital in Rackham
Lecture Hall. The quartet will play
"Quartet in C major, Op. 20, No.
2," by Haydn, "Quartet No. 7, Op.
96," by Ernst Krenek and "Quar-
tet in F" by Ravel.
THURSDAY, FEB. 13
4 p.m.-Associate Dean Charles
Lehmann of the education school
will discuss career information for
future teachers in the University
Elementary School Aud.
4:10 p.m.-The Student Labora-
Theater will present two original
one-act plays, "A Night in a Ham-
burger Joint" by John Wellman,
'64 and "Rain of the River" by
Davida Skurnick, '65. They will be
presented in Trueblood Aud.
4:10 p.m. - J. G. Tolpin of
Northwestern University will speak
on "Chemical Technology in the
USSR" in the Multipurpose Rm. of
the UGLI.
4:30-6 p.m.-The ISA will hold
a tea at the International Center.
8 p.m.-Vera Embree's all-Negro
Musical and Dance Troupe from
Detroit will give a program en-
titled "The Negro in the Arts: A
Musical and Literary Presenta-
tion" at L y d i a Mendelssohn
Theatre.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Build-
ing before 2 p.m. of the day pre-
ceding publication, and by 2 p.m.
Friday for Saturday and Sunday.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9
Day Calendar
District 638 Rotary International Con-
ference-Registration, Mich. Union, 1
p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital-Bar-
bara Christoph Valentine, pianist: Lane
Hall Aud., 4:15 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Kurosawa's "Throne of
Blood," plus short, "From Inner Space":
Architecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Univ. Musical Society Chamber Arts
Series-Sarm-Chun-Li Dancers and mu-
sicians from Seoul, Korea: Rackham
Aud., 8:30 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital-John
Wakefield, baritone horn: Lane Hall
Aud., 8:30 p.m.
For Other University Events today,
see the Across Campus column.
General Notices
German Make-up Exam will be held
Thurs., Feb. 13, 7-9 p.m. in Rooms
1088, 1092, and 1096 Frieze Bldg. Please
register in the office of the Dept. of
German by noon Wed., Feb. 12.
Society of Sigma Xi: Dr. James T.
Wilson, acting director of the Inst. of
Science and Technology, invites mem-
bers of the Society of Sigma Xi to
meet at the Inst. of Science and Tech.
Bldg., North Campus, Wed., Feb. 12 at
8 p.m. There will be an introduction
to the programs and a conducted tour
of the facilities of the new Institute.
Refreshments at 9 p.m.
Student Tea at the home of President
and Mrs. Harlan Hatcher from 4 to 6
p.m..Wed.. Feb. 12. All students cor-
dially invited. -

Psychology Colloquium - Dr. Albert & Jr. camp. Wed., Feb. 12.
Bandura, Stanford Univ., will speak on Camp Birch Trails, Wis.-Will inter-
"Behavioral Psychotherapy." At 4:15 view for positions in girls camp. Open-
p.m., Aud. B, Angell Hall. ings for a married couple, tennis &
crafts specialists. Thurs. & Fri., Feb.
13 & 14.
Placem ent The Brass Rail, World's Fair Conces-
sionaire-We have applications at 212
SUMMER PLACEMENT: SAB-Summer Placement.
212 SAB- American Student Information Serv-
Camp O'The Hills, Mich.-Will inter-ice, Luxembourg - Only organization
view for Waterfront Dir., Unit leader that guarantees you a job in Europe.
(both must be 21), Ass't. Waterfront (20 Applications at Summer Placement.
yrs.), & a foreign student with skills Camp Nahleu, Mich. - Will interview
for Girl Scout camp. Feb., 11, Tues. Thrus., Feb. 13. beginning at 10 a.m.
Camp Batawagama, Mich.-Will in- This is a coed camp.
terview for Cabin counselor, Arts & New York State Civil Service, Alle-
crafts and Waterfront positions for co- gany Park Commission-Positions open
ed camp. Wed., Feb. 12, beginning at as Park Patrolmen & Traffic & Park
10 a.m. (also known as Iron County Officer for summer. Must be resident
Youth Camp). of N.Y. See Summer Placement for more
Camps Fairwood & Foreway, Mich. - info. Applications will be accepted up to
Will interview for boys & girls camps. Feb. 17.
Positions open-Men-activities, water- For further information, please come
front, archery, canoeing, sailing & ten- to 212 SAB.
nis. Women: sailing, archery, dramatics (Continued on Page 3)
1

