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February 06, 1964 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1964-02-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1964

TUE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. FEBRUARY G. I~1U

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9

Speakers Observe Week ACROSS CAMPUS:
Honoring Negro History 'Summit' Block Sales To Open

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Roger Marsha
Price Katz

Miriam Ralph
Kligman Silver

Koich
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CAMPUS OPINION
Tallying the Comments on France

I

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Two armed
Daily reporters with their shoot-
lug photographer invaded the MUG
and the UGLI with a loaded politi-
cal question. What has been your
reaction to the French recognition
of Red China and how do you
think this will affect future Ainer-
ican foreign policy?)
By LAUREN BAHR
and RUTH SELIGMAN
When confronted by The Daily's
inquiring reporters, some Michi-
gan students scurried behind their
books while others were more than
willing to voice their opinions.
Those who weren't camera shy
came up with a variety of answers.
Opinions ranged from approval
of de Gaulle's initiative to violent
opposition to recognition of Red
China. Some students favored im-
mediate United States action,
while others thought the matter
required more caution. Others not-
ed that the United States should
stand firm in its present policy of
non-recognition.
Ralph Silver, '64L, was very
much in favor of recognition, be-
cause the United States recog-
nises many other countries al-
though it does not necessarily ap-
prove of their governments. "Ac-
cording to international law, if
China exists, the de facto govern-
ment should be recognized. Judg-
ing from the number of countries
which have recognized Red China,
the United States will be forced
to do so," he said.
For Recognition
Turkish student, Ahmet Uzun-
hasan, '64E, was also pro-recogni-
tion. "Why doesn't the United
States recognize the 700 million
people in Red China? Take them
into the United Nations so that
you know what they are doing.'
Know your enemy in order to pro-
tect yourself!
"There is nothing wrong with
French recognition" he continued.
"Why should America impose a

force on its allies to act the same
way it does? Moscow directs the
policies of its satellites and we
would be taking the same atti-
tude."
In regard to having Red China
in the United Nations, Bill Levin-
son, '64, observed, "The more com-
petition there is between Russia
and Red China the better. It will
force Red China to take sides with
us."
. Ease Relations
Roger Price, '65, summed up the
attitudes of most people in favor
of recognition. "I think the United
States should recognize Red China.
It makes diplomatic relations easi-
er. It's better to talk with them
than to have them start shooting."
In contrast, others felt that
France's move would not and
should not affect United States
policy toward Red China. "The
United States can't abandon its
commitment to Chiang Kai Shek
since it has poured so much money
into Nationalist China. If recog-
nition can be limited to France
alone, France will appear as a
black sheep. Frande's actions
might mean the dissolution of
NATO," commented Richard Ma-
cherzak, '65.
According to Marsha Katz, '67,
"America will eventually have to
recognize Red China since other
countries are doing the same de-
spite the fact it is against what
America stands for."
Against Recognition
George Aspbury, '65, was even
more emphatic in his views. "The
United States should not recog-
nize Red China. France is stabbing
the United States in the back. In
the next ten years, the United
States must take action against
Red China, such as economic iso-
lation, or else there will be war."'
He predicted, "Russia will soon
be on our side. It's just a matter of
time."

"At present there is a minimum
to be gained by recognizing Red
China except giving them more
prestige," claimed Norman Peslar,
'64E. "The United States should
remain flexible enough to recog-
nize Red China if circumstances
should change. At present there is
no real advantage."
Formosan Obligation
Miriam Kligman, '66, is also
against recognition "because we
have an obligation to Chiang Kai
Shek. It's bad for our prestige if
we don't keep treaties."
Some students speculated on de
Gaulle's motives. Ronald Pretekin,
'66L, believes that they are in line
with "de Gaulle's general policy to
throw his third force into the
East-West split. He wants to take
advantage of the Sino-Soviet split
and act as a mediator."
The two-China situation poses
another problem. "By adopting a
two-China system, France will be
starting a precedent of recogniz-
ing China and thus doing the
United States a favor at the same
time," said Norman McLennan,
'65.
Self-Determined Policy
Koich Ito, graduate student in
economics from Japan concluded,
"First of all, France is following
its own policy. The purpose of
France must be an attempt to be
independent from one of the most
powerful nations' in the world-
the United States.
"Even though France decided to
recognize Red China, it doesn't
mean that the United States has
to follow suit. Most of the Amer-
can people don't know what the
foreign policy of Red Chna is go-
ing to be. Amerca should wait and
see how Red China will react to-
ward the Western world.
"They should examine how Red
China is going to treat France and
other countries whch might recog-
nize it."

