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July 16, 1969 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1969-07-16

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, July 16, 1969

i .I

U

Everything is 'go'
for Apollo 11 crew

"LET IT SUFFICE TO
SAY THAT L....IS A
~MASTI ERPIECE."- AYOY

i

.1n..

(Continued from Page 1)
The space agency invited hun-
dreds of dignitaries, many of
whom have already arrived, to
watch the liftoff. Among t h e
"bird watchers" will be former
President Lyndon Johnson, Vice
President Spiro Agnew, 19 gov-
Bookstore
faces vote

ernors. 40 mayors, and more than
70 foreign ambassadors.
A mammoth traffic jam is ex-
pected after launch 'as thousands
of people attempt to leave the
area at the same time. "Conges-
tion already is beginning," report-
ed Brevard County Sheriff Leigh
Wilson.
Adding to the confusion are
3,400 accredited newsmen from
53 countries. "We have twice as
many reporters here 'than we've
ever had before," said R i c h a r d
Mittauer, Space Agency Public
Affairs offic~er.

"THE MOST
INTERESTING FILM
SO FAR THIS YEAR:.
"IF YOU'RE YOUNG,
YOU'LL REALLY DIG
.... -COSfOPOUTAN

(Continued from Page1) Despite the outward hubub, the
Brown said these statistics are people who are launching the
less useful, however, because there moon rocket are calm and confi-
is no information available on the dent.
tax laws in the states involved. "There's nothing I know of
"I think if we get nothing else, that would prevent us from
we'll- get the four per cent sales launching on time Wednesday
tax," Newell said. morning," said Dr. Iurt Debus,
The thrust of the communica- director of the spaceport. "The
tion from the Ann Arbor Chamber only thing we haven't simulated is
of Commerce, Newell said, is to the traffic pattern."
discourage the University from Moreover, no one here ques-
creating a discount bookstore. She tions whether the flight is worth
said the report is a redrafted ver- the $24 billion cost of the Apollo
sion of one compiled in 1965 program.
when the Regents considered, but At a news conference Werner
rejected an earlier bookstore pro- Von Braun was asked to give a
posal.- comparable event in human his-
The communication t from local tory. "I would say it compares
bookstore owners has not been re- with the event of aquatic life
leased, but it is expected to recom- crawling on land for the first
mend that the Regents reject the time," he said. "This is not an end,
bookstore proposal. its just the beginning."

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By ELIZABETH WISSMAN
Much Ado About Nothing, one
of the oomedies which marks
Shakespeare's maturation be-
tween Romeo and Juliet and
Hamlet, also marked the open-
ing of "Michigan Repertory '69"
-a semi-professional season of
summer theatre presented by
the University Players. Little
need be said about the nobility,
even the necessity of such a pro-
ject if Ann Arbor is to escape.
complete somnabulism this sum-
mer. And if you're debatj,~g
whether you should see a Truly
Gritty movie, chances are seats

at the Lydia Mendelssohn will
be even cheaper.
The Repertory has struggled
with the discovery of. a tone, q
.balance which shall mitigate
what director Richard Burgwin
calls the "claustrophobia" of
modern life. The theatre, in gen-
eral, has never been free of this
sense of ministering to the pub-
lic health, ever singe Aristotle
first defined the mechanisms of
catharsiBs. rut, while Much Ado
offers plentiful relief in its
abundant laughter, t h e pro-
duction is as much the reflex of

