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July 03, 1969 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1969-07-03

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, July 3, 1969

cinema

art

'If:' In
By FARGO BERMAN
Mick Travis heads a group
of three rebellious students at
a fictitious British school named.
College. Most of the upper-
classmen accepted the school's
repressive rules and rituals long
ago and most of them are prissy
homosexuals, so it is hard to
blame Travis' trio for not fall-
ing into line.
Travis can never accept his
fantasies as mere. fantasies -
if he can imagine stealing a
motorcycle, he actually takes it.
And by the end of the film,
when Travis and his group could
Just "murder" the school's staff,
students, and the student's fam-
ilies, who have gathered at a
pompous assembly, it is almost
possible to accept the fact that
they do their best to machine-
gun every one to death.
The conclusion is not, how-
ever, fully acceptable a n d,
If,.. is not a potent "mes-
sage" film because, as repulsive
as the school's system is, and
even after the group of rebels
has been caned, it is not cred-

teresting but impotent

The eternal siare
at 'U nius

AGIANTOFA OVIE
FEATURE
TIMES
2:00
375 No.MAPLE RD.-769.1300 7:00
THURSDAY
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7:00
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ible that the trio had to go to
the extremes they did to pre-
serve, their self-respect and
sanity. Their crisis is not a true
one.
Travis, a character with what
will have to be the most per-
fectly cast face of the year, is
the standard class clown; he is
exceptionally wild because Col-
lege's repression is abnormally
rough - but he is not capable
of what director Lindsay Ander-
son wishes to lead us to believe,
To be fair, one must keep the
film's title in mind; If ... asks
the viewer to examine his values
as to how far he will go ihi a
battle against society's restric-
tions.
The movie pictures the prob-
lem of society's self-perpetuat-
ing encumberments (through
the microcosm of the school)
and admits there is no clear
solution. Anderson presents an
excellent view of a tragi-comic
school world. He includes many
bizarre episodes,. using exagger-
ation to add immeasurably to
the film's richness. But the final
chapter of the film is hard to

accept because actual murders
are too grave a contrast to the
rest of the movie, which has a
basically light-hearted tone.
If the rebels' actions are to
be considered a serious possi-
bility, the school establishment's
repressive acts would have to be
far more severe than they are.
Except for the uncomfortable
unreality of the last scene,
If ... is a damn enjoyable
movie. There are about ten
titled segments covering differ-
ent facets of life at the school,
although the titles are not
necessary except as a satire of
documentaries.
The pacing of the film is bril-
liant, with each scene or story
being allotted exactly enough
time to be savored without
overstaying its welcome. There
are just a few faces which stick
in the mind - the colorful
characters along with the many
who soon fade into the back-
ground are all sensitively cap-
tured by the camera.
There are few camera tricks,
but the direction and photog-

raphy bring many feelings
across. We are always in the
right place at the right time to
catch the vital facts. When
Travis and his two friends are
whipped one at a time, we first
see the nervous anticipation of
the two boys waiting their turn,
and then the cold-hearted tor-
mentors, who are classmates of
Travis and his cohorts, but are
the appointed monitors of the
student body, named "whips".
Finally we see the underclass-
men's reactions as they hear
the lashing sounds coming from
the floor above them. Certain-
ly nothing new under the sun
in film direction, but there is
the feeling that we have not
missed out on any important
aspect of the incident.
If... is highly entertaining.
The problems involved in re-
bellion and revenge are not well
developed as a topic for serious
consideration, but while missing
the "social - political deep-
meaning" boat, Anderson has
created a very nice film to see
and enjoy and not take too
seriously.