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At Hillel, at 8 p.m.-Wednesday, February 12
Lecture IV of "New Directions in Jewish Thought"

FRIDAY, FEB. 14
4:15 p.m.-Bernard M. Bass of
the University of Pittsburgh will
speak on "Experiments in Organi-
zational Psychology" in Aud. B.
7:30 p.m.-The ISA will sponsor
a discussion of "The Folk Culture
of Australia" at the International
Center.
8 p.m.-John Bingley, director
of student organizations and ac-
tivities, will moderate a student
panel discussion on "The Negro
Student Views the University," in
the third floor Conference Room
of the Union.
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theater Program will present the
play, "A Man for All Seasons."
8:30 p.m.-The New York Pro
Musica, with Noah Greenberg con-
ducting, will present "An Eliza-
bethan Concert" in Rackham Aud.
as part of the University Musical
Society's Chamber Music Festival
series.
SATURDAY, FEB. 15
8:30 p.m.-Noah Greenberg, con-
ducting the New York Pro Musica,
will present a program of "Music
of Burgundy, Flanders and Spain"
in Rackham Aud.
SUNDAY, FEB. 16
2:30 p.m.-The New York Pro
Musica, conducted by Noah Green-
berg, will give a concert of "Early
Baroque Music of Italy and Ger-
many" in Rackham Aud.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Congregational Disciples, E&R, EUB
Student Guild, Sunday Seminar, "The
Early Church," Feb. 9, 7-8 p.m., Guild
House, 802 Monroe.
* *
Gamma Delta-Lutheran Student Or-
ganization, 6 p.m., Supper; 6:45 p.m.,
Dr. Jacobs-"World University Service",
Feb. 9, 1511 Washtenaw.
* * *
Gilbert & Sullivan, Rehearsal, Feb.
9, 7:30 p.m., Michigan Union 3-G.
Socledad Hispanica, Feb. 10, 3-5 p.m.,
3050 Frieze Bldg.
Russian Circle, Coffee-conversation,
Tues., Feb. 11, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze
Bldg.

British Summer Schools: There will
be a meeting of all those interested in
summer sessions at British Universi-
ties (1964), in Room 2012 Angell Hall
at 4 p.m., Tues., Feb. 11. Further in-
formation may be obtained from Prof.
Clark Hopkins, 2011 Angell Hall.
The Deadline for Receiving Rackham
Faculty Research Applications is Feb.
17. Instructions for setting up appli-
cations may be obtained in Room 118
Rackham Bldg., or by calling Mrs.
Marshall, Ext. 3374.
Events Monday
District 638 Rotary International Con-
erence-Mich. Union, 8:15 a.m
A 'CADE AWAR WIN Y i

Wednesday, February 12, 4:15 p.m.:
"The Cross and the Secular Mind"

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3rd Smash Week!

Presiding:

Dr. Roger W. Heyns, Vice-President
for Academic Affairs,
University of Michigan

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THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN,
OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS
presents 3 lectures by
The Rev. Dr. "Billy" Graham,
evangelist and author
Tuesday, February 11, 4:15 p.m.:
"Faith and the Educated Person"

4

Presiding:

Thursday, February 13, 8:00 p.m.:
"What Does the Future Hold?"

,4

Dr. Harlan Hatcher, President,
University of Michigan

Cary, Audrey
Grant Hepburn

4

Presiding:

Dr. Gordon J. Van Wylen, Chairman,
Dept. of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Michigan

by
RABBI DAVID W. SILVERMAN
Instructor Philosophy, Jewish Theological Seminary of America
Translator, "Philosophies of Judaism"
on
"Franz Rosenzweig, His Life and Thought"

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* All lectures to be given in HILL AUDITORIUM
* Admisson open only to University of Michigan students,
staff and faculty, their wives or husbands.
* I.D. cards must be shown upon admission.
0 The three lectures by Dr. Graham are co-psonsored by
the Office of Religious Affairs and the Michigan
Christian Fellowship.
* All other appearances and activities planned in regard
to Dr. Graham's visit are sponsored by the Michigan
Christian Fellowship.
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Dr. Graham is the 3rd in a Series of Ten Spring Lectures
sponsored by the Office of Religious Affairs

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