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July 08, 1969 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1969-07-08

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, July $, 1969

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, July 8, 1969

records

art

An adequate English

By R. A. PERRY
Contributing Editor
Somehow you would not ex-
pect that one of the great
welders of music to words and
a man whose fits of depression
edged him to insanity, Hugo
Wolf, would have admired
the confectionary oratorios of
Haydn. Yet Wolf wrote of
Haydn's The Creation and The
Seasons, "What a devout, child-

like spirit speaks from Haydn's
muse! What naturalness, sim-
plicity, what perception and
sensitivity! What an abundance
of ingenious forms surround his
graceful tone picture!" In
these two works, Haydn's gift
for melody and fascinating in-
strumental t e x t u r e s indeed
raises the music above the ran-
dom idiocy of the libretto.
The Seasons was written to a.
poem by the English poet James

Mfodern 'Jasmine'
Quartet as usual'
I, t
By DOUGLAS GREER
The present Modern Jazz Quartet has been together for 14
years. John Lewis' concept of his group as a melodic-percussion en-
semble earned the MJQ a reputation as avant-garde jazz musicians
in the mid-fifties, and theit latest release does not reveal any
dramatic changes in style. The listener can dismiss any thoughts
concerning the influence of current sounds on the MJQ for they
have remained remarkable and perhaps regretfully true to Lewis'
original concept of the group. However, for the MJQ devotee, there
are some excellent performances by Milt Jackson, Heath, and Lewis.
All four tunes on the album are original compositions by John
Lewis. The title tune, "Under the Jasmin Tree", is an attractive
tune composed of a limited-pitch range in the minor mode. An
ostinato clapping rhythm punctuates the theme. The perform-
ance is almost entirely an ensemble effort.
The tune "Exposure" allows members of the group opportuni-
ties for individual expression. Individual contributions are always
contained within Lewis' understatement concept. The restraints
create some exciting moments when Jackson streches the outer
limits of the understatement concept.
"Exposure" is a ballad with some atonal learning. The lyricism
is punctuated by the ever-present rhythmic jabs of John Lewis.
Lewis' solo again reveals his penchant for single line and repeated
note ideas underscored slightly by a marvelous left hand. Dyna-
mics are generally excellent with the exception of some cymbal
crashes at the conclusion of the tune.
"The Blue Necklace" opens with some excellent bass, piano,
and drum ensemble sounds. Kay makes his greatest contribution
in this tune; however, the rhythmic ostinato grows tiresome.
"Three Little Feelings", is a three movement composition with
the first movement in a quasi-up-tempo-blues style. The second
movement is a delightful ballad, especially as it is interpreted by
Jackson and Heath demonstrates his extraordinary sensitivity in
accompanying ballads. Ensemble balance and precision is excellent.
Movement three opens with a characteristic sliding bass treat-
ment which is not helped by Kay's tom-tom contritions. John
Lewis adds some interesting quasi-Monk licks. This movement
is the happiest sound on the album and Heath's solo adds con-
siderably to the exuberance of the sound.
The MJQ enthusiast will find much of interest for him in
this album. However, those looking for any influences of con-
temporary sounds will be disappointed.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students of the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Secondr
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
gan,' 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor.
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues- DIAL 5-6290
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $9 by
carrier, $10 by mal. uOFed T eda n
Summer Session published Tuesday! MO .. A UIIN F
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates:, $2.50 by carrier, $3.00 by
rnail.

Thomson, the tone of the libret-
to being mid-way between
James Lowell and Edgar Guest.
Three characters - farmer Lu-
cas, farmer Simon, and farmer's
daughter Jane (no dog Jip)-
comment in recitatives, solo
arias, duets, and trios on the
weather, on Nature's bounty, on
the Virtue of Hard Work, and,
of course, on God's overseeing
graciousness. This all no doubt
conjures up visions of Norman
Rockwell paintings, and in fact
the man who foisted the libretto
on Haydn, one Baron von
Swieten, seems to have been an
eighteenth - century E v e r e t t
Dirksen.
Nevertheless, Haydn's music
is as Wolf describedn serenely
idyllic, unceremoniously joyful,
and, at times, convincingly dra-
matic. Instead of Rockwell's pic-
tures, we get musical Consta-
ble; instead of Dirksen's hypo-
critical rhetoric, we hear Words-
worth. One of the marvels of
Haydn's nature poetry is that it
never inflates itself to the pan-
theistic; rather the specific
touches of "nature sounds" that
Haydn focuses upon, in his Op.
33, No. 3 and Op. 50, No. 6
Quartets fill The Seasons as
well. Not only the flowing lyric-
ism but also the details of
Haydn's instrumentation hold
our attention.
In addition, Haydn meets
those major dramatic events-
the passage of winter into
spring or the rage of summer
storms-with' a full-bodied Ro-
manticism that not only antici-
pates but equals Beethoven's
Pastorale Symphony.
There have previously been
decent recorded performances
of The Seasons but Philips has
recently released the only Eng-
lish version now available (PHS
3-911). Maestro Colin Davis
brings his admirabletpenchant
for textural clarity to a scdre
that warrants it, and Heather
Harper, Ryland +Davies, and

leasons'
John Shirly-Quirk all sing mel-
lifluously and with conviction.
At times, Davis is a bit too busi-
ness-like and one wants some of
the warmth (though it too often
smothered details) of the long
deleted Beecham set. The re-
corded sound is good, but hardly
exceptional. The singers diction
is fine enough that the full li-
bretto boxed in the set becomes
only occasionally needed for the
choral passages.
Speaking of Haydn, a few
local record stores are selling-
out the old Schneider Quartet
recordings on the now defunct,
but then esteemed, Haydn So-
ciety label. Although all the re-
cordings are in mono, you will
not find better performances.
The Schneider Quartet was
comprised of Alexander Sch-
neider from the Budapest, Isi-
dore Cohen of the Juilliard,
Karen Tuttle of the Galimir,
and Herman Busch of the Busch
--in other words, members of
the great quartets of our time.
They play with incredible preci-
sion, blended tonality, and musi-
cal sensibility.
If you are a fan of George
Szell and the Cleveland Orches-
tra's way with Mozart, then you
will be pleased to know that
Columbia has just released a
spendid "Posthorn" ' Serenade
with these forces (MS 7273).
Eine Kleine Nachtmusik serves
as a lengthy filler. Often I have
felt that Szell's complete con-
trol and demand for cleanliness
yielded more antiseptic perform-
ances than music which breath-
ed. Yet these present perform-
ances not only reveal every
grass note clearly but also are
invigorating and alive. I'll wager
you never heard the Romance
of K. 525 revealed in such a
way, o

Rackliam to offer
all-state exhibitioni

"All the things You could
be by now if Sigmund
Freud's wife were your
mother."
REYNOLD, LOWE
Painting and Sculpture
JULY 7-26

'!

More than 40 Michigan cities
and towns will be represented in
the 17th annual Michigan Re-.
gional Art Exhibition, which
will go on display July 17 at
the University.
The invitational exhibition in
Rackham Galleries will include
more than 60 works by out-
standing state painters, many of
them award winners in local
and regional shows.
The artists and communities
represented are: Allen Park:
Karl Staber; Ann Arbor: Wil-
liam L. Brudon, Karin B o d y-
combe, Peter Dreyfuss, Elain
Kolasa; Bay City: Rita Greve
Donald Laser; Battle Creek:
Craig Bishop; Beulah: Thomas
Kneff; Bloomfield Hills: Eloise
Greene, Marilyn Spencer, Fern
Teit: Detroit: Marian Aston,
Frank Howell, Richard Kubin-
ski, Charles W. McGee, Harold
Neal, James Strickland, Walter
Dabrowski, Pat Kilbourn, Sid
Seeley; East Lansing: Margot-
Evans; Farmington: Gail Shu-
dark, Jean Burger; Grand Rap-
ids: Edgar Boeve; Grand Hav-
en: Robert Michmerhuizen;
Grosse Ile: Jean Teague Has-
call; Grosse Pointe Farms:
Charlotte Evans; GrossePointe
Shores: Lee McKinley; I d a

Jean Wetzler; Kalamazoo: Allen
Lant; Lansing: Carl Matsuda,
Marilyn Raymond; Linden:
Frederic Myers; Metamora:
Daniel Cote; Mt. Clemens:
Gloria Goeddeke, Ron Faher:
Mt.' Pleasant: L. D. Butcher;
Niles: June Cary; North Muske-
gon: Ginger Rude; Okemos:
Angelo Ippolito; Onstead: Tom
Thiery; Orchard Lake: Irene
Foukes; Pontiac: Mary Fink,
Vista Scott, Marion MacKay;
Port Huron: Evelyn Sullivan;
Richmond: August Gloss;
Romeo: Velma Sadja; Roseville:
Dolores Wise:; Royal Oeak : Lor-
raine McCarty; Saginaw: Kathy
Mitchel ; St. Clair Shores: Helen
Cartmell, Joseph Maniscalco;
Southfield: Alexandra Beaure-
gard-Bezou; South Haven: John.
Keary, Fran Laresen; Trenton:
Yoko Moro Keneko; T r o y:
Richard Royal; Union Lake:
Leon Haskin; Warren: Lewis
King; Wayne: Jane Dart;
Wyandotte: Eileen Anderson.

GALLERY HOURS:
Tues-Thurs. 10-6 Fri. 10-9
Closed.Sun. and Mon.

A'

Sat. 10-4

i
editions gallery
editions inc.
213-215 E. WASHINGTON
761 -6245

'K-

r- ,. m... __ ____ a _ _ .

. I
"
~

Ask -AT

i
t
i
{
M j
E

ANN ARBOR ,COLLEGE OF JEWISH STUDIES
(Bet Midrash)
Sponsored by
The Detroit College of Jewish Studies (midrasha)
SUMMER COURSES -
HEBREW-Beginning, Intermediate, and Conversational
Mr. Shmuel Raz, Tuesday and Thursday 7 p.m. (tentative)
-For further information call 971-1865-
YIDDISH--Intermediate. Dr. Charles Krahmalkov
Tuesday Evening - For further information call 665-4844
CONTEMPORARY JEWISH LIFE-Prospects and Problems
Mr. Robert Rockaway (761-7768 Tuesday, 8:30-10 p.m.
REGISTRATION-Tuesday and Wednesday, July 1 and 2 and 8 and 9
8 -9p.m. at Hillel - 1429 Hill Street
FIRST CLASSES- Hebrew, 'Thursday, July 3. Others Tuesday, July 8

'V
!r

ATTENTIOII

i

-I

"A New York version of
The Graduate'! Irre-
sistable!"
Judith Crist, New York Magazine
"'GOODBYEO C LUMBUS' S
SUCCESS!"
F' N s assa
' t aca n~ , cn

Now.You Can
WITH YOUR OWN REFRIGERATOR - IN YOUR ROOM
Now you can have cold liquids (pop, orange juice, etc.), ice cubes
cold cuts fcr late night snacks, all right in your own room.

Litter doesn't throw
itself away;litter
doesn't just happen.
People cause it-and'
only people can prevent
it. "People" means you.
Keep America Beautiful.
~' dvertising contributed
for the public good

t

z

F
R
E
E
D
E
L
V
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R
Y

F
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E
P
K
P

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I

-HILLEL-
Grad Mixer
featuring
POP, POTATO CHIPS, PEOPLE
Wednesday, July 9, 7:30
SOc
1429 Hill St. 663-4129

Rent the Executive Compact Refrigerator -- ONLY $7.00 Per Month

-i

BAIL BOND BENEFIT

LIGHT and COMPACT. This little beauty weighs only 45
pounds total and measures a small 20 x 17 x 18.
,VERSATILE and SPACIOUS. All three shelves are adjustable
and removable, yet roomy enough to hold up to six 6-packs of
soft drinks.
QUICK. Makes ice cubes in 45 minutes.
SECURE. All units are equipped with pilfer-proof, built-in tum-
bler lock and two keys.

LOW, LOW CURRENT LOAD. When running, this unit draws
the same amount of power as a 45-watt light bulb.
ATTRACTIVE. , Styled in tasteful walnut trim.
SERVICE. If this refrigerator should ever fail for any reason
we will immediately replace it at no charge.
APPROVED. This refrigerator meets all requirements of Uni-
versity Housing Authority.

Lmm--.--COUPON --..
THOMPSONS:
PIZZA
761-0001,
$1.00 OFF
*
One a large one item (or more)
Ipizza. One ┬░coupon per pizza. !
Wed
Pick Up Only
* 211 E. Ann St.-Next to
the Armory
Expires Aug. 1
w--®-#---inm-min- - ---I- m

DR. CHICAGO

d., July 9, 1969
7:00 & 9:00 P.M.
SOc

A FILM BY
GEORGE MANUPELLI,
ALSO AVAILABLE,
IN COLOR SEE
"DOPEHEADS, SEX
NUTS, AND
PUBLIC DRUNKS"'
(D. HARVEY)
FILMED AT
WEST PARK,
SUN., JUNE 29, 1969

SUMMER SPECIAL $6.00 PER MONTH

I

WE HAVE FOUND THAT MANY STUDENTS HERE FOR THE SUMMER WILL BE HERE ALL YEAR - AS A SPECIAL
INCENTIVE ANY STUDENT WHO GUARANTEES HE WILL KEEP THE REFRIGERATOR FOR 12 MONTHS MAY
RENT THE REFRIGERATOR FOR $6.00 PER MONTH.

HOW TO RENT THE EXECUTIVE

'4

I

FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY CALL 769-3550 DURING REGULAR STORE HOURS 9 A.M. TO 9 P.M. OR STOP AT 211
S. STATE, ANN ARBOR.
ONLY $7.00 Per Month!Split this with a roommate and
That's $3.50 a month, or 12c a day.

Once while you were
at the movies

HURRY ! OUR SUPPLY IS LIMITED!

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