An unusual exhibition devot-
ed to "The Square in Painting"
will open at the University Mu-
seum of Art in Alumni Memorial
Hall this Sunday, July 6 and
will continue through Aug. 24.
Selected by painter Richard
Anuszkiewicz, the exhibition is
being circulated throughout the
country under the auspices of
the American Federation of
Arts
The exhibition surveys the
use of the square in 20th cen-
tury painting with emphasis on
the. contemporary artists who,
in many cases, may not be wide-
ly known to the general public.
Beginning with reproductions of
works by Mondrian and Male-
vich as "fathers" of the exhi-
bition, the show includes paint-
ings by the established masters
of the square such as Josef Al-
bers, Ilya Bolotowsky, Fritz
Glarner, Victor Vasarely, and
Charmion von Wiegand.
Anuszkiewicz explains in the

foreword of the exhibits ilus-
trated catalog: "Man has i -
volved himself with the phe-
nomenon of the square since
his beginning, The square is
found in anciet tings and in
rock inscriptio <carly cave-
men. The history of art is per-
meated with te square as one
of vhe most basic shaps known
to man."
Among the panters of the
"second generation of th
square" are Hannes Beckna,
Alfred Jensen. Bill Komodore,
Mon Levinson, and Reginald
Neal.
Included in the group of
younger artists who work with
the square are Jo Baer, Robert
Barry, Susan Blank, Mel Butor.
Ferdinand De Vito, Robert Huot.
Will Insley, Joseph Kosuth, Tom
Trengove, and Mason Wells.

PECK
CAM, 1 ORP'MAN'
NMKNIRB GLD

Suggested for MATURE audiences _
(parental discretion advised).

W L SY LU

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THURSDAY, JULY 3
Day Calendar
Degree Recital: Philip Rehfeldt, clar-
inet: School of Music Recital Hall,
2:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, JULY 4
SATURDAY, JULY 5
SUNDAY, JULY 6
NO EVENTS SCHEDULEbD
MONDAY, JULY 7
Audio-Visual Education Center Sum-
mer Previews: Dr. Leakey and the
Dawn of Man, and Overture/Nyitany:
Multipurpose Room, Undergraduate
Library, 3:00 p.m.
Degree Recital: John Ditto, Organ :
Hill Auditorium, 8:00 p.m. r
Doctoral Exams
Joyce Elaine Hendricks Pillote, Phil-
osophy, . Dissertation: "An Analysis of
Morality," on Thursday, July 3 at
1:00 p.m. in 2214 Angell, Hall, Chair-
man: C. L. Stevenson.
William A. Leuschner, Forestry, Dis-
sertation, "Factors Associated with Fi-
WOw,!
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A three-piece Treasure Chest
chicken dinner, plus french fries,
for only 79! Larger take-home
orders also. Try a box soon!! {
West ofPED ERICE
West of Arborlond

nancial Success in the Midwestern Ski-
ing Industry," on Thursday, July 3,
at 1:30 p.m. in 1503 Natural Resources,
Chairman: G. R. Gregory.
James Barton Young, Computer, In-
formation, and Control Engineering,
Dissertation: "Optimal Static Capaci-
tor Allocation by Discrete Program-
minjg," on Thursday, July 3 at 2:00
p.m. in 3513 East Engineering, Co-
Chairmen: W. L. Root and K. B. Irani.
David George Wilkins, History of Art,
Dissertation: "Maso di Banco: A Flor-
entine Artist of the Early Tyecento," on
Thursday, July 3 at 3:00 pm. In 208
Tappan Hall, Chairman: Marvin Eisen-
berg.
Frank Marcel Pichel, Education, Dis-
sertation: "The Financial Effects of
Teachers' Strikes in Selected Michigan
School Districts," on Monday, July 7,
at 8:00 a.m. in Room 3206 U.H.S.,
Chairman: F. W, Bertolaet
Lee Harlow Ehman, Education, Dis-
sertation: "Political Socialization and
the High School Social Studies Cur-'
riculum," on Monday, July 7 ' at 3:00
pm. at 611 Church, Room 3028, Chair-
man: B. 9. Massialas.

ment Services offers job hunting as- and shipper in public agency.
sistance for those seeking positions in State of Wisconsin: Director of Taxa-
all areas. Registration establishes a set tion Research, MBA, finance or MA
of credentials. Information, literature, Econ. and 7 yrs. exper.
directories, counseling, and current State of Washington: Recreation Re-
opening lists. Hours 8:30-12 and 1:30- :ource Specialist, degree and 2 yrs.
4:30, Monday - Friday, 3200 S.A.B. exper.
Announcement: The last Federal En- State of Michigan: Civil Rights Re-
trance Exam (FSEE) given before Oc- presentative, BA/MA and 1-3 years
tober is on July 19. If you are interest- community work.
ed in taking this test please contact Large Public Accounting Firm, De-
Miss Mildred Webber at General Divi- troitarea: Accounting consultant, em-
sion, 3200 S.A.B., or call 764-7460, as phasis on cost exper.in industry, MBA
soon as possible. .npref.