-~music-
New C horal Union
conductor named

The First Presbyterian Church
together with the University
Musical Society has announced
the appointment of Donald
Bryant of Princeton, N.J. to
choral-conductor positions with
the two Ann Arbor organizations
Bryant succeeds the 1 a t e
Lester McCoy as conductor of
the University. Choral Union,
sponsored by UMS, and alto
becomes director of music of
the First Presbytrian Church
beginning Aug. 1, succeeding
interim director Eugene Dyb-
dahl.
Bryant will be .responsible for
the church's entire choral music
program, with emphasis, Init-
ially on developing opportuni-
ties for participation by young
people.
The Schodl of Music has an-
nounced Bryant's simultaneous
appointment as lecturer, making
available academic credit in the
University curriculum to sing-
ing members of the Choral Un-
ion.
Bryant recently resigned as
director of the Columbus Boy-
choir School, which has been
closely associated with the
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Westminster Choir College in
Princeton.
During 20 years with the
Boychoir School he performed
over 2,000 concerts as conduc-
tor-pianist throughout the Uni-
ted States, Europe, South
America and Japan.
His choir appeared on major
television shows, including five
programs with the Bell Tele-,
phone Hour. It has made re-
cordings with Decca, RCA, and
Columbia, a cappella and with
major symphony orchestras.
Bryant's professional training
in voice, choral music and piano
began at Capital University in
Ohio where he earned a bachelor
of music degree in 1941 and,
after four years of military ser-
vice, a master's degree in, Com-
position ,in 1946. In 1948 he
earned an M.S. degree in piano
from Julliard School of Music
in New York City. In 1967
he was awarded an honorary
doctorate at Westminster Choir
College.
Mr. and Mrs. Bryant wil l
make their Ann Arbor home on
Heather Way. They have two
sons in college.

a mass psychosis as it is purg-
ative.
It is not really the modest f
schizophrenia of relocating an t
Italianate, comedy in more con- i
temporary decadence of the c
'Thirties-"transporting it to the
1930's of the Great Gatsby !"
according to the rather fey en- I
thusiasm of the publicity, bro-
chure. A part of the problem 1
lies in the use made of the new i
setting, which is far more remi- 7
niscent of Busby Berkeley than ]
of Fitzgerald. All of the gaudy l
vitality of the WPA is there, and]
to good farcical effect, as the <
players stylize their way through'
a tango instead of the more ritu-
alistic measures of a wedding
dance.
The portrayal of Beatrice, by
Maureen Anderman, is espec-
ially effective in the early , acts, ;
when her wit has the combined
dry tang of loel Coward and
bath-tub gin, But, while in-
creasing some of the sheer spec-
tacle of the play, the election to
do a Thirty-ish Much Ado has,
several implicit difficulties.
The characterization of the ,
Bastard brother, the root of
so much evil in Renaissance
drama, is only tenuously cap=
tured by casting him as a gang-
ster. The gangster of Ameri-
can mythology is eloquent only
in his violence and in the pre-
conceived ambiance of a post-
Freudian point of view which
can receive symbolic communi-
cation directly through acts of
agression. We lost the sinuous
power of reason and rhetoric in
the illegitimate brother, the
kind of cancerous majesty with
which his machinations take
their form. When Don J'o h n ,
slouching rather magnificently
into his mile-wide lapels, de-
livered the line "Let us go thi-
ther," the audience burst into
unrestrained laughter. And, one
has the impression, this kind
of response was not discredited
by the directors.
Beneath the circumstantial
pomp (of well-sustained and
highly functional set design)
and the skirmishes of wit (which
are many and highly entertain-
ing in the quick, glib pace of the

h Ado
action), there is a refusal to
come- to terms with either the
tradition of the play or the in-
novation of the production. The
intuition to capture a Sicilian
decadence in a modern depres-
sion might have been pursued
rather than milked for all the
nostalgia it could get. What is
at the center of both civiliza-
tions which could produce the
ironic love-May of Beatrice and
Benedick? The last acts of the
play turn on the ability of re-
ligion, humility and fideism, to
place the "grandest schemes" in
a proper perspective.
All of this is lost, unless there
is some attempt to create a cor-
relative mood in the secular
terms of the tweptieth century,
Perhaps we all live with a pre-
fabricated humiliation, a per-
spective which diminishes the
particular man without -recon-
ciling him to the universal pat-
tern of the "divine mphibian,"
whose nobility isF something
guaranteed in the permanence
of godhead. But, perhaps at is
inevitable that we, appreciate
o n 1 y, the circumference . of
Shakespeare's comedies - ex-
periencing the "happy ending'
as an evasion, without passing
through the implicit reconcilia-
tion at their center.
i-
OPENS
TONIGHT!
HOGAN'S.
GOAT
'UniversityPlayers'
MICHIGAN'F 69
REPERTORY
Lydia Mendelssohn

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circle your calendar
August 15, 16, 18, 19
School of Music and
Department of Art}
widl present the opera
The Merry Wives of Windsor
(in English)
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