A series of lectures and discus-
sions commemorating National
Negro History Week will be held
at the University next week. With
the theme of "How Far the Prom-
ised Land?", the program. will con-
sist of the following:
Monday: Prof. Robert J. Harris
of the Law School speaking on
"Law and Politics-Are They Use-
ful Tools in the Struggle for Ra-
cial Equality?" at 4:10 p.m. in
Aud A.
Tuesday: "The High Wall," a
movie analysis of American pre-
judice followed by discussion un-
der Leonard Sain, special assistant
to the director of admissions, at 8
p.m. in Rm. 3RS of the Michigan
Union.
Wednesday: Panel discussion
"The Negro's Re-discovery of Af-
rica: Its Impact on American
Foreign and Domestic Affairs,"
featuring Professors Albert Mc-
Queen of the sociology depart-
ment, Beverley J. Pooley of the
Law School and Broadus Butler of
Wayne State University, at 8 p.m.
in Rm. 3RS of the Union.
Thursday: Vera Embree.'s all-
Negro Musical and Dance Troupe
of Detroit in "The Negro in the
Arts: A Musical and Literary Pres-

entation," at 8 p.m., Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
Friday: Student panel discus-
sion "The Negro Student Views
the University," with John Bng-
ley, director of student organiza-
tions and activities, moderating at
8 p.m. in the third-floor Confer-
ence Rm. of the Union.
Seek Cadres
For Training
Special To The Daily
WASHINGTON - The Agency
f o r International Development
wishes to develop trained cadres
of technical experts who would
work alternately in American uni-
versities and on foreign assign-
ments, Frank M. Coffin, deputy
AID director, said recently.
AID now has 129 contracts with
72 colleges and universities for
projects in 40 countries, Coffin re-
ported, and is seeking greater use
of academic personnel in AID
work. Currently, President Jchn
Gardner of Carnegie Institute of
Technology is conducting a sur-
very aimed at expanding AID's
relationships with universities.
Coffin saw advantages to both
the agency and universities as the
mixing of assignments would en-
rich the individual professor as
well as the institution to which he
belongs.
Coffin defended the consortium
or joint-universities arrangement
in foreign aid efforts, noting that
it is one of many ways AID pro-
jects could be arranged. However,
he also cited the usefulness of in-
dividual universities doing a great
variety of tasks in one. country. as
proposed by Vice-President for
Academic Affairs Roger W. Heyns
recently. -
Heyns, returning from an in-
spection trip of the University's
foreign efforts, criticized the con-
sortium approach as inefficient
aiid called for more broad single-
university projects.

Block tickets will be on sale to-
day and tomorrow for the third
annual Inter-Fraternity Council-
Vulcans' Honorary presentation of
"Sounds from the Summit" to be
held 8:30 p.m. Saturday in Hill
Aud.
The program will feature vocal
groups including the Friars from
the University, the Nightowls of
Vassar College, the Sherwoods of
Cornell University, the Spizwinks
of Yale University and the Jab-
berwocks from Brown University.
The Legislature ...
Sen. Stanley Thayer (R-Ann
Arbor) will speak on "The Uni-
versity and the Legislature" at 8
p.m. today in the East Conference
Room, Rackham.
The meeting is sponsored by
the University chapter of the
American Association of Univer-
sity Professors.
GSC" Election.r
Members of Graduate Student
Council will elect officers at its
meeting at 7:30 p.m. today in the
West Conference Room, Rackham.
Peace Corps...
Placement tests for the Peace
Corps will be given at 8:30 a.m.
on Saturday at the Downtown
Post Office, 220 N. Main St.
Volunteers must be American
citizens at least 18 years of age.
Questionnaires are available at all
Ann Arbor post offices and must
be filled out prior to the examina-
tion.
Oxford...
Oxford Housing Project will
hold an open-open house for Uni-
versity students and the Ann Ar-
A 9
DIAL 5-6290
3rd Smash Week!

bor general public
4:30 p.m. Feb. 9.

from 1:30 toI

A'D'S...
Michael Grondin, '66, has been
elected president of the Young,
Democrats following the resigna-'
tion of former president David
Vaughn, '66. Christopher Cohen,
'64, was named administrative
vice-president.
IFC" Recommends ...
The Interfraternity Council Ex-
ecutive Committee has recom-
mended the following candidates
as qualified for IFC offices:
President: Fred Lambert, '65
and Lawrence Lossing, '65.
Executive vice-president: Robert
Bolle, '65; Stephen Idema, '65 and
Robert Tobias, '65.
DIAL 8-6416
Ends Tonight
"VIGOR, HIGH COMEDY,
DRY WIT AND
SUBTLETY!"
-N.Y. Herald-Tribune

Administrative vice-president:
Edward Heiser, '65.
Secretary: Jeffrey Fortune, '65.
Treasurer: William Schroeder,
'65E.
The election will take place
Feb. 27.
Union.
Petitions for the three senior
office positions of the Michigan
Union are now available in the
Union's senior offices.
All juniors are eligible to apply
for the position of president.

I'

ENDS SATURDAY -
Shows at 1:00-3:35
6:20 and 9:00
DIAL 2-6264
A BOLD NEW LOOK IN SUSPENSE!,
METRO GOLOWYN MAYER p esens
PAUL NEWMAN

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UO CO UE

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U I U

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COMING FRIDAY A
Laurence Olivier
Merle Oberson
"WUTHERING
HEIGHTS"

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Costrn
ELKE SO MMER. lt icoey
: EDWARD 6. RINSON
as Qr Stratman
PANAVISIO and METROCOLOR
______SU NDfAY .

Cary.v, Audrey
Grant Hepburn

PROF. ROBERT J. HARRIS

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Walt Disney's
"THE MISADVENTURES
OF MERLIN JONES"

STUDENTS and FACULTY

Dial 662-8871 for

I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I

Clitena q udk
Program Information

1=1~EDNEN
A lMiw N OWinTECHNICOLOR

Our prices are competitive; Our selection of records is second to none;
AND WE KNOW WHAT WE HAVE.
Let us help you find LP's tailored to your wishes.
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MUSIC SHOP

The Daily Official Bulletin is
An official publication of the Uni-
versity. of Michigan for which the
Michigan Daily assumes no edi-
torial responsibility. Notices should
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Build-
ing before 2 p.m. of the day pre-
cedingf publication, and by 2 p.m.
Friday for Saturday and Sunday.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6
Day Calendar
Firt Instructors' Training Conference,
Second Section-Civil Defense and Dis-
aster Training Center.
Cinema Guild-Arnold Wesker's "The
Kitchen," plus short, "Good Night, Soc-
rates" (Golden Lion Award, Venace):
Architecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Statistics Seminar: Prof. Bruce M.

OEUROPE

Hill will speak at 4 p.m. on "Some Non-
Parametric Problems" in Room 3201 An-]
gell Hall.
Applied Mathematics Seminar: Prof.
R. V. Churchill will speak on "Integral
Transforms Associated with Boundary
Conditions of Third Type," at 4 p.m.
in 246 W. Engrg. Coffee will be served
in Room 350 W. Engrg. at 3:30.
Communication Sciences Colloquium:
Prof. Richard L. Meier, research social
scientist at the Mental Health Re-
search Inst., will speak on "Communi-
cations and Development," at 4:15 p.m.
in 411 Mason Hall.
Chemistry Dept. Colloquia: "Solvolysis
of Some 3-Substituted Bicyclo (3.2.1)
Octanes" by Philip Jackisch. "Some Re-
actions of Phosphoric-Carbonic Anhy-
dride Derivatives" by Dean Griffith, 8
p.m., Room 1300 Chemistry Bldg.
Research Seminar: Prof. George S.
diorne, Prof. of industrial relations
and director, Bureau of Industrial Re-
lations, the U-M, will speak on (The
Effects on the Labor Force of the
Changing Occupational Structure," at
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of this column for announcements
is available to officially recognized and
registered organizations only. Organiza-
tions who are planning to be active
for spring Semester should be registered
by February 7, 1964. Forms available at
1011 Student Activities Building.
Cinema Guild Film showing: Arnold
Wesker's "The Kitchen," Feb. 6 and 71
at 7 and 9 p.m., Architecture Aud.
- *
Congregational Disciples, E & R,
EUB Campus Ministry, Mid-week wor-
ship, Feb. 6, 12:10-12.40 p.m., Douglas
IMemorial Chapel.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Lec-
ture by Dr. Eugene Williams, "Digging
the Past for the Present," Feb. 7, 7:30
p.m.. Michigan Union, 3rd Floor Conf.
Physical Therapy Club Meeting,
~Thursday, Feb. 7, 7:30 p.m., 3rd floor
conference room, University Hospital.
Program-Miss Wilson speaker.

the Mental Health Research Insti. in
the Main Conference Room from 2:15 to
3:45 p.m.
For Other University Events today,
see the Across Campus column.
General Notices
College of Lit., Science and Arts, and
Schools of Business Admin., Education,
Music, Natural Resources, Nursing and
Public Health: Students who received
marks of I, X, or No Report at the end
of their last semester or summer ses-
sion of attendance will receive a grade
of "E" in the course or courses unless
this work is made up. The final date
of acceptance for make-up grades this
semester is Fel. 13, 1964. Students
wishing an extension of time beyond
this date should file a petition with
the appropriate official of their re-
spective schools.
In the School of Nursing, the above
information refers to non-Nursing
courses only.
Law School Admission Test: Candi-
dates taking the Law School admission
Test on Sat., Feb. 8 are requested to
report to Room 130 Business Adminis-
tration Bldg.. at 8:30 Sat. morning."
Preliminary Exams, Dept. of Linguis-
tics, for the Ph.D. degree will be ad-
ministered on April 3 and 4, 1964. All
students desiring to take preliminary
exams at that time must so inidicate
at the departmental office by Wed.,
March 4.
Applications for National Defense Ed-
ucation Act loans are now available at
the Office of Financial Aids, 2011 Stu-
dent Activities Bldg.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
The New York Institute for the Educ.
of the Blind, N.Y. City-Offering grad-
uate Scholarships & Teaching Fellow-
ships for training in the field of the
visually handicapped. Must have nec-
essary prerequisites for admission to
graduate college standing. For applica-
tion forms write: Dr. Merle E. Framp-
ton, Principal, The N.Y. Institute for
the Educ. of the Blind, 999 Pelham
Parkway, New York 69, N.Y.
POSITION OPENINGS:
U.S. Naval Laboratories in Calif.,
Pasadena - Vacancies for experienced
(Continued on Page 5)

"

1964

ENGINEERING GRADUATES
The Inland Steel Company, East Chicago, Indiana, invites you to
investigate our many career opportunities. Consult the specific
job descriptions in pocket of our brochure. Our representatives

will be on your campus on Tuesday, February
Mr. John G. Young for an appointment.

i th. Contact

Nwo YY f o
4
e
Q Q t

f_-

STOP TOURS
(Student Travel Overseas
Program)
Golden Bear and Empress Series
This is one of the finest student
programs developed. Annually
15 to 20 students from the Uni-
versity of Michigan participate
in these tours.
Contact Conlin Travel for all
information.

INLAND STEEL COHPANY-
WIMA HMtOR WORKS
EAST CHICAGO, INDIANA
An Equal Opportunity Employer

Steel

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NO 2-5587

GENERAL CO-CHAIRMAN
HOMECOMING 1964

Don't give her up yet

Send her a

Orient

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VALINTIN

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Third Annual-IFC-Vulcans

Pe Feb. 4-10

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SOUNDS from, the SUMMIT

CAiRD

Petitions Available at

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Student Offices, Michigan Union

I,

Saturday, Feb. 15-8:30 p.m.

Hill Auditorium

from

4.

Ticket prices: $2.00, 1.50, 1.00

I

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_ _ _ _ _ ..

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