Summer Session published Tuesday
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Current Position Openings received by .
General Division by mail and phone,
for further information pleasedcall 764-
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Department of Mental Health, State
of Mich., position in Detroit: Finance
officer of clinic, hosp. admin., publc
admn., business admin. degree and 4
years admin. exper.
Wood County Community A c t i o n
Organization, Inc., Pittsville, Wisc.:
Coordinator of Follow through Pro-
gram, extension or Head Start MA in

The World Publishing Company, of
Cleveland, Ohio: Librarian for refer-"
ence collection, MALS and 3-5 yrs.
Marshfield Clinic, Wisconsin: PhD.
anal. chem. Records Librarian. PhDi
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ants in biol, and chem.
EDUCATION DIVISION, TEACHER
PLACEMENT
Placement Interview at 3200 SAB
The Detroit Public Schools will inter-
view prospective Special Education
teachers (all areas) in our office on
Wednesday, July 9. between 9:30 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. For additional informa-
tion and appointments contact Mrs.
Flynn, 764-7462, 3200 SAB.

SellI
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Ir® L ' T
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Spend the
HOLIDAY FOURTH
in Safe and Sane
Air-Conditioned Comfort!
ses
;r ,
0 ? .s .
" 'GoodbyeColumbus is
one of those films which
tickle us in our cultural
belly. We have no de-
fense against it except
laug hter."
..JAY CASSIDY
Michigan aily

r

I1

, w a -u~u aa a aca~ aw , aa
,elem. a uc. and exper.
P ac CityoInkster, Mich.: Chief of Po-
lice, 5 yrs law enforcement agency
GENERAL DIVISION exper, 3 in command capacity.
3200 S.A.B. State of Connecticut: Physical thera-
pist, regis. and 1 year. St. Transporta-
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Air.

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DIAL
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"A PICTURE YOU MUST
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-LADIES' HOME JOURNAL
"LET IT SUFFICE TO
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"THE MOST
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SO FAR THIS YEAR"%
-VOGUE

JULY 4, 5 - FRIDAY and SATURDAY
dir. by Jacques Cousteau (1964)
Seven intrepid oceanants lived for a month
under the sea without ever coming to the
surface.!
Short: FOREIGN PRESS AWARDS (Ronald Reagan)
7 and 9 ARCHITECTURE
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FOR YOUR COMFORT
Suddenly a new West had emerged.
Suddenly itwas sundown for nine men.
Suddenly their day was over.
Suddenly the sky was bathed in blood.

I

I

"Safety belts? Not if
I'm just going down to
the supermarket.",
-Kathleen Farrell
(1943-1968)
"Safety belts? They
just make me nervous.
Besides, they wrinkle
your clothes."
-Louis Claypool
(1931-1968)
"Who can ever
remember to use the
darned things ?"
-Gordon Fenton
(1921-1968)
What your excuse?

1

"IF YOU'RE YOUNG,
YOU'LL REALLY DIG
3... -COSMOPOLITAN
...hich side will you be on?
MALCOL.M McOMLL CHRUSN[ NOONAN . i RO "DA'V WOO ROBERT SWANN
DAVID SHERWN-L)AY ANDERSON -MCHAELMEDWIN LINDSAY ANDERSON COOR; -
"° A PARAMUNT PICTURE

I

4

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Enjoy Yourself - Join
The Daily Staff Today!

LAUREL and HARDY
back by popular demand
"THE MUSIC BOX"
Their only Academy Award Winner. All about deliv-
ering a new piano to the house on the top of a hill,
"TWO TARS"
As wild as "Big Business". You'll roll in the aisles.
"THE SECOND HUNDRED YEARS"
Watch Laurel and Hardy paint their way out of jail and
then land right back in again.
As A Community Service
Two Anti-Dope Films:
"H ... I WAS A TEEN-AGE DOPE ADDICT"
An early WCTU film on the dangers of pot.

i

Advertising contributed
.k for tha nublic nlod